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Triumph DAYTONA 675 Sports Motorbike Review

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MCN overall verdict rating is 4

Triumph has labeled the 675R as a track day weapon/fast road riding tool, and MCN can’t argue with this. The stiff Ohlins suspension and lithesome, agile nature of the 675R chassis gives the impression it is a sorted race bike. Couple this with impressive midrange from of the triple-cylinder engine and you have a bike that allows devastating corner speed at the track. Although for the road the suspension as standard is bloody hard and necessitates softening off. Simple touches of a red subframe, carbon front mudguard and fairing infill panels make the 675R special and instantly recognisable. Nice one, Triumph. Now can we have a 1000cc version, please.

Engine

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 5

It is the same powerplant as the standard Daytona 675. Forget about peak power – although 115bhp at the wheel is not to be sneezed at – it’s the legendary flat but fat torque curve coupled with a midrange horsepower that makes the Daytona a breeze to ride day-in, day out without working up a sweat.
If you want to rip it up then the 675R will easily pump your adrenaline – especially on a trackday – simply by working the throttle harder. Something done very easily because the fitment of a plug and play quickshifter means it’s a case of simply opening and closing the throttle and foot tapping the gear lever.

Ride and Handling

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 5

Again, exactly the same as the Daytona 675 and is pure supersport. The seat’s high and has low-set clip-on bars but isn’t uncomfortable, just intimidating at first. The ride is exemplary on track thanks to the Ohlins fully adjustable front forks and TTX36 rear shock. Both systems make the gap between road and track use easier to cross by being fully adjustable. Because of its track-bias, the firm set up can cause the bars to occasionally waggle. While this is not a problem for the steering damper to take control, it would have been good if Triumph had kitted the 675R with a fully adjustable unit to make the ‘R’ transformation complete.

Equipment

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 5

It is the same powerplant as the standard Daytona 675. Forget about peak power – although 115bhp at the wheel is not to be sneezed at – it’s the legendary flat but fat torque curve coupled with a midrange horsepower that makes the Daytona a breeze to ride day-in, day out without working up a sweat. If you want to rip it up then the 675R will easily pump your adrenaline – especially on a trackday – simply by working the throttle harder. Something done very easily because the fitment of a plug and play quickshifter means it’s a case of simply opening and closing the throttle and foot tapping the gear lever.

Triumph Daytona 675R (2011-2012)

Detail Value
New price £9,799
Dealer used prices
£6,290 (2011) - £7,880 (2012)
Private used prices
£5,660 (2011) - £6,800 (2012)
  View full used price info
Engine size 675 cc
Power 126 bhp
Top speed mph
Insurance group 16 of 17
  MCN ratings Owners' ratings
Overall rating is 4 rating is 5
Engine rating is 4 rating is 5
Ride & Handling rating is 4 rating is 5
Equipment rating is 4 rating is 5
Quality & Reliability rating is 4 rating is 4
Value rating is 4 rating is 4

Quality and Reliability

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 4

Chassis components are no different to Japanese counterparts. This leaves the powertrain open to discussion, of which there are few web-based grumbles about the previous version (2006-2008), but nothing but good news has been said about this latest model. Racing has thrown up a few blown motors, but then this happens with Japanese and European bikes – it is the nature of the racing beast.

Value

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 4

The 675 is a brilliant middleweight in standard guise and worth the money, no problem. Add up the cost of the race-spec goodies and you are getting a good deal when buying the 675R with them fitted as standard.

Insurance

Insurance group: 16 of 17

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Model History

2003-2004: Daytona 600 – 599cc 4-cylinder, 110bhp
2005-2006: Daytona 650 – 646cc, 4-cylinder, 112bhp
2006-2008: Daytona 675 – 675cc, 3-cylinder, 123bhp
2009- to date: Daytona 675 – 675cc 3-cylinder, 124bhp

Other Versions

Specifications

Top speed mph
1/4-mile acceleration secs
Max power 126 bhp
Max torque 54 ft-lb
Weight 162 kg
Seat height 825 mm
Fuel capacity 17.4 litres
Average fuel consumption mpg
Tank range miles
Annual road tax
Insurance group 16 of 17
Engine size 675 cc
Engine specification Liquid-cooled, 12v, inline-triple, four-stroke. Six gears
Frame Aluminium twin spar
Front suspension adjustment Rebound and high/low compression damping, spring preload
Rear suspension adjustment Rebound and high/low compression damping, spring preload
Front brakes 2 x 308 discs with 4-piston monoblock calipers
Rear brake 220mm disc with single-piston caliper
Front tyre size 120/70 x 17
Rear tyre size 180/55 x 17

See all Triumph DAYTONA 675 motorcycles for sale

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DAYTONA 675

7524 miles

£5,491

Triumph
DAYTONA 675

9195 miles

£4,995

Triumph
DAYTONA 675

3296 miles

£7,295

Triumph
DAYTONA 675

14802 miles

£6,500

Triumph
DAYTONA 675

miles

£7,999

Owners' Overall Rating rating is 4.5(1 review)

  • I love mine!

    Jack Westguard

    Average rating rating is 4.5

    Show Details

    Overall
    Ride and Handling
    Equipment
    Quality and Reliabilty
    Value
    Engine

    Awesome bike made better with ohlins suspension and brembo brakes! I love mine to bits. I test rode the new BMW 1000RR today and that lacked character compared to the trumpet. The only bits that could be improved for me are the non adjustable steering damper and the notchy quickshifter! (Compared to the BMW's silky smooth one!) Bit annoyed they are making more though. My limited edition is getting less limited! :(

    24 July 2011

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stevecase

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stevecasesays

for a sports bike....forgot that bit Mind you hows about a round up of sporty bikes that fit the 'average' size Brit?

23 March 2011 15:15

stevecase

User's Badge

stevecasesays

Bet I could soften the suspension

When I put my lardy 17 stone arse on it, mind you I got a 955 as I knew it was a bit more spacious

23 March 2011 15:13

probiker25

probiker25says

Daytona 675R

I ride a 2010 Daytona 675 in phantom black with a few trick bits, beautiful looking machine and rides like a dream, went to my local trump dealer the otherday and had a nosey at the new 675R in the flesh, wasnt impressed in the slightest, the bikes lost its classy touch with the new space age graphics and red frame...sort it out triumph!

21 March 2011 22:37

GixxerFixxer

GixxerFixxersays

To Triumph or not to Triumph...?

I had a go on one o' these yesterday. Having spent a lot of time on a 07' 675, I can say that for road use I'm not sure I'm prepared to pay over the odds for the equipment on this bike. Yeah, it's all flash and all great, don't get me wrong. But you'll have more fun on a inline 4 thou, you'd have more of a rush on a V twin thou... seeing where I'm going with this Triumph?

There's  a HUGE market for a 1050cc Daytona R. I'd buy one, on finance if need be. All that would need changing from the current 675 is a larger rear tyre, a better selection of twin-can exhaust systems (Termignoni, anyone) about 180bhp, and possibly a larger fuel tank, sometimes when I climb on I feel like I've just put 50p in a park and ride machine, and I'm only 5"10 and about 11 stone.

20 March 2011 08:50

JustBe

User's Badge

JustBesays

hmm

Bikes these days are too expensive, 10k for a 600 and 1000ccs are rising ever closer to 15k, soon the Italian bikes will be cheaper lol.

The Americans pay far less, not only for the bike bu tthe insurance and petrol too.

 

18 March 2011 07:08

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