Skip to content

General Top Tips For New Bikers General

You are in... Forums > General > General > Top Tips For New Bikers

Got something to say?

Got something to say?

Go to most recent reply

Spindly Killerfish

Joined:

Jun 08

Posts: 239

Top Tips For New Bikers

I was just thinking after I posted the stupid reply about sticker removal (sorry) that there is a myriad of experience on this forum as well as the 'new to biking' fellows (and fellowesses).

Has anyone got any top tips (real ones this time) in relation to biking, skills maintenance etc that has been passed on or learned over years of experience that newbies could benefit from, things like taking out a coaster to put your sidestand on in hot weather so it doesn't sink through the tarmac.

Just thought as old farts could impart a bit of brain.

Sorry if this is a repost. SK.

P.S. whilst writing this I am wearing my wife's panties.

Reply to this Topic  
  • Posted 6 years ago (01 March 2009 13:13)

Post a message in General

Fields marked with an asterisk * are required

   

Please note. You cannot submit more than 4000 characters as a message.

Upload image(s) from your computer (up to 3 images)

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

Terms of use

Use of our community areas and forums is subject to important terms of use. By joining our community and using the features you agree to be bound by these terms. See terms of use below. 

Cancel
tazzer

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 5980

tazzer says:

Top Tip

Don't use WD40 to clean your brake discs :lol:

Reply to this Topic
tazzer

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 5980

tazzer says:

Another top tim

Smearing lemon juice on the number plate will make it invisible to fixed cameras !

Reply to this Topic
parapanfan

Joined:

Apr 06

Posts: 2670

parapanfan says:

Smearing lemon juice on the number plate will make it invisible to fixed cameras !

That's a pith take if ever I heard one.

Reply to this Topic
parapanfan

Joined:

Apr 06

Posts: 2670

parapanfan says:

Here's a Tutu in pink

Reply to this Topic
haplessdan

Joined:

Nov 04

Posts: 1908

haplessdan says:

site

testing testing 123

Reply to this Topic
haplessdan

Joined:

Nov 04

Posts: 1908

haplessdan says:

riding in France 1

 

Drive on the other side.  Put a sticker on your fairing to remind you.  Lots of Brits (and Frenchies) die every year by forgetting this.

 

Bus lanes are denoted by thick white lines and bus signs.  You aren’t allowed in them.

 

Priorité à droite: At junctions of any kind.  Unless there is a give way (cédez le passage/ dashed line on ground) or STOP (sold line on ground), all junctions are priority to the right.  You gave way to the person on your right, the person on your left gives way to you.  It works quite well, and you always know whose turn it is.  Watch out, even if you are on a big road and the other road is smaller, if there is no lines saying otherwise (usually there will be – look for a yellow diamond), you have to give way.

 

Cities are full of bicycle lanes and bicycles.  Watch out for them.

 

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

Reply to this Topic
haplessdan

Joined:

Nov 04

Posts: 1908

haplessdan says:

part 2

French restaurants are amazing and inexpensive.  I like Salade Lyonnaise.  Red wine with red meat.  House wine is likely to be fine (rouge (de la) maison), failing that try un petit côtes (du rhône) (where I used to live) or un petit Bordeaux (arguably the best red).  Avoid tablier de sapeur (lit: Engineer’s Apron), it’s a big lump of sheep stomach wall. Les Abats = tripe.

 


Reply to this Topic
haplessdan

Joined:

Nov 04

Posts: 1908

haplessdan says:

3

 

Roundabouts go the other way from the UK.  If there are no signs/dashed line on the ground, then Priorité à droite applies; ie the person joining the roundabout has priority.  Most roundabouts have markings and the person joining has to give way like in the UK, but not all, so be aware.  The Etoile in Paris, a gigantic 13 exit roundabout with the Arc de Triomphe in the middle, is priorité à droite.

 

Everything is shut on Sundays; almost everything is shut on Mondays.  Everything is shut every day for two hours (12-2pm) for lunch, except the restaurants which shut immediately afterwards.

 

Reply to this Topic
haplessdan

Joined:

Nov 04

Posts: 1908

haplessdan says:

4

Paper shops do not sell sandwiches and crisps the way UK ones do.  They sell papers (and pornography). 

 

Kebabs in France, unlike in Britain, are delicious, and unlikely to give you food poisoning.

 

Chinese food in France is weird, and nothing like Chinese food in Britain.

 

Standard limits are 50km/h in town, 90km/h on normal country roads, 110km/h on dual carriageways, and 130km/h on motorways.  That’s about 30, 56, 70 and 83 mph respectively.  When I came to the UK I put a conversion chart in my tank-bag’s map window.

 


Reply to this Topic
haplessdan

Joined:

Nov 04

Posts: 1908

haplessdan says:

5

 

Watch out for Gatsos, though they tend to be forward-facing ones (smile).  Usually there is a warning sign before them – a camera with a car and bike next to it. 

 

If you have any kind of medical emergency, call the sapeurs-pompiers (fire brigade), not the SAMU (ambulance).  Call 18 from any phone.  These guys are a branch of the military, have high-tech kit and are seriously competent.  The SAMU is more like Bupa.  They take you for a hip replacement and charge for it.  If you have a whoopsie, you want the Pompiers.

 

Get medical insurance. 

 

Learner drivers and new drivers (less than two years with licence) have a round white sticker with a red letter A (for Apprenti).  Watch out for cars with a round white sticker with black “Conduite accompagnié”, as this means the car is being driven by a spotty 17 year old with his mum sitting beside him.

Reply to this Topic

Page

Compare Insurance

Save money by comparing quotes. It's quick and easy

Motorcycles for sale

 

It's only £13.99 to advertise your motorcycle on MCN

Sell your Motorcycle

Motorcycle pricing tool

New! Find used bike prices