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Shakeyjake

Joined:

Aug 08

Posts: 12

Shakeyjake says:

Winter Riding = Rust?

I've ridden my almost new ER6 F through the winter and even though I washed it, had it serviced and kept it in a garage overnight, much of the steel work is furry, and the chrome coloured welds are weeping rust (just a little):upset:.

First question - is my bike faulty? (My 4 year Fiat is in better condition after 50k.) Second question: Should I/Can I do something to make the bike last longer?

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  • Posted 5 years ago (09 May 2009 20:11)

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iancol

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 1100

iancol says:

Winter riding and bike protection

Unfortunately, bikes are not as well made as cars in terms of corrosion protection.  Regular washing by itself won't do the trick (though it will help) as you're dealing with metal coatings that are easily attacked by road salt.  Try putting "cleaning" into the search box above as a start, as there have been many contributions in this area (and just about as many alternative solutions).

As regards whether it's faulty, you'll get nowhere on the condition of metal fasteners - they're all like that.  Pitting of painted surfaces may be down to stone-chip damage, so no go there.  If there is a lot of corrosion/peeling paint, then you may have a case.  How about some photos of the areas you're concerned about?

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4618

philehidiot says:

Stop caring

If you ride through winter you really need to not care about the bike's appearance. It becomes a functional item rather than something fancy and shiney for fun.

Grit will shed the paint and chip the plastic, salt will get everywhere in the form of vapour (if air can get into a gap, salt will too) and the constant temperature changes from below freezing to operational temperature will fatigue metal and rubber.

Best bet in my experience is to use a decent cleaner now (one of those gel based £15 a bottle jobbies will do it), leaving for the max amount of time on the instructions and using a sponge to agitate. Then CAREFULLY use a pressure washer at distance to remove - you're not looking for force, but for itty bitty water droplets which will get into all those places salt can. If some metals are looking tatty still, use a decent polish if you're that fussed. Once you're done, spray practically everything (not the chain, brake pads, discs or anyhting else common sense tells you doesn't want it on) with ACF50. You'll need to retreat with ACF50 before winter as well.

This is the reason people often have a summer bike and a winter bike.

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James600zx

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 2666

James600zx says:

Garaging.

Good on you for using the bike through the winter. I agree that a bit of wear and tear is unavoidable ( It also adds character!). I will only add that sometimes a wet vehicle pushed into a garage for the night will stay wet all night, whereas the breeze outside would have dried it. Depends on the construction of your garage but it might just be acting as a humidity box and not helping.

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jaffa90

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 8609

jaffa90 says:

rust

When i used a bike all year (in the 70s) just before the roads were salted, i used to paint all the frame and chrome including wheels with a thick grease (thin layer of course)more the welds, when spring came the bike looked awful and unkept:shock: Till i gunked it .:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin::biggrin: 

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Shakeyjake

Joined:

Aug 08

Posts: 12

Shakeyjake says:

Winter Riding

Thanks everyone for the advice. I think my bike sounds as normal as they come and I wont worry so much about the way it looks.

I will take the advice about cleaning and using ACF50 and I might even try the grease in the right places.

I am eventually going to get two bikes, and I might keep this one for the winter. When I come off my restricted license I shall take great delight in test riding as many shiny new bikes as I can! Now what's the best polish for chrome?:wink:

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iancol

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 1100

iancol says:

Winter Riding

Solvol Autosol, and get it from Wilco Motosave if you have one near you as it's cheaper there than, say, Halfords.

Almost forgot to mention - don't overdo the metal polish as it's abrasive and will eventually do damage on anything that's not stainless steel or polished aluminium.

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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oddbob

Joined:

Mar 06

Posts: 97

oddbob says:

3 Winters and an ER6

Pitted fork legs, swingarm full of water, furry fasteners, rusty welds, frozen solid ignition and petrol cap, seized brakes, knackered chain, slow to turn over in the morning. FI light comes on at about -6c ambient.

Thing is, this is one of the more robust bikes that I've owned... Never broken down yet.
Treat it as disposable and ride it 'til it dies. I'm hoping to get ten years out of mine. 14 is my record. Get something shiny for best if great to ride but scruffy worries you:smile

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