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jaa01

Joined:

Aug 09

Posts: 2

jaa01 says:

Newbie question on gear

Hey all

I've recently got a job (finally)

Which means that I now have a very real dream of getting a bike at the end of the year.

However, I was wondering if there was anyone here who could help me with which sort of gear I should be buying?

I'll have a budget of about £600, which I think will be enough for some decent, but not rubbish gear.

I won't be riding my bike crazily, as I don't think i'm like that, but I still want to wear all the right stuff, Road Rash 'n all that :(

Thanks in advance!

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  • Posted 5 years ago (13 August 2009 15:38)

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4655

philehidiot says:

£600

Hat - a 5 star helmet like the Caberg Trip is about £100. You can get them cheaper if you want to get a lighter one. The Trip is a flip up hat so you don't have to take it off in petrol stations and has a flip down sun visor, which is very convenient. Check out the SHARP website - some people think it's a crap testing system but it's currently the only one we have. http://sharp.direct.gov.uk/search/  Make sure the hat isn't too heavy - it'll wrench your kneck in an off and if you're planning on getting a sports style bike your neck muscles will ache. Any decent bike shop will be able to help you with fitting - fitting is crucial, you MUST try it on and have someone who knows what they're doing check it.

Jacket - £120 will get you something like an Akito Desert. All weather but not great as it'll get soaked in the rain and take ages to dry off as the waterproof membrane is on the inside. Goretex is good, goretex proshell is better as it repels the water and stops it penetrating the outer layers of the fabric, allowing it to dry off easier and lessening the wind chill on the return journey. Make sure the armour fits over the right places IN THE RIDING POSITION. Sit on a bike similar to yours in the shop with it on if you can. Oh and make sure the zips aren't going to fail - you can tell a cheap one, you'll be able to bend the tag thingy.

Back protector - a jacket with an inbuilt one will help against direct impacts, but this happens in around 5% of motorcycle offs. Your main problem is with torquing round and a good protector will support your back and help reduce this. It's an optional extra and probably one of the last things to consider on your budget as good ones are steep. The Akito Desert jacket has space for a back protector insert - Knox do a £20 one I think.

Trousers - £100 will get you good waterproof trousers. Frank Thomas Titanium have a two year warranty on the waterproofing and tend to leak in about a year. Keep the receipt and get free trousers, but occasionally a wet arse. Same applies as with the jacket - proshell is good but steep. Hip protection is a nice bonus.

Gloves - Overlooked. Two pairs - one thickish one thin. If you can get a nice thin pair of goretex gloves that's ideal as you can feel the controls and use them when it gets slightly wet, but make sure they're well armoured. Carry both with you. My thick ones were £50 and are not waterproof (although they claim to be, don't trust Frank Thomas for that). My thin ones are not waterproof at all and were £20. You should generally pay more than this but it's what feels good on your hands in the shop. Make sure you can feel through them and they grip on the finger tips. Wrist restraints are important, too.

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4655

philehidiot says:

£600 cont

Boots - You can go for specialist bike boots or if you're feeling cheap and get decent trousers you might be able to get away with some good work boots. The motorcycle boots are often difficult to walk in and more often than not spend a lot of money on fancy "carbon" bits without ensuring they're waterproof. If you've money then Altberg do some very impressive boots but the protection is poor. That said, you'll never get wet or cold in them.
If you have boots with all round good protection and don't mind ruining them for any other use, then you can get these:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiqqWjUnQ_8
You're looking for waterproofing, insulation, ankle support (they should ideally be able to take a 200Kg motorbike landing on them and not break your ankle).

Save some cash for neck warmer things (buff or whatever they're called - you'll see them in bike shops, usually a very unsexy product advertised by a very sexy lady looking very unconvinced) - even for summer these are useful as they stop your neck drying out from the wind and stop water running down your neck if it rains.

Waterproof backpack - Or a drysack to go in a backpack. You'll need it.

First aid kit - Remembering the stuff you pack in it needs to be fairly specific - how many injuries are there that you can physically treat yourself, can't wait for an ambulance and that you're likely to be conscious enough to treat? Get a basic first aid it and add in an FFD (http://cgi.ebay.com.my/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350196330257) or similar compression bandage.

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4655

philehidiot says:

This word limit is a nightmare

Remember, your kit needs to keep you warm when it's wet (the cold literally kills - you get wet, cold and you tense up, reducing control, your reactions slow and you lose concentration) and cool when it's warm (yep, overheating does the same). It needs to balance protection with comfort as being comfortable will allow you to concentrate on the road, not on the fact that your trousers don't quite fit whilst you're sat on your bike (they were fine in the shop!) and they're currently eroding your scrotum at an alarming rate. Ensuring you can feel pegs, levers and throttle grips through your boots and gloves will afford you control, but again they must protect you if you come off. Having protection to the point where you can't feel the controls increases your chance of needing that protection.

Also bear in mind that if you're not planning on using the bike in the wet, you can get non waterproof kit and pay £30 for a waterproof oversuit, saving you cash but making it inconvenient if you have to stop when it rains.

Consider a tank bag or a top box to carry your chain and other kit in as too much weight on your back when you come off really, REALLY hurts.

Bear in mind you do often get what you pay for, but if a shop starts trying to push you into buying a £450 helmet just walk out - you don't want to go anywhere where they're not advising you in your best interests. List your city and someone will be able to advise you on honest shops.

Consider the type of crashes you're likely to have - fast crashes in a track mean you're likely to need good abrasion resistance as you slippy slide but we're not looking at that, we're looking at going from 30-0 in 0.5 seconds via the floor. Impact protection is very important as is making sure you're not carrying bulky things in pockets - a mobile phone in a pocket over your chest can cause a pneumothorax if you land on it and a screwdriver in your trouser pocket could dig through your femoral artery. The initial force will rip stitching and cheap zips apart and you'll then feel the lack of abrasion resistance - check for decent stitching (you'll know the difference when you examine various priced kit) and good zips.

If you want more specific advice on individual products, you'll have to say what sort of bike you'll be riding and also if it'll be all year or just nice weather. Commuting kit needs to be of a higher spec than occasional jaunt kit, especially from the drying out side of things.

Ramble over.

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jaa01

Joined:

Aug 09

Posts: 2

jaa01 says:

Cbr125r

Thanks so much for the advice, I'll be spending the next few hours looking it all up

First bike i'm getting and keeping for my restriction is the Honda CBR125r, my uncle is an avid biker and he's helped me quite alot.

As for the commuting bit, i'll be riding all year round, definately, mainly travelling from my home to friends houses, or to my family in Wales.

I currently live in Bristol, and the only bike shop i actually know of is the Fowlers, which i've been to a few times.

Thanks again (:


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Enemy

Joined:

Sep 09

Posts: 144

Enemy says:

important kit to get.

you need a helmet, my advice is not to spend under £100 on a helmet, buy one thats comfortable, a good fit, and dosent feel cheap (i.e flimsy visor) you need good gloves, try shopping around in the *bargin bins* they may look like crap but you'll eventually find some decent gloves with armour and double stitching that are on sale (try and get non-waterproof leather as these are thinner and let you feel the controls of the bike and feedback better) i've got a "Lewis" leather jacket that was £60-£70 and a long waterproof jacket, i'd advise you to get a good waterproof textiles jacket because they are more reliable in the rain (leather isnt that bad unless its tipping down) you need to get some good boots, make sure they have good ankle protection i'd say spend nothing less than £60 on boots, feet can be badly damageged in a crash


the reason i havent suggested specific gear is because you need to find what gear fits you. on a final note i have a winter kit (rain/snow/sleet) and a (british) summer kit (sun/light rain/cloudy)  so i can be comfortable in any type of weather.

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gizzabreak

Joined:

Apr 07

Posts: 997

gizzabreak says:

It's worth

Checking ebay for bike gear.

Not helmets obviously, (never buy a used lid), but near everything else can be bought, and for peanuts.

For example, I bid on, and won a Frank Thomas Leather Defender Jacket in brand new condtion for £25 recently.

That was a £300 jacket new.

Lot's of people start biking, spend loads on gear, only to give it all up shortly afterwards and consequently sell their gear and there's nothing wrong with it.

Here's a good example.

Guy selling his jacket because it doesn't match his new bike :shock:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/MENS-BIKER-JACKET_W0QQitemZ120470710889QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_Motorcycle_Clothing?hash=item1c0c9d2a69&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

 

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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cyfer83

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 66

cyfer83 says:

Hein Gericke

Go to you nearest Hein Gericke store and give them your budget, don't feel puched in to buyng anything but try stuff on to get and idea of what you like and what fits you and the purpose you'll need it for... it'll be the best way to get a good idea of what you're after...

hope this helps

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dazzor

Joined:

Sep 05

Posts: 1

dazzor says:

Your budget and a Lid:

Some great advice, especially the bit about spending as much as you possibly can on your Lid. 


I've had quite a few, including 2 Aria RX7's. However, if you want a good lid for less money, try HJC, I bought one as a spare for occasional pillion duties and I tell you what, it's really good for £130-£140. I've got this one

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simon1977

Joined:

Mar 08

Posts: 2

simon1977 says:

kit in bristol

have a look in oldmarket across the road from the tatoo shop not sure of the name but its a red shop front

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Custard Tart

Joined:

Nov 07

Posts: 53

Custard Tart says:

Lids and stuff

If you can stretch to it, get an Arai. Their reputation speaks for themselves, plus look how many of the racers wear them. Admittedly not cheap, but you only get one head.:lol: As for everything else, Dainese is hard to beat. Not sure if Fowlers sell it but Infinity does if you have one close.

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