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kcmc

Joined:

Jan 08

Posts: 7538

kcmc says:

SUSPENSION SET UP

Whether you are a road rider or a racer correct suspension setup is the key to fast smooth riding and consistent lap times To get the best out of your bike it needs to be set up for the conditions in which you will be riding It is considerably easier to set the bike up for the Track as you know what conditions will be like for the next hour or so and thus you can dial in the optimum settings for the that particular situation. To what extent you change your suspension settings will depend on whether your bike will also have to cope with riding on the road. Unlike Roads Tracks are generally smooth and grippy

So if you are only going to use the bike on the track you have the luxury of fitting harder springs and modifying the fork and shock internals If you ride on the road as well as the track you will probably want to keep a certain comfort level and concentrate on just optimising the current equipment With incorrect suspension setup, tire wear is increased and handling suffers, which in turn can result in rider fatigue Lap times can be dramatically slower and in extreme cases safety can be compromised Hopefully the following guide will help you dial in your suspension for faster and safer riding both on and off the track Firstly you will need to check the Fork and Shock sag: this is the amount the forks and rear shock settle under load To measure it do the following: push down on the forks a number of times to settle them, then mark the stanchion with a felt pen or put a cable tie where the dust seal is sitting. Next ask some for help to lift on the bars so the front wheel is just off the ground and measure the amount the forks have traveled down This is the static sag (or unladen sag), This can be changed by adjusting the spring preload (more preload = less sag)Repeat the same process for the rear, this time measuring the distance from the wheel spindle to a fixed point on the tail know you are ready to begin setting up your suspension The key is to do it a little at a time and make notes as you go.

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  • Posted 5 years ago (06 November 2009 03:17)

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kcmc

Joined:

Jan 08

Posts: 7538

kcmc says:

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For road riding start with the wet track settings and work from there basic Setup. Check the following Forks sag 18-22 mm for dry track, 23-27mm for rain Shock sag 8-10mm for dry track, 10-14mm for rain. Check chain alignment If not correct, bike will crab walk and sprocket wear will be increased, Proper tire balance and pressure, starting with 30psi front and 32psi rear (both dry and wet)Steering head bearings and torque specifications - if too loose, there will be head shake at high speeds Front-end alignment Check wheel alignment with triple clamps If out of alignment, fork geometry will be incorrect and steering will suffer Crash damage, check for proper frame geometry Stock Suspension Tuning Limitations Manufacturers plan on designing a bike that works moderately well for a large section of riders and usages To accomplish this as economically as possible, they use valving with very small venturi. These are then matched to a very basic shim stack which creates a damping curve for the given suspension component At slower speeds this design can work moderately well, but at higher speeds, when the suspension must react more quickly, the suspension will not flow enough oil, and will experience hydraulic lock. With hydraulic lock, the fork and/or shock cannot dampen correctly and handling suffers The solution is to re-valve the active components to gain a proper damping curve. It does not matter what components you have, (Ohlins, Fox, Kayaba, Showa) matching them to your intended use and weight will vastly improve their action

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kcmc

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Posts: 7538

kcmc says:

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Furthermore, if you can achieve the damping curve that is needed, it does not matter what brand name is on the component. Often with stock components, when you turn the adjusters full in or out, you do not notice a difference. In part, this is due to the fact that the manufacturer has put the damping curve in an area outside of your ideal range. Also, because the valves have such small venturi, the adjuster change makes very little difference. After re-valving, the adjusters will be brought into play, and when you make an adjustment, you will be able to notice that it affects the way the fork or shock performs.

 Another problem with stock suspension is the springs that are used often they are progressive, increasing the spring rate with increased compression distance.This means that the valving is correct for only one part of the spring's travel, all other is a compromise. If the factory does install a straight-rate spring, it is rarely the correct rate for the weight of the rider with gear .The solution is to install a straight-rate spring that matches the valving for the combined weight of the bike, rider and gear to the type of riding intended Remember! • Always make small adjustments, more is not always better• Always keep notes of what you have done• Suspension tuning is an art - be patient.

K.C.and the sunshine band:tongue::sunglasses: 

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kcmc

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kcmc says:

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kcmc

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kcmc says:

http://www.maxton.netspinners.co.uk/

http://www.maxton.netspinners.co.uk/

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kcmc

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kcmc says:

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kcmc

Joined:

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Posts: 7538

kcmc says:

Motorcycle Tires Why should YOU care for your motorcycle tires?

One of the most important parts of any vehicle is its tires. Motorcycle tires are not an exception. Not only the tires are subject to a large amount of wear and tear, but also their durability depends largely upon how you maintain them. But before we go into the details of motorcycle tires maintenance, let us first understand how you should determine which tires are best for you.

One of the most trusted sources to which you can speak about the kind of tires that would suit your needs the best should be the dealer from whom you purchased your bike or your bike repair mechanic. Since both these parties do not have any interest in giving you wrong information, they make a good starting point.

Besides your dealer and mechanic, you can also look up for information on motorcycle tires in: tire guides, magazine reviews, manufacturer official sites and a few serious forums on the Net. This will help you to re-affirm the information that you have gained from your bike dealer / mechanic.

One of the simplest ways of determining the correct brand for tire choice is to look at the tires which are being utilized by other motorcyclists in a competition. If any particular brand strikes you to be most commonly used, it might do you good to check out that particular brand first.

It's VERY IMPORTANT that you also check for what your user's manual recommend. You don't want to end up messing up with the performance of your motorcycle because you chose motorcycle tires that do not fit the requirements for your bike and kind of riding.

While choosing your motorcycle tires, you must categorize tires according to their performance level, their wet grip ability, durability and mileage, load carrying capacity etc.

Of course, price is a critical factor as well, but always make a considered choice while deciding upon your tires. Nowadays, there are several financing options available which you can lighten the burden on your shoulders.

Assuming that you have purchased your tires and are happy with them, let us now checkout some of the ways in which you can make your tires last longer.

Tires are constantly being subject to a lot of dust, scuffing, and abrasions, mud etc. Thus, it is crucial to keep them in optimal condition in order to get the most out of them. Here are some great motorcycle tire maintenance tips for you:

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kcmc

Joined:

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Posts: 7538

kcmc says:

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MOTORCYCLE TIRES MAINTENANCE TIPS

-> Use a mild detergent to clean your tires.

-> Rinse the tires properly and do not use harsh chemical washes onto them. This will lead to faster corrosion of the wheels.

-> It is also important that you wash and wax your wheels on a weekly basis. If you have a aluminum wheel, then use a corrosion protector as well in order to make it look nice and shiny all the time.

-> Please bear in mind to always check your tires every time that you get on it for air pressure.

-> Regularly check for any cracks, stuck debris or loose nuts and bolts.

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kcmc

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Jan 08

Posts: 7538

kcmc says:

Avoiding Excessive or Uneven Front Tire Wear

All rubber tires wear down over time, whether they're on a motorcycle or automobile. However, you want to watch out for uneven or excessive wear, both of which can cause serious problems for motorcycle riders. If you pay attention to the following causes of excessive and uneven wear, you will extend the life of your tires and keep yourself safe:

1. Improper Tire Pressure - We have all heard about the importance of maintaining proper tire pressure at all times. Improper air pressure in your tire is a big reason for many tire problems and failures. Be sure your tires have the recommended pressure in them at all times.

2. Humped Roads -- Most roads are "humped" slightly in the middle or banked away from the center to allow rain and water to drain off. However, this hump can have a dramatic effect on one side of your motorcycle's front tire because the side of the tire closer to the center of the road will wear faster. There's not much you can do about this, and it can become very visible if you ride a lot. So be aware of this phenomenon and check the left side of your front tire often.

3. Disproportionate Cupping -- Cupping is a normal phenomenon on rubber tires that occurs when the brakes are applied. However, excessive use of the front brake can produce disproportionate cupping, when one side of the tire is more cupped than the other. Using the front brake will naturally put more pressure and force on the front tire to make it stop, thereby using up more rubber.

4. Wheel Alignment - While this problem is not as common on motorcycles as it is on cars, it causes uneven tire wear. Any number of things can cause wheel misalignment on motorcycles, including getting into a fender bender, riding over potholes, jumping over sidewalks and curbs, etc. It is a good idea to have your wheel alignment checked out at least ever month or so to make sure that a misalignment isn't unevenly wearing your front tire.

5. Shock Absorbers -- A bad shock absorber can wreak havoc on the handling of your bike and promotes uneven front tire wear. So make sure your shocks are in good shape.

6. Improper Loading -- The final major problem to keep in mind is improper loading of your bike, which causes your front tire to wear unevenly. Proper weight distribution is essential to being able to handle and steer your bike safely. Loading down one side of your saddlebag with tools or equipment can keep you from riding as vertically as possible, creating uneven tire wear.

So check your tires frequently, and keep these causes in mind if you begin noticing excessive or uneven front tire wear. Having the knowledge and taking the proper precautions will not only make you a safer rider but will prolong the life of your bike's tires.

K.C.:tongue:

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John-L

Joined:

Mar 08

Posts: 6

John-L says:

Suspension Set-up

As usual KCMC has looked on the internet for all the answers to the problems and repeated them from people in the field of suspension, tyres , racing etc. But he forgot  to tell you to change the oil and filter as is normal for him. (ie lights dont work, chain slack, wont start, change oil and filter first) If I want a doctor I dont  go to a quack.

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BIGMat

Joined:

Jul 09

Posts: 388

BIGMat says:

Can you help me?

My front end dips quite badly on the brakes. It doesn't feel good.

Would it be a case of maybe the oil needs a change or is it a set up issue?

I am quite a big lad (just on the good side of 17 stone) The bike is a CBR 600fs

Please also let me know if I'm just being a cock.

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