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Anonymous

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Steve Farrell  says:

Are trainers to blame for learners’ test crashes?

Motorcycle trainers are booking people they have never seen ride onto a controversial new test in which scores of learners have crashed. Poor preparation has been blamed for several learners suffering serious injuries on the new riding test. Yet MCN found trainers offering places without making any visual assessment of ability. Our reporter was able to book a test for a month’s...

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  • Posted 5 years ago (01 April 2010 16:16)

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MattMorris

Joined:

Sep 09

Posts: 52

MattMorris says:

Nazi sex midgets

I learnt at moto technique in manchester. Their policy was simple. If you aren't good enough you are only going to wreck the schools bikes so  it financially is not worth the while to rush people through the test. I agree that the rider is at fault as they are the ones in control ( or not ) of the bike but the test centres really need to meet the schools half way on letting pupils practice the swerve test. All the other aspects can be practised anywhere.  The story above is a little sensationalised as you have to produce your CBT and theory test results or you can't sit the test. And lets not forget that you have can pass CBt and ride a bike up to 33BHP on L plates for 2 years and never darken the doors of any training school. At least on a module 1 test the only person that can get hurt is the rider. Out on the road, well.....

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Biketester

Joined:

Apr 10

Posts: 10

Biketester says:

Even if the speed requirement was 30 mph and not 50 kph it wouldn't be safe to carry out the emergency stop and avoidance exercises on public roads. It's much safer to be doing these exercises on an enclosed site than on the road.

As far as practising is concerned ATBs have been able to book free training slots at the multi purpose test centres - many of them don't take this up!

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FellRaven

Joined:

Apr 10

Posts: 109

FellRaven says:

Part 1 Test Crashes

I returned to Biking last year having ridden for about 8 years previously but never having taken a test. Swerve and Avoid - Easy enough on a nice day at your own pace. I actually failed my first Part 1 test on this as I failed to attain the speed on the second attempt. So what was the problem? It was pissing it down, the rain was bouncing off the Tarmac. I had to partially lift my visor to avoid it misting and some but my vision was impaired. As a result it was harder to judge the corner so I was slower through this and was left having to accelerate harder towards swerve avoid. Also the test centre layouts are not as they should be, they have added an extra S at the end of the bend. This prevents you being able to accelerate out of the bend and reduces the distance to the hazard. Finally there is the psychological issue of accelerating towards a fence at the back of the tarmac area knowing that you have to perform a swerve then a controlled stop. In summary they make no allowance for conditions, I noticed the picture of that young girls accident showed it had been raining for her too.

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Szmolo

Joined:

Aug 09

Posts: 127

Szmolo says:

DSA idiots passing the buck

This is absolute bull. The DSA have created a stupid test and are now passing the buck onto instructors. Yes, there are bad instructors, but not all are to blame. INSTRUCTORS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO REFUSE TRAINING, IF SOME NUMPTY WHO ISN'T READY FOR A TEST DEMANDS ONE, THEY HAVE TO BE GIVEN THE TEST!! I'm training to hopefully one day be an instructor, and we get people who have never ridden before booking themselves in for a 3 day intensive on a DAS bike, with a test booked at the end. All instructors can do is recommend what pupils should do. Please MCN, don't make schools look bad, things are tough enough as it is.

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Morgano

Joined:

Nov 09

Posts: 24

Morgano says:

tests

If you look at the mod1 on utube it looks simple enough. If only practiced one afternoon in training in the dry then throw in some test day nerves, first day riding in the wet, some spectators waiting for their turn and it becomes quite clear to me that the DVLA are asking for trouble. Everybody rides different in the wet. As an experienced rider it's BECOMES second knowledge to avoid, drain covers, white lines, oil, gently on the brakes, if the bike skips around don't panic etc etc... Learners are told to be FEARFUL of these dangers. Then come test day their told to DO MOD1 OR FAIL YOUR TEST... No pressure there then. I enjoy riding in the wet or dry... I'm experienced enough now to be able to ENJOY riding... they should put more fun into riding and less fear. As for the test, I thought it stated that if it was "wet or raining" then you would not be asked to perform the MOD1, so is that not the case?

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windy12

Joined:

Oct 07

Posts: 754

windy12 says:

I agree with others..

When you are younger or even older but inexperienced the pressure of people watching is huge, when you are learning the small bikes feel very quick and as one person said, again while learning it is hard to also forget about an obstacle beyond the cones, ie a fence, wall etc.

Short of a working airfield not many surfaces are forgiving or spaces large enough to concentrate only on the action required.

I remember we struggled to get to speed in a yard for the emergency stop and if anyone's brakes failed they would be knackered, yet the instructor was good, the surface was grippy and the yard wasnt small.  Also the corners were challenging for people who had ridden before, cones are tighter than roads by a long way.

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colin8455

Joined:

Apr 10

Posts: 1

colin8455 says:

Motorbike tests

Is Steve Farrell working for the DSA in the PR dept? I doubt there is a motorcycle school in the country that would not book you in for training and the test at the same time. If you cannot cope in the time they just cancel it. If you pay for training you expect to do the test straight afterwards while you have it fresh in your mind.

I am an older returning biker who took the test last year. I had enough experience (it involved gravel) in my younger days to know instinctively not to swerve and brake at the same time. I suspect the person who combined the swerve and controlled stop into one was not a motorcyclist.

 I managed the training well enough and then failed the test in drizzly rain. I passed the following week on a bright sunny morning.

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wrab

Joined:

Apr 10

Posts: 1

wrab says:

NO

The schools will always try to book your test first and then try to fit the training as close to the test date as possible.What does it matter what your skill level is before you book, thats why you are booking training!!!. If you can't reach the skill level needed, its easy to cancel the test and reschedule after more training. The problem for the schools is very few have the money to rent such a huge piece of land with the correct surface to practice the pointless avoidance maneuver. Where are you avoiding into, the path of a on coming vehicle or into  pedestrians on the pavement. The DSA say its to avoid a car door opening, so you always speed up as you pass parked vehicles, I don't think so. All instructors will tell you to slow down as you approach a potential hazard. Remember the schools are teaching you to ride safely not to ride like a stunt rider. If the student can spend a hour on busy roads to get to the MPTC, why do they fail MOD 1 for only doing 49kph (30.45mph) in torrential rain ????? The DSA slag off the instructors and say its all there fault but offer no help, advice  or training, so what is the point of the DSA.  Why has nobody in the DSA been sacked and are we waiting for the first death before they sort this mess out. Remember  the DSA is a BUSINESS not a service.

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TheWookie

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 53

TheWookie says:

@Slomo

 

The trainers don't teach you to swerve and brake at the same time..

 

The way the trainers teach it is, accelerate up to the speed trap, roll off throttle, swerve, straighten up, then brake. Mostly the inexperienced learner panics and brakes before they've straighened out. Its quite surprising how much slowdown can be achieved with engine braking.

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TheWookie

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 53

TheWookie says:

sorry, that should have been at colin8455, not Slomo.

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