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Anonymous

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Andy Downes  says:

New Honda VFR adventure bike breaks cover

This is an official sketch of a new Honda VFR adventure style bike that will be seen in full production form in just two weeks – but it’s not a 1200cc as many think it is. The sketch has been released by Honda two weeks ahead of the Milan motorcycle show in an effort to publicise the show and let people...

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  • Posted 4 years ago (14 October 2010 14:35)

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Paulvt1

Joined:

Aug 08

Posts: 241

Paulvt1 says:

I get the impression the model that will be shown at Milan will be a V4 version of the CBF1000. Not a bad bike - the new one is good fun, but as a V4 fiend, this new machine could be a corker.

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Lightning Boy

Joined:

Mar 07

Posts: 82

Sense

Tomlloydy says "Why? How hard is it to wax a chain every week. Your just lazy!" Well, yes, I guess it is a bit, but I simply dont think its reasonable to have a bike sold into a market like this (an older, professional market) that expects the owner to get down on their hands and knees and spray useless flingy chain lube every other day. Do you think car owners would put up with such nonsense? I've recently changed over to a Guzzi, largely because of the shaft drive and big fuel tank. Every single time you wash the bike and give the rear wheel is simple wipe is brilliant - not hacking through a disgusting, black layer of sticky as hell chain lube and road dirt welded in place. Tom, shaft drive rules. Every bike that is not an out and out race rep should have it.

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mcned

Joined:

Jun 10

Posts: 25

mcned says:

Shaft vs Chain

Shaft please, this is 2010 after all....

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DoomedDog

Joined:

Jul 10

Posts: 390

DoomedDog says:

Chain Drive

Chain drive is archaic and is long overdue at being consigned to the history books. I don't see why some sort of hydraulic drive set-up can't be devised for rear wheel drive, a bit like what Ohlins used for their front wheel drive system.

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bbstrikesagain

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 879

Shaft drive..

..is lossy, and heavy and archaic.   It's doubly lossy when it involves two 90° gear sets, but even one hypoid gear (if the eingine layout is suitable) still has a big impact on efficiency.   It also requires quite complex linkages to counter unintended anti squat characteristics, meaning a good one is heavier still.  All this is acceptable when convenience, cleanliness and lack of maintenance outweigh it's other drawbacks.

Hydralic drive is lossier still and a dead duck for primary traction.

A lubed chain is by far the most efficient drive transfer system ever invented.  Yes, it is way too much of a pain to manually lube a chain often enough to keep it alive for commuting etc, but a ScottOiler only needs checking every few thousand miles and at tyre changes.  I use a chain daily all year round.  Present chain is showing no signs of wear at over 19k miles.  Thank you ScottOiler!

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Bikefar

Joined:

May 08

Posts: 96

Bikefar says:

Not very - Final Drive

I'd just like to respond to bbstrikesagain and lighning boy.

When one is touring on a chain drive bike - 500 miles a day - like I have done, first job every morning is carefully check your chain, make sure it is well lubed, stretching evenly, not generally slack. Once you get going all your luggage gets spattered with oil which gets everywhere, even if the chain isn't over-lubed. That's not how I want to spend my holiday. Bikes are for riding!

Later, I got a tourer with a shaft. All of a sudden, our holidays got longer.  :-)

BTW: I did meet a German with a Kawasaki - you could hear his chain throughout the valley, squeaking for mercy!

Given what I have said previously, my scottoiler works well but the touring kit was not trivial to fit owing to having to adapt the rear light.

 

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evilamnesiac

Joined:

Oct 05

Posts: 530

evilamnesiac says:

Shaft drive,

Shafts are great for touring/sportstouring style bikes as the outright power and low weight required of a sports bike isn't part of the attraction of these bikes, yes for sports bikes shaft drive is a no no, adding the extra 10-15kg for a decent shaft set up is a huge chuck of weight to a GSXR, and the loss of power equally noticeable when all you gain is not having to oil a chain its a waste. but for touring & adventure bikes , which are significantly heavier anyway, shaft drive is great, putting large amounts of power through a chain when the bike is as heavy as a pan for example will wreck even the strongest chain. so the loss of power is negligable as you can put a more powerful engine in to compensate, on a large motorcycle the trade off works. its horses for courses, and with the improvements in shaft design over recent years and the increasing power of motorcycle engines its becoming more and more practical to have a shaft drive on most machines.

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ruta40ar

Joined:

Sep 10

Posts: 7

ruta40ar says:

another heavy duty

Uf, another bike with 260kg like "superteneree" or GS1200?

Why not a new Africa, young, healthy, and light...this to go far in "ripio" roads ...

( 21 not 19 front wheel)

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DoomedDog

Joined:

Jul 10

Posts: 390

DoomedDog says:

Shaft Drive

Is shaft drive really so cumbersome? BMW's HP2 sports bike has a kerb weight of 199kgs. I've ridden the R1200S (predecessor to the HP2) and thought it was a cracking bike to ride and certainly didn't notice any drawbacks to speak of with the shaft drive. i enjoyed riding that R1200S just as much as my RR4 Blade and Hayabusa.

As far as lubing a chain, Wurth Dry Chain Lube is the way to go, the anodising on the teeth of the rear sprocket on my Blade is still there even after 2000 miles of use, and, there's none of the gunk and mess you get with other types of chain lube ending up on the rear wheel.

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mcned

Joined:

Jun 10

Posts: 25

mcned says:

Moving on...

Looks like some bikes are better suited to chain and others to shafts then....ditto their riders....anyway, I think it's good that the likes of Honda are broadening their appeal to more riders. It is good for biking and ergo good for us all.

How about non-crotch rocket version of the Blade...not detuned but with a Fazer riding prosition....same weight and power....now that I'd buy....

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