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Anonymous

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Phil West  says:

Triumph Tiger 800XC - 'the best all-round adventure bike in the world'

Like most, I watched Ewan and Thingey’s ‘Long Way Round’. And like many I’ve harboured fantasies of traversing the globe on an adventure bike, picking up enough tales of diseases and delicacies along the way to blow the kids inheritance but generate a lifetime of pub talk.   But unlike the vast majority I’ve been lucky enough to actually ride, at...

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  • Posted 4 years ago (16 November 2010 12:21)

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stRickly

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 35

stRickly says:

Regardless of bikes designed for a particular purpose looking similar geometrically, certain styling cues can set them apart. However, before any body else says that the new Tiger XC looks like the BMW GS's might I suggest looking into trail bike history. BMW "borrowed" styling ideas from Suzuki whose first trail bike with a beak appeared in 1988. Remember the DR750 & then DR800 (1990)?

The new Tiger looks like a great effort from Triumph with a very favourable (relatively speaking) price tag.  Personally, any more than 1cylinder and all that power would be a liability for me off road or even on slimey winter roads. I suppose it depends on how you use these modern "Adventure" bikes and what resources you have to hand (ie. healthy bank balance!). Some of us (who own bikes that are more than just weekend toys) do have to think in terms of mpg, service costs, ease of DIY maintenance/availability of spare parts, proven reliability and even fuel range. I've only owned trail bikes and all - apart from an Africa Twin - have been singles because of the afore mentioned considerations.
I may only be a lowly courier and not a globe trotting, desert bashing adventurer but my requirements are the same as the design requirements for a dependable & economical Trail bike (or Adventure bike if you must call it that) and in March 09 I was in need of a new bike. It very quickly became clear that only one bike fitted my requirements - XT660Z Tenere. (60,000 courier miles later and still going strong.) I wait with interest to read about the real world ownership costs and reliability of the new Tiger.

Anyway, good luck to Triumph and I'm sure it will sell well but it would be great to see a new British single and not just a Jap engine in a British frame (CCM).

 

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daveb

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Aug 02

Posts: 59

daveb says:

I've actually ridden an adventure bike off-road - an 1150GS Adventure - through South America; and most of that was two-up. On the same adventure was a 70-something and he coped just fine picking up a fully laden GS - it's all about technique (and friends!). If you actually believe that you need a lightweight single, then you don't really have any conception of what's out actually out there. And if you fancy doing 2500 miles on a buzzy single then good luck to you. I think Triumph's bike looks great and will doubtless perform well - there are even Triumph dealers in Chile these days!

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PhatPhred

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Nov 10

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PhatPhred says:

The world's best compromise?

Phil West, what did Triumph pay you to make such a patently absurd statement? The bike hasn’t exactly been around for long enough to prove itself to anyone in any respect, and on paper, it certainly is not the “best all-round adventure bike in the world”. When compared with the bike to which it pays homage (which isn’t the best adventure bike either), it is heavier, lower, has higher centre of mass, has a wet sump, and above all, its torque and power characteristics are even more road biased than those of the F800GS, and so is its steering geometry. So it’s more powerful than the F800GS; whoop-de-doo. How much more do you want to spin the wheel on dirt roads? Sorry mate, you’ve been smoking your socks again.

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sj_edinburgh

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Apr 04

Posts: 89

sj_edinburgh says:

I'm afraid you'll never get anyone to agree what is the ideal adventure bike, because the this sort of bike means so many different things to people. Some are just looking for a big reliable commuter capable of handling the odd pothole. Others are wanting something with genuine off road ability. Other just want a long distance touring bike. Some even argue what's you catagorise as off-road, are we talking unpaved roads or "proper" offroad, something a 4x4 couldn't navigate or which even a mule might struggle. I guess that's why some will insist on a 1150GS, whereas some would be happier with an XR400 with a big fuel tank.

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MudDoctor

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Mar 10

Posts: 118

MudDoctor says:

If you read the interview

with Triumph, they started working on this bike before the F800GS was launched, so I'm not sure that the suggestion that they copied it is valid. As others have said, most bike types follow certain design cues, such as sports bikes, trail bikes, cruisers. It's what sets them apart from the other types. At least Triumph don't have wonky headlights, although it could be said that that's what sets the BMW apart from the others.

As for criticising MCN for it's "Best Adventure Bike" headline, well I sem to remember that a similar headline was made throughout the biking journalist world  about the BMW S1000RR, long before any comparison tests were made.

I have had to pick my (laden) R1200GS Adventure up twice, and managed both times on my own. As someone else said, it's technique more than brute strength, so I don't think that the diddy wee Tiger will present too much of a problem.

What defines an Adventure Bike anyway? Simply riding any bike from London to Cornwall might be considered an Adventure to some. For me it's the ability to run on both tarmac and offroad. I went to Gibralter from Edinburgh in 1992 on a ZX10, and noticed then that the majority of tourist bikers were running XT500's or Africa Twins or the like. While my bike had no problems at all with the roads, it was obvious to me that I was missing out on some spectacular scenery by being unable to go offroad. So when I came home, I bough an Africa Twin, and took it, with my wife, up to Aviemore and then offroad over the Grampians. Now that was an adventure!

My only problem with the Africa twin was that, after the power of the ZX10, it was a bit gutless. Thank you, Triumph then for producing the first Tiger, which had much better performance, but in the end was not nearly as able offroad.

What defines offroad? Personally, in this genre, it's the ability to use well beaten tracks, cross a river, and perhaps some loose surfaces. Purpose built offroaders can do the rest, because we're not looking for a mountain goat here.

I agree with others, in that I don't want a bike that excels offroad, but is uncomfortable and lacks the power for road use. Equally, I don't want a fine handling speed machine that can't cut it offroad. That leaves me with needing a compomise bike, and that, it would seem, is the new Tiger XC. So I've put my deposit down, and wait until next year before I get one (ABS Model).

I'm keeping the BMW though.

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stRickly

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 35

stRickly says:

What is an Adventure??

This is why I hate the term Adventure bike. An adventure could be anything thing from globetrotting on a C50 Cub to desert riding on a sportsbike with knobblies.

The thing is these type of bikes were spawned by the Paris-Dakar which is why so much fuss is always made about offroad ability. The P-D itself was conceived by Thierry Sabine on an XT500 and the new Dakar (South America) has interestingly come full circle such that all bikes over 450cc must have their power restricted to that of a 450 and from 2012 there will be an all out 450cc limit.

I don't think the new Tiger will be any less capable than 800GS as Triumph have obviously done their homework. What will make it worthy of the "best Adventure bike in the world" title though, cannot not be detemined by pre-launch road testing. That title requires long term/mileage ownership to prove (or not!) it's reliability and overall costs of maintenance etc......particularly as Hinkley have sod all heritige in this market.

Daveb: when was the last time you rode a single? There are very reliable 4 stroke singles about these days that have balancer shafts/weights. Sure there's gonna be more vibes than a multi cylinder bike but after 60,000 miles on my XT660Z I'm quite content given that I've got enough power to break the speed limit and have a 300 mile tank range. As I ride my bike to earn money, economy is equally as important as reliability. If you can afford the purchase price, running and maintenance costs (including full dealer servicing) of these 2 wheeled Chelsea Tractors then good luck to you.

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kl595

Joined:

Nov 03

Posts: 470

kl595 says:

Never had a bad Triumph yet. Reckon it will be a great bike. Never had an engine self destruct and as Triumph are recognised globally as a great brand it's unlikely anyone could think they are just shite.

Comments from eatscso1 and adavid are just total b*ll*cks

But........being as the Tiger 800 hasn't turned a wheel in public hands yet, it's a brave comment to say it's the best adventure bike in the world.

 

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lany

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Aug 02

Posts: 20

lany says:

Versus the GS800

I'm sure the triumph will sell well & in my view will be a better touring bike than the GS800, more power,  larger fuel tank, dual headlights. However the engine characteristics, higher revving/ lower torque, would suggest it will not be as capable off-road in difficult or sticky conditions when good pulling power at low speed are needed. .

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stRickly

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 35

stRickly says:

I don't think the torque/weight ratio will be an issue for the XC. Rear wheel torque is what is important and this can be radically increased by fitting a larger rear sprocket.

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Anonymous

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Anonymous  says:

KL595

I think you'll find the bike press documented the self destructing Triumph engines. Also, a mate had one "let go" on him.

 

But this is obviously more bollocks. Maybe my mate dismantled his engine and took photo's just to make it up???

 

The bollock speaking is NOT in my court...

 

eatcs01

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