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Anonymous

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Andy Downes  says:

Got a top money saving cheat…then let us know

There are many ways of saving money when motorcycling; some simple and widely known, others less so. If you have a brilliant way of saving cash while you ride then let us know as we are compiling a list of the best. A few we’ve already listed include: • Taking your own wheels off a bike before a tyre change to save money...

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  • Posted 4 years ago (28 January 2011 17:28)

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Cyclonite

Joined:

Oct 10

Posts: 306

Cyclonite says:

if you have a problem with your bike then search the net and bike specific forums before going to the dealer, you may be able to fix it easily yourself and save the £75 per hour fee.

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HerbertChapman

Joined:

Sep 10

Posts: 72

Don't buy 'motorcycle boots'

Buy rigger boots from a workwear catalogue like Scruffs or DeWalt.

Leather, waterproof, Steel toe, steel re-inforced sole and re-inforced ankle protection. They will last 10 times longer than a so called motorcycle boot and when the steel toe caps start to show through ( after about four  years ) they make it look like you might be a right, proper bastard.

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snev

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 7695

snev says:

you won't like it but.....

Go on MCN Web site , Then you don't have to pay £2 for the rag.

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JacquesWood

Joined:

Nov 10

Posts: 12

JacquesWood says:

No restriction certificate

I paid £400 to get my first motorcycle restricted to to 33hp. A simple pair of washers in the inlet manifold restricted my bike to 33hp. I was told that I was paying for the certificate of authenticity more than then washers. after a big crash I had last year I was never asked about the bike being restricted by either the police or the insurance. Weeks later a friend of mine was pulled for riding admittedly like a prat. he was asked to prove his motorcycle was restricted. he carried his certificate of authenticity with him at all times and was told it wasn't a valid document! he then had 7 working days to get the bike dyno'd and proved to be 33hp. a quick trip to a dyno later and a print out was given to the police station. that was accepted and he was given a slap on the wrist. So, what was to stop my friend forging the document or simply getting a copy from somewhere? save yourself the £400 and spend it on your bike instead.

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snev

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 7695

snev says:

I like the idea... but.

I really dont think my Busa could handle the 33bhp.

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bmwgs

Joined:

Mar 10

Posts: 1032

bmwgs says:

.

i would not wear rigger boots on a bike as the one i have use in the past bend round the ankles  my bike boots are 2years old and still going strong.

4 years ago when i had to get my bmw r100gs clamped down to 33bhp it cost a lot less then £500 to fit 2 big washer in 1 in each carb and i got given then paper work and got told it was the law and i could not do it my self . and the bike still pulled strong when i had my mate on the bike  then after the 2years were up i just took them put my self job done. plus if u do all the work ur self it will save u pouds

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Save money by

buying kit etc out of season during winter.

A haynes manual and some (decent) tools, possibly with some night classes at college, will help you do some of the work yourself. Tools aren't cheap, but good ones will last for years.

When checking electrical / engine management faults, look for corroded / broken / chafed wiring before getting it tested for codes etc. Sensor "failure" on a dignostic test is often down to wiring damage (no signal to ECU, confusing it).

Check what optional "extras" are listed on your insurance (legal expenses, recovery etc) and decide what ones you genuinely need.

When paying a bill (for m/c stuff, or owt else), some vendors impose a surcharge for paying by credit card (as opposed to debit card), so ask if you're not sure.

When buying kit, make sure you try it on PROPERLY. If you go home with it, and decide you don't like it, you might have a hard time returning it (how does a shopkeeper know a returned helmet hasn't been dropped when you try putting it back?). MAKE SURE you know their returns policy; "I didn't know" isn't an excuse - the rules are in the T&C's in the contract of sale. Failing that, ask: that's what the staff are there for.

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shuggie1

Joined:

Apr 07

Posts: 1554

shuggie1 says:

3 tips

1. Get a bike with Eastern European plates, then you can go through speed cameras / in bus lanes as often as you like, just like the guy who belts past me in Clapham most nights

2. Move abroad away from rip off Britain

3. Don't buy tyhe MCN Xmas special, with free calender / magazine (or whatever) becasue it costs more tha the normal issue (without the free insert)

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5LeafClover

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 38

5LeafClover says:

6 More Tips

1. Go on a diet. Better MPG and power to weight ratio. 

2. £10 high viz trousers turns a pair of kevlar jeans into all weather touring kit and can fold up small to fit into underseat pocket etc when the sun comes out. 
3. Regular use of good chain wax and FS365 to keep bike looking great and residual value high. 
4. Invest in good security devices and use them. 
5. Consider TPFT insurance. A small accident is a waste of a claim on fully comp, while with a large accident a bent up bike will be the last of your worries. In any case if you ride defensively, its usually the other driver's fault and you can claim off them. 
6. Get the right bike. Less cc is not always less cost. I got insurance quotes recently £260 for an SV650 vs £400 for a Ninja 250R. Also, the fuel economy of the BMW F650GS (I think?) is supposedly excellent .

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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5LeafClover

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 38

5LeafClover says:

oh and CRASH BUNGS!

Best tenner I ever spent was a pair of crash bungs. Return on investment of 40 times in the space of a few days.

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