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ulster0

Joined:

Feb 11

Posts: 3

ulster0 says:

Learner legal BSA Banatam?

I am currently considering a BSA Bantam D1, the 125 cc model.  My full motor car licence gives me provisional entitlement as I passed my car test about 20 years ago.  I have not taken a CBT test but could easily do so.

My question for those more knowledgeable than myself is this..... Will a D1 125 cc Bantam be learner legal, and how long can I ride as a learner on a CBT test?

I am considering taking training towards a full licence, but for the minute I am just dipping a toe in the water!

Thakns for any help

 

Steve.

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  • Posted 4 years ago (21 February 2011 18:15)

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used2bfast

Joined:

Aug 07

Posts: 4227

used2bfast says:

I don't think so

I think they have to be capable of 70mph? Not 100% sure. I am sure there is a list of bikes that qualify. I know some of the chinease bikes don't qualify either.

Try sending a pm to one of MCN's experts

Hope this helps

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jaffa90

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 9004

flookyk

Joined:

Oct 10

Posts: 180

flookyk says:

Steve

Your CBT lasts for 2 years, you can ride on L plates for those 2 years without passing your test, then you have to take another CBT to continue on L plates.

As for the BSA it is ot on the list but contane the DSA with full details of the performance and they should let you know.

The current list is here.

 

 

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ulster0

Joined:

Feb 11

Posts: 3

ulster0 says:

Think I understand it now!

Thanks for all replys.

I have been looking at some of the links and doing some research.....

I think that if I take the CBT test I will be able to ride the Bantam as a learner, I've just got to check its rated power output.

The full test issue is more complicated, becausae the Bantam is not big or fast enough.  I guess I can ride the Bantam to get a feel for it and then undertake training using a training centres hired bike? I would then take the test on a hired bike and thus be allowed to ride a larger bike.  I live in South East Cornwall so does anyone recomend any training providers I could talk too?

regards  Steve

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ragnar1

Joined:

Oct 03

Posts: 21

ragnar1 says:

bsa

the bsa will be ok to ride on a cbt, but not for a full licence.

get your cbt out the way and then do a A2 test on a CG125 or YBR 125 so you don't have to do another cbt and get rid of the L plates

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gjkt

Joined:

Jul 09

Posts: 441

gjkt says:

If you passed your car test

before 2001, you will already have a full moped license (including the entitlement to carry a pillion) and provisional motorcycle entitlement as part of that license. You do not have to do CBT to validate that moped entitlement or ride a 125 but you must display L plates on the 125.  Funnily enough, you will have to complete CBT before you take a test.

Whether your Bantam is suitable to learn on will depend on whether it's power exceeds the 14.7 bhp limit for learner 125's. It may not, however, be suitable for taking your test on as it may be too slow. 

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ragnar1

Joined:

Oct 03

Posts: 21

ragnar1 says:

bsa

the bsa will be ok to ride on a cbt, but not for a full licence.

get your cbt out the way and then do a A2 test on a CG125 or YBR 125 so you don't have to do another cbt and get rid of the L plates

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Beelady

Joined:

Jan 10

Posts: 3509

Beelady says:

My memory may be playing tricks,

but surely changing from a Bantam to something more modern to take a test on is going to feel very strange as the gearchange is on the opposite side. I found it quite strange to use a left hand gear change at first. I think you'll have enough to think about on the day without trying to do something completely different.

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ulster0

Joined:

Feb 11

Posts: 3

ulster0 says:

thank you

Hi, thanks again for all info, much appreciated.

I should clarify I dont actually have the Bantam yet, as It still at the "thinking about it stage".

My interest has always been pre war motor cars, but more recently I have been to some motorcycle events such as trial;s and speed hillclimbs.  If I am serious about motorcycling then I want to work towards the full test to allow riding of larger machines, BUT they would be older and most likely a little eclectic British machines.

The Bantam idea was to get me riding for a bit to see how things went and if it realy suited me.  It seems I can do this with just a CBT which is cost effective.  If I enjoy th is then of course I would like to work towards the full test.  I accept that the modern hire bike would be very different to anything modern and Jap, so I have to consider this.  Thanks for alll the advice.

p.s A conversation today has discussed the part ownership of a chair!  I am led to believe this would be even more unusual to ride!!

 

Regards Steve

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theprof

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 19

theprof says:

Bantam

I can see you have been doing your research but its still easy to get confused isnt it'

The List is for minimum TEST vehicles and doesnt relate to what you can ride on CBT. You need the vehicle to comply with construction and use legislation to ride it on the road obviously. The same goes for the minimum speed ( its 62) for A2

CBT allows you to ride up to a 125 with L plates for 2 years, after which you can take it again and get another two years and so on. As you rightly say you would not be able to take a full test on it. There are a number of reasons. Its power output is too low for a standard A2 so even if you could use it you would be restricted to Light motorcycle up to 125. The problem of brake lights, indicators , mirrors etc will come up too. 

It might just be that the most cost effective way , despite your love of the vintage bikes would be to get say , an older CG125. It would cost as much. It will meet all the test requirements, and if you were to go DAS it will have the gear lever on the same side and have indicators etc , as would the one you use for CBT

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