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Tannasfish

Joined:

Feb 11

Posts: 19

Tannasfish says:

Riding in Switzerland

Can anyone clarify the rules about buying a 'vignette' to enter Switzerland? Do you need one if you are not planning to travel on motorways and what constitutes a motorway?

I'm planning a trip to the French Alps and it's so much easier to go in and out of Switzerland but I'm reluctant to pay for a few miles on their roads.

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  • Posted 4 years ago (30 March 2011 10:43)

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johnrodgers

Joined:

May 09

Posts: 90

johnrodgers says:

Switzerland/Vignettes

There are only a handful of motorways in Switzerland,  and they are very clearly signposted (two main ones are N/S from Austrian/German border and one running E/W to Martigny plus I think the Simplon pass is classified as motorway)  if you don't use them you don't need a Vignette. Motorway sign is identical to UK. There is normally a good quality "A" road running parallel to all motorways so not difficult to avoid. Where are you entering Switzerland? The only place where avoiding a motorway may be a bit of an issue is entering Switzerland from the NE past Lake Konstanz, anywhere else I'd say don't bother.

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Tannasfish

Joined:

Feb 11

Posts: 19

Tannasfish says:

Switzerland

We are planning to try the Routes des Grande Alpes south and come back via the Route Napoleon. The easiest way to access the top of the southern route is to come from Calais through (or near to) Geneva. Any thoughts?

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johnrodgers

Joined:

May 09

Posts: 90

johnrodgers says:

Geneva

If you are coming from Calais you can turn off the motorway at the junction of the E17/A31 near Langres and head cross country to Besancon. From there head south towards Pontarlier and you will go across the Jura mountains before descending to Lake Geneva which will give you a breathtaking view of the Lake and cloud covered Alps in the background. When you reach the lake head left and follow it around pass Lausanne to Thonon Les Bains on the S. side of the lake and the start of the Route Des Grande Alpes or if you prefer hang a right and go through Geneva (I'd recommend going left- lot less traffic to deal with). There are no motorways involved in this route.

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neilybabe

Joined:

Mar 05

Posts: 64

neilybabe says:

vignette

Be warned , if you enter Austria at any time you will need one for all of the roads. The rules are enforced by  a private agency so they are pretty keen and the fines are high. As for Switzerland, if you plan to use any motorway it's advisable to buy one as the fines can be steep. You can buy them from petrol stations near the borders, make sure they only charge you for a motorbike, last time I bought one it was about £15.

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TheRedBarron

Joined:

Apr 09

Posts: 58

TheRedBarron says:

Clarification

Neilly

Just felt the need to clarify your recent post; are you suggesting that you need a Vignette in Austria for ALL roads?  This is a new one on me if that is what you are saying? You certainly do for their motorways, but as for their other roads, you certainly didn't a few months ago.  Has there been a recent change?

Subject to being told the rules have changed recently and I've missed it, the Austrian Vignette can be bought for shorter periods, so whilst more expensive for a year than Switzerland is less expensive for a bike ona short trip.  The Swiss Vignette is for the calander year

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neilybabe

Joined:

Mar 05

Posts: 64

neilybabe says:

Austrian vignette

Last time  in Austria was 3 years ago, and we were told by an Austrian biker in Germany that we had to buy a vignette for using all roads in Austria as opposed to just the motorways in Switzerland. He was also the chap who told us that the fines were imposed by a private agency on behalf of the government. We bought a weeks worth for I think 7 euros, not worth skimping on.

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johnrodgers

Joined:

May 09

Posts: 90

johnrodgers says:

Austria

I rode through Austria a couple of years back and Vignette definitely only required for A+S roads- Autobahns and Expressways, but at about 4 Euros for a ten day vignette or a little over double that for a month I thought it was pretty good value.

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philthewindsurfer

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 1019

what JohnRodgers said

10 day ticket for Austria is €4.5. I bought one last year even though I wasnt planning to use the motorway/A+S roads as it wasnt expensive. I ended up on the motorway due to a change in plans because of the weather.
In Switzerland there isnt a shorter period, you have to get a year one, so I didnt bother and stayed off the motorways.

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bsogri

Joined:

Jan 10

Posts: 89

bsogri says:

Swiss Vignette

You only need the Vignette on motorways in Switzerland I think it is about 25 Euros which is the road tax for a year, tough if you only need it for a few days/hours.

Austria vignette is for  motorways only and is available  for 4/7 days and is about £5 but they are not needed on normal roads

Quite a few of the passes in Austria charge you to cross them and a few of the motorways with tunnels etc charge you as well as your vignette robbing basaaaars

You could just take a chance and go without 

apart from that enjoy yoursell

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TheRedBarron

Joined:

Apr 09

Posts: 58

TheRedBarron says:

Tolls and Vignettes

Austria: Using the regular route over passes there is only one toll I've come accross, the Grossglockner (which is well worth the money).  There are alternate routes up most of the others.  Most tolls are on new roads and major tunnels and can/should be avoided on a bike.  I have never found the need to buy an Austrian Vignette - although they are reasonably priced.

Switzerland:  Bit of a rip off at about £25 for the Vignette, but if you want to avoid riding through the busiest parts of the country on congested roads then you are going to need one.

Incidentally, anyone found a sensible way of attaching the Swiss Vignette to your bike?

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