Skip to content

Discuss This First ride: Vyrus Moto2 bike New bikes

You are in... Forums > Discuss This > New bikes > First ride: Vyrus Moto2 bike

This is a discussion topic

This discussion topic is linked to an article on this site. You can navigate to the article by clicking on the article name in the first post.

Go to most recent reply

Anonymous

Joined:

Posts:

John Westlake  says:

First ride: Vyrus Moto2 bike

Vyrus are testing their new Moto2 bike at Misano, so Senior Road Tester Michael Neeves has joined the Italian firm to ride the innovative bike on track. Here are his first impressions: 'This is one of the most unconventional Moto 2 machines made so far. It has a carbon fibre monocoque chassis, hub centre steering and a Formula One style rear...

Reply to this Topic  
  • Posted 3 years ago (20 July 2011 15:21)

Post a message in New bikes

Fields marked with an asterisk * are required

   

Please note. You cannot submit more than 4000 characters as a message.

Upload image(s) from your computer (up to 3 images)

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

Terms of use

Use of our community areas and forums is subject to important terms of use. By joining our community and using the features you agree to be bound by these terms. See terms of use below. 

Cancel
racinjetford

Joined:

Nov 05

Posts: 93

racinjetford says:

oops - sorry X2

I just looked at your post again, and I'm not sure what I THOUGHT you said, but my response didn't seem to have much to do with what you actually said. My point was just that there are many more variables than just suspension between other bikes and a BMW. But I see what you're saying about imagining less feel with the suspension connecting further from the hands... Maybe the front shock will still transfer road texture upward somwhat directly. Or maybe there would still be a lot of communication to the rider (with the stiff carbon subrame in front), and maybe they would just need to learn how to decipher what they are feeling if it is much different. Maybe different won't be a bad thing once they've learned the machine. Hard to say without riding it

Reply to this Topic
X2Glider

Joined:

May 10

Posts: 427

X2Glider says:

sorry Raceinjetford

Actually the telelever and duolevers "are" the difference in "feel" from a telescoping fork.

When a suspension compresses on a telescoping fork, the force vectors are directed through the clamps, steering tube and into the bar clamps.  You have dive and all the vibes that the forks don't dampen out going in a direct vector to your palms.  You can feel if the tire is chattering or sliding.

When you have a system such as the BMW's, the force vectors are redirected through the control arm and into it's pivot.  The shock in the middle of the control arm sends the forces through to the upper shock bushing and into the steering subframe which is further behind the bars by about 10".  The upper clamp is nothing more than a mount for the bar risers.  No suspension forces are directed to the bars.  Anything you do feel gets directed through the steering subframe and "direct feel" is strangely diffused into something almost incomprehensible by the time the vibes hit your palms.   On the R bikes with telelevers, the rider is also not that far away from the front wheel.  My R1150GS and R1100S puts me in no different of a distance from the front wheel than does a Triumph Bonneville or any other standard. 

The K1200S and K1300S I've ridden a few times isolates the riders hands from the suspension even more, directing forces through the 4 bar linkage and into a steering subframe.  You don't feel much going on down a bumpy road, but when you look down, you can see it working.

Yes, on a huge touring bike like a K1200LT where the bars are pulled back a whole foot, none of this would translate to you.  That is a very long bike with the rider quite far from the from the front wheel so feel is diminished no matter what kind of front end you have.  BMW makes more than big touring bikes so the K touring bike is a poor comparison.  I'm comparing sport for sport.

Reply to this Topic
X2Glider

Joined:

May 10

Posts: 427

X2Glider says:

looks like I posted after your last response.

You rebutted correctly about understanding how feel is diminished when your hands are further away from the suspension action.  Hopefully my further analysis explained what I was trying to convey.

Reply to this Topic
zhongwoe

Joined:

Jul 11

Posts: 3

zhongwoe says:

http://www.jordanforworld.com

very good web,believe you will love it. FREE SHIPPING,accept pyapal discount including evisu jeans,watches shirts,bags,hat and the decorations trust me! Quickly snapping up right

Reply to this Topic
Kescheng

Joined:

May 06

Posts: 89

Kescheng says:

Still Won't Win

Eltomo


Far from not getting my head around as a Chief Engineer I have absolutely no problem with understanding this system - which clearly you do not. Engines are reliable but there is a general consequence of adding more parts to any system in that it adds to the potential of a failure. There are many, many cases of unreliable engines - even in this modern world. Honda over engineered the V4 engines after their initial failures. British bikes in part failed in the 70's because people became tired of having to fix them. With this steering system inevitably there will be a greater failure rate than a conventional fork system. As for feel - well duh? Think about it if you can. You are disconnected from the front tyre by a series of linkages and ball joints. You just won't have the same feel on this type of system. That's not going to be a big problem if the advantages outweigh this disadvantage - but I doubt there are enough positives to win over the forks. Races are won and lost in the corners if straight line speed is reasonably similar. In corners this system does not add any advantage and may be a large minus as flexibility will be reduced as well as feel. However I remain to be disproved and if at the end of the season this bike is a winner, then I will bow to your superior knowledge.

Reply to this Topic
racinjetford

Joined:

Nov 05

Posts: 93

racinjetford says:

X2

thanks for explaining. After I re-read your previous post I realized what you were getting at, and I agree nothing puts the "axle in your hand" like telescopic forks do. Though I do wonder if mechanical grip can be improved with this setup? And if so, could a rider use the extra potential if they can't feel that it's there?

Reply to this Topic
racinjetford

Joined:

Nov 05

Posts: 93

racinjetford says:

kescheng

What leads you to believe the positives of this system will not likely outweigh the negatives you have listed? It seems that we really don't know the positive points yet ... I would think the big concern would be rider confidence, but MCN seems positive so far. Maybe their Moto2 rider will get along with it as well. How much extra mechanical grip could be generated by this system if it allows the suspension to freely absorb bumps while hard on the brakes? Riders sometimes have to avoid the ideal lines to avoid bumps that would cause them to lose the front. ...I'll admit though, I am biased. I want this to succeed because I think it looks really cool and I want it to run at the front. I even think it could generate new interest in the sport from outsiders who come across this thing racing and stop to watch instead of changing the channel :)

Reply to this Topic

Page

Compare Insurance

Save money by comparing quotes. It's quick and easy

Motorcycles for sale

 

It's only £13.99 to advertise your motorcycle on MCN

Sell your Motorcycle