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Anonymous

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Stefan Bartlett  says:

MCN IAM Better Riding Guide: A planned system of riding

Approaching riding in a planned way will quickly help you to improve your motorcycling skills. It will help you spot hazards earlier and plan your progress in an efficient way. Hazards you may encounter can range from physical features such as junctions, roundabouts, bends and hill crests, to the movements of other road users, changes in the road surface and problems that...

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  • Posted 4 years ago (26 August 2011 16:12)

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Rogerborg

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Sep 09

Posts: 887

Rogerborg says:

@Room 101

[Massive screed of hectoring didactic lecture]

I think you've made your point, although it might not have been the one that you intended.

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Room101

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Oct 12

Posts: 64

Room101 says:

yawn - you still have nothing to say!

… so what’s your point Rogerborg? Oh, that’s right, you still don’t have one – neither do the other cheerleaders! And I’m hectoring am I and you’re not! You’re a joke. And a previous comment of yours referred to spods paying lipservice to a system (a ‘spod’ being British slang - one who spends an inordinate amount of time exchanging remarks in computer chatrooms or participating in discussions ), and you’re the one with the MCN Gold Badge for your numerous posts, yup, take a look in the mirror mate! You all have nothing positive to offer or say, just more childish inane comments at people who do have something positive to offer. You just prevent others wanting to ask their questions or contribute for fear of ridicule, that's your sad contribution to biking today.. Why do you guys even bother with your stupid comments? There is a section on this forum just for that isn’t there – why don’t you all just go and play in that playpen. MCN has thousands of readers and loads of bikers are actually interested in learning to take their riding to a higher standard, and might actually want to discuss it on a non IAM or Rospa forum – but the same old MCN Gold, Silver, Bronze badge spewers of drivel feel the need to contribute sarcasm, negativity or nothing on what is a serious or interesting subject. It's interesting to note the cheerleaders here seem to get a bit sarcastic and sensitive when someone actually tells them / you how it is don’t you think. Why don’t you all just p1ss off to your playground and let people talk about riding here. (and it's obvious I made my point perfectly, and it's still obvious you have no point to make at all!) ~ please don't bore us with more of your smartass asides girls, can we please discuss advanced riding.

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Room101

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Room101 says:

oops

Sorry – did I just credit you with a Gold badge when you only have a Silver, I got you confused with your other buddy. You must try harder Rogerborg, some people puke even more inane crap than you!

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snev

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Jan 11

Posts: 8122

snev says:

 Room101,  accusing RogerBorg of having a "buddy". that's so wrong.

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De Puniet

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Sep 08

Posts: 11

De Puniet says:

Had a corking time

Had an absolutely brilliant time during my observations and test and learnt loads.  I didnt know how to ride  properly and safely on country roads and didnt really understand my limitations. I was caught doing 130 by the police and somehow was let off. The officer made me realise I didnt know what I was doing. I thought because I was fast, I was good. I took the course shortly after.  The course helped me become more realistic. Incidentally my average speeds are up and I enjoy my motorcycling far more.

I am now training to become an IAM observer and have learnt even more. Teaching others is a great way of becoming a happier smoother rider I have found. I understand some of the criticism but in my humble opinion I cant recommend it enough.

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Room101

Joined:

Oct 12

Posts: 64

Room101 says:

some further info - hope it helps someone

De Punit. I had a similar positive experience to yours. I’d ridden for many years, all sorts of bikes, including some track time. Took the course many years ago, that improved my riding no end (even though I don’t think I was ever a bad rider) and probably even saved my skin a few times since. I never hesitate to recommend bikers giving the IAM riding course a bash (or any other), its always surprising what others pick up on as its hard to check your own riding. I recently did some voluntary checkrides recently (as I did my advanced yonks ago) came through it with an easy pass level and my senior observer / class 1 had some constructive criticism on my riding which I have now corrected. (re my overtaking, following and overtaking distances, things you cant easily lift from a book, things someone needs to check you on) Re the subject in hand in this weeks article, I personally hate acronyms like IPSGA. They can make a simple thing look complicated. It looks even worse when you look at the details behind it, but like learning to ride a bicycle its all second nature within months, and you wont go back to your old way of riding. The detail behind each stage can be found here in this download http://www.iam.org.uk/images/stories/downloads/groups/stationery/ipsga%20set.pdf (please don’t get put off my all the verbage and diagrams guys, its much easier riding out for a few weeks with an observer telling you what’s good and bad at the McDonalds debrief, but some might like reading, so I hope it helps) When you combine this with using the limit point you can really get a safe shift-on whether you’re doing townwork or twisties. I know I can crack-on taking out the traffic in a way I don’t think I did before. That’s good enough for me. I think many of the clubs do a free checkride for those interested, it’s worth asking.

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snev

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 8122

snev says:

bugger me room101

You actually didn't insult anyone then.... Your not related to McRaven by any chance???? BTW... Opinions are like Assholes... We've  all got one... but some of us wipe ours... Now repeat after me  Two wipes forward......!:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

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Room101

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Oct 12

Posts: 64

Room101 says:

snev, do you have anything worth listening to?

Seems like mcraven had you sussed out before I did snev, and on behalf of everyone interested in advanced riding thanks yet again for your intelligent contribution.

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GrahamMarsden

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Jun 12

Posts: 14

If there's anyone reading who's actually interested in listening to anything other than the carping from those who think that arse wiping is the height of humour, here's my experience:

 

I'd always wanted a bike since I was a teenager, but didn't have the money then. About 5 years ago I suddenly thought "I've got the money, I've got the time and I don't want to be sitting here in 10 years thinking 'why didn't I do it?'" so I took my Direct Access.

 

So then I had a bike and was having fun, however realised after a couple of years or so that I could certainly ride better, but I didn't know how.

 

I could, of course, have just gone on what I was doing learning by trial and error (and hoping that one of those errors wouldn't be terminal!) but instead I looked around the web and found the Solent Advanced Motorcyclists.

 

I went to one of their SAM Sunday events (where they do free Assessed Rides on the first Sunday of each month between March and November) got a ride (with the Chief Observer no less!) and at the end of it came away with some very useful advice and a much better appreciation of what I and the bike were capable of.

 

So I joined, did my Observed Rides, passed my Advanced Test and, without buying a pipe or slippers or even a BMW, I'm having a *LOT* more fun riding *and* doing it more safely than I was too.

 

But, even now, I know that there's more to learn having done Slow Riding Courses, given Motorcycle Gymkhana events a try and been out on Level 3 rides with some extremely good riders.

 

 

So you can either follow the "advice" of the soi-disant Riding Gods on here and think you know it all and have nothing to learn from anyone or turn down the ego a bit and get some Advanced Training and, who knows, you may actually learn something you didn't know before.

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Rotop

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 124

Rotop says:

System

Disagree with a tiny portion of IAM - YOU MUST BE A RIDING GOD THEN?! MOVE OVER ROSSI! YOU KNOW EVERYTHING ABOUT EVERYTHING! No. Just beacause people hold a different view to you doesn't mean that they believe themselves superior. nobody here has claimed to be superior and everyone here has more to learn. Stop the bullshit please. I'm gonna have to side with the camp that has some questions about advanced riding. even if it is only because they haven't resulted to slander and logical fallacies.

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