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Anonymous

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Stefan Bartlett  says:

MCN IAM Better Riding Guide: A planned system of riding

Approaching riding in a planned way will quickly help you to improve your motorcycling skills. It will help you spot hazards earlier and plan your progress in an efficient way. Hazards you may encounter can range from physical features such as junctions, roundabouts, bends and hill crests, to the movements of other road users, changes in the road surface and problems that...

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  • Posted 4 years ago (26 August 2011 16:12)

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James600zx

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 2820

James600zx says:

Think.

You can't have it both ways. On the one hand you're trying to embed good practice so that it is second nature and then you're fussing over whether to use the indicators or not. Just do it and free yourself to observe and think about the environment which you have no control over. I'm not the one who is missing the point.

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Room101

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Oct 12

Posts: 64

Room101 says:

We are arguing the specifics and missing the big picture

The problem we have here on this forum discussion (again) is that we have some people who want to ask a serious question (hidden in their cynicism sometimes) and even more people who (for whatever reason – it’s their issue, please don’t make it ours) are anti advanced riding, the IAM, Rospa or whatever. Every question could be answered and I’m positive that would just generate more questions because as has been pointed out, this article and your questions, are just one very small part of a much larger system (which with the IAM or Rospa it takes weeks to learn so to answer here fully is next to impossible). I have seen before peoples frustration with riding with advanced riders and believing they take unnecessary risks etc. as they plough through the traffic or somehow are able to go down your favourite twisties faster than you. Its because they’ve been taught to do that, and you wont be able to see what they are doing or thinking. Take an easily understood mentioned example of going over a blind summit, an advanced rider will be picking daisies, adjusting speed and position and reading the roads ahead by using non road references. Someone watching that wont be able to see that. Going down twisties an advanced rider will be planning, positioning and using references that others cant ‘see’ or more accurately ‘maybe not thinking about’, no its not xray vision, it’s a load of common sense and simple stuff they’ve been taught which all comes together on riding strange twisties for example. And advanced riders aren’t perfect or better than non advanced, my experience of them is they are the first to admit that, they practice it with group ridouts, go on extra riding courses and take retests to make sure they are up to snuff. Its amusing (defensive?) how the anti naysayers try and paint another picture via their inaccurate ignorant comments. The IAM in a way have not done themselves a favour by publishing weekly snapshots, it has allowed the naysayers to leap on specifics that are answered if you read the whole series published in other weeks on MCN (or obviously answered if you did any advanced riding course, IAM, Rospa or whatever). For those interested in picking daisies etc then take a look here …. http://www.mikewaite.co.uk/factsheets/ and http://www.mikewaite.co.uk/video/free-video-extracts/blind-summits-high/ What I cant understand here is the naysayers continual boring advanced-riding bashing. What gives with that? I can understand people asking questions and challenging (in fact that’s the healthy thing to do) but to be openly so anti and negative towards something the posters obviously have no or limited experience of is not just unnecessary, something of benefit to bikers – it’s just plain childish and dumb. Did someone say ‘mass delusion rah rah club’? Well I think I can identify that on here, but I’d call it the ‘mass delusion ignorant rah rah club’ for greater accuracy, and the stupid little cheerleaders of that club stand out like a sore sorry thumb. Just more cheap negative comments from people who have loads to say but nothing to contribute. p.s. James, you do have a point, ‘you’ could argue the indicator specific from the IAM point or yours, no system will be seen as perfect when it contains instructions such as ‘should’, but on the whole the system does work. Even advanced riders and instructors challenge it on a weekly basis just as you do, we do that to improve it. It cost about £140 to do the IAM course which includes exam and reading materials etc. about the same cost of a track day, maybe give it go, bite your tongue like I did for the first four crazy nonsensical weeks then I think your question and many more would be answered as it all comes together. You might even be surprised to find your R1 and ZX fit right in, its not all panniers and beards : - ) thank God.

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ajdubas

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Feb 12

Posts: 11

ajdubas says:

Two Things

There are a few select cases where you might not signal your intentions and I would say it is much better practice to consider *not signalling* rather than the converse. I would also be interested as to why it suggests block changing rather than using engine braking.

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GrahamMarsden

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Jun 12

Posts: 14

@James600zx

"On the one hand you're trying to embed good practice so that it is second nature and then you're fussing over whether to use the indicators or not. [...] I'm not the one who is missing the point."

 

Erm, I think you've just *got* the point, ie that it's the good practice that *becomes* second nature so you don't have to "fuss over whether to use the indicators", you're constantly scanning and observing, getting as much information as possible such that your consideration of whether to indicate or not is an automatic part of the process, rather than an automatic habit of always indicating no matter what the situation.

 

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GrahamMarsden

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Jun 12

Posts: 14

@ajdubas

Yes, there are times when you would consider not signalling, generally in a situation when an indicator could confuse another road user.

 

 

As regards Block Changing, the advice these days as it says is "Gears to go, Brakes to slow", not least because using engine braking doesn't, of course, give a visible clue of a brake light to a following vehicle that you're slowing down.

 

There's also the argument that it's cheaper to replace brake pads than a gearbox or clutch if you're constantly using them and requires less mechanical input to pull the clutch in once and flick down a number of gears instead of clutch in, down a gear, clutch out, engine brake, clutch in...

 

There are times when it's recommended you use engine braking eg in slippery conditions, of course, like all such things, it's a guideline rather than a hard and fast rule.

 

PS @Room 101: If you press return twice at the end of a paragraph you get nice formatting instead of a solid block of text :-)

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Bolfunga

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Aug 07

Posts: 13

Bolfunga says:

The thing I find most disappointing about this series of comments is that the majority of those expressing opposition to advanced riding theories, courses, and riders, have obviously already made their minds up NOT to ever explore any advanced riding coaching.


This is particularly unfortunate, because a lot of the same naysayers are undoubtedly competent, and certainly passionate, riders. Equally, although their views are in some opposition to my own, they are evidently already “thinking” and most definitely “challenging” riders, and this is especially true in the case of James600zx.


There is absolutely nothing wrong with questioning an aspect or aspects of any philosophy you see no value in. The signalling question is a prime example. The fact of the matter is if you choose to signal out of habit the world will not come to a grinding halt; signalling routinely won’t even see you fail an advanced test. In and of itself it’s simply not that important. (By the way, it is important to note that a flashing indicator does not mean that the shields have been activated as some here seem to believe. A blinking lamp is simply that; it’s not a safety feature.) Anyway the point is, as has been said a number of times, the way in which signals are used is an outward demonstration of how and if the rider is considering his/her every move in relation to the on-going and developing situation. A “thinking rider” is just that, a rider who thinks; as far as possible nothing will be left to chance, everything possible will be considered in advance, and every metre travelled will be planned.


As for James600zx, I think you’d really enjoy a Skill for Life course with the right IAM affiliated group. I’d certainly welcome you on a course I was observing because, if experience has taught me one thing, it’s that riders like you, riders who care enough to challenge and question, quickly see the value and quickly develop into bloody good advanced riders. More often than not they also go on to make excellent observers. Try it, you might surprise yourself :O)
 

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DorisM77

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Oct 12

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DorisM77 says:

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Rotop

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 124

Rotop says:

Advanced riding...(2)

generic advanced riding test 101. Q1. What is the correct procedure when approaching a roundabout? A. Check mirrors, adjust position & speed, accelerate onto roundabout, check mirrors & blind spot and accelerate off roundabout. B.Barrel onto roundabout at 70mph, crash bike. C.Don't check mirrors, adjust position to underneath the 4x4 overtaking you. D.Check mirrors, adjust position & speed, decelerate onto roundabout ... Wait for a tow? That'll be £140 please.

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Rotop

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Sep 12

Posts: 124

Rotop says:

re-do

generic advanced riding test 101. Q1. What is the correct procedure when approaching a roundabout? A. Check mirrors, adjust position & speed, accelerate onto roundabout, check mirrors & blind spot and accelerate off roundabout. B.Barrel onto roundabout at 70mph, crash bike. C.Don't check mirrors, adjust position to underneath the 4x4 overtaking you. D.Check mirrors, adjust position & speed, decelerate onto roundabout ... Wait for a tow? That'll be £140 please.

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snev

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Jan 11

Posts: 8098

snev says:

yep...

I'm Defo going to write a guide . now, was it two wipes forward?

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