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Anonymous

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Stefan Bartlett  says:

MCN IAM Better Riding Guide: A planned system of riding

Approaching riding in a planned way will quickly help you to improve your motorcycling skills. It will help you spot hazards earlier and plan your progress in an efficient way. Hazards you may encounter can range from physical features such as junctions, roundabouts, bends and hill crests, to the movements of other road users, changes in the road surface and problems that...

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  • Posted 4 years ago (26 August 2011 16:12)

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wobblybiker

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 78

wobblybiker says:

Riding position

On cornering their guide has this to say:

The angle between your forearms and the fork legs should be as close to 90° as is possible.

I question if that is even possible let alone advisable.

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Rotop

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 124

Rotop says:

Fork leg elbow?!

I try to get to 75°  for normal riding, maybe stretch to 80° on a sunday blast.

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snev

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Jan 11

Posts: 8637

snev says:

room 101

Just spent 4 days in Swindon 3 minutes riding in the town, then I came accross the "Magic Roundabout" well....Bugger me backwards... I didn't have a Bloody Clue what to do but remembered the IAM Advice so I spent 3 and a half days "Planning my way" across the 7 Mini roundabouts and can safely say IAM  now , a Riding GOD. :smile

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GrahamMarsden

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Jun 12

Posts: 14

@wobblybiker Re: Elbows

What it actually says is "The closer to 90 degrees the angle of your forearms are to that of the fork legs, the more efficient your steering inputs will become".

 

What it means is that if you're leaning forward with your arms virtually straight and your weight pushing down on your wrists (so your forearms are near parallel with the forks), it's going to be very difficult to steer, whereas if you grip the tank with your thighs (so your abs and back muscles support your body) your elbows and forearms will naturally drop and be more relaxed so steering will be much easier.

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4781

philehidiot says:

Yeh

whether you believe it in or not, the best part is that it is being debated.


The IAM book is very simplified and not as integrated as Motorcycle Roadcraft. Personally I've found that the advanced stuff helps me increase my speed / progress most of the time. But there are times where you want to switch it off and you can do.

In my job, for example it's much better to be able to predict the oncoming cardiac arrest so you can be prepared for it rather than responding to it without knowing. Advanced riding is about that kind of thing.

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domster

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Sep 12

Posts: 212

domster says:

Block gearchanging?

Dangerous twaddle, If you're not always in the correct gear you're not in proper control of the vehicle and able to take avoiding action when necessary.

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philehidiot

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Feb 09

Posts: 4781

philehidiot says:

Roadcraft

says you can use either block or sequential. Block makes sense on some machines if you're slowing down to turn off and want to be in first. Sequential is frustrating on smaller machines and can wear out clutch, etc faster.


Myself I use sequential and then block if I'm stopping.

Block has its place, for example if you're braking hard for a corner in a straight line you might need to go down two gears depending on the gearing and engine size of the bike. Myself I rarely brake that hard unless I (or someone else) has fucked up.

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domster

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 212

domster says:

phil

Firstly,it's a machine, it wears out and needs maintenance, more power wears clutches faster. I'd say if you're unable to downshift sequentially fast enough and not performing an emergency stop you're either reckless, incompetant or on a race track.

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