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roddyo

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 1

roddyo says:

textile v leather

gloves and or jackets, question is which are more waterproof leather or textile

 I understand both can be porous and need to be proofed  is it down to individual items or is 1 material better than an other?

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  • Posted 3 years ago (05 October 2011 13:58)

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englishuser

Joined:

Jul 07

Posts: 65

englishuser says:

Textile v Leather

Textiles generally far superior in the rain and or cold. They are ofter more comfortable and easier to put on over your clothes etc. Leather still has better abration resistance than any man-made material when sliding down the road, although Dainese staff assure me that the latest textiles are not far behind these days. Topp spec waterproof gloves usually have leather on palm. Nice to have a set of both in the long run, but textiles the more practical of the two.

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bbstrikesagain

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 878

Which are more waterproof?

Most waterproof textiles have waterproof yet breathable membranes inside, either between the shell and lining or bonded to the outer shell. Decent quality waterproof breathable (Goretex or equivalent) textile gear does exactly what it says on the tin.

A very few, very expensive, leathers are genuinely waterproof, thanks to Gore-tex Pro-Shell, but AFAIK all other leathers eventually leak, though they may well be shower proof...

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nalaka

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 3

nalaka says:

textile v leather

The only instance where leather is a better option than textile is when 
 you're sliding down the road and then it's always superior. 

 In all other conditions a good brand textile wins out, they're warmer or 
 cooler depending on the liner being in or out.  They're waterproof or at 
 least more waterproof than leather, which is at best water resistant if 
 treated continuously. 
 Leather made to measure can be very comfortable but on the whole textile 
 wins out. 

 Good quality textile garments incorporate "armour" which improves their 
performance 
 in a crash situation but modern leather also has "armour" so they're always 
 going to be the better option once you've left the bike and are sliding, 
 shitting and shredding. 

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James600zx

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 2765

James600zx says:

Kit.

Textiles for me are a compromise too far.

I wear two-piece leathers for their abrasion protection. My Furygan jacket and Wolf perforated jeans with additional thin layering works well in all conditions.

I carry compact, cheapish, two-piece waterproofs to go over the top when necessary, although I find a faired bike offers some protection from wind and rain and it has to be properly raining before I need the thin waterproof layers. They're almost totally water and wind proof, although they're like a sauna if worn in less than severe conditions. They dry quickly though.

Winter gloves seem to lose their waterproofing and warmth fairly quickly so for the past few years I've kept my Alpinestars summer gloves, using silk liners. Most water ingress is through the cuffs so make sure your waterproof sleeves fit over the cuff, not under.

Torrential rain will eventually find a way in, admittedly. A buff around the neck helps to keep the cold out.

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steveb

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 808

steveb says:

Leathers

are generally far more aerodynamic. You will feel the difference between riding in leathers and riding in textiles (which tend to be more bulky) once you start to "push on" a bit.

Textiles are not allowed on track days.

Horses for courses though, if I'm only pootling about on my C90, then I would wear kevlar lined jeans and a light weight textile jacket, if I'm green laning I wear textiles, otherwise I wear 2 piece leathers.

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