Skip to content

Ask an Expert Good Affordable 125's Buying & selling bikes

You are in... Forums > Ask an Expert > Buying & selling bikes > Good Affordable 125's

Got something to say?

Got something to say?

Go to most recent reply

Smiffy83

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 13

Smiffy83 says:

Good Affordable 125's

Hi
As I am still new to the motorbike world and am looking to get my first bike, can anyone suggest any good affordable 125 bikes that they may have had in the past or know from experience? 

Many thanks in advance

Reply to this Topic  
  • Posted 3 years ago (05 October 2011 20:19)

Post a message in Buying & selling bikes

Fields marked with an asterisk * are required

   

Please note. You cannot submit more than 4000 characters as a message.

Upload image(s) from your computer (up to 3 images)

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

Terms of use

Use of our community areas and forums is subject to important terms of use. By joining our community and using the features you agree to be bound by these terms. See terms of use below. 

Cancel
MarcusMarsh

Joined:

Aug 09

Posts: 2714

MarcusMarsh says:

125's

Hi Smiffy and welcome.  Any 125 from the big Japanese companies will be a safe buy.  You may find that they hold their prices as as they are constantly in demand by learner-riders.  For the same reason you may also find that any bike you look at may have had several owners. 

As long as it is a sound machine don't be too fussy about your choice of model of 125 as, if the biking bug grabs you, you'll soon be moving onto something else. 

Reply to this Topic
Andy949494

Joined:

Feb 08

Posts: 817

Andy949494 says:

Agree but...

You probably need model names:
Basic but functional like the Honda CG125 (only available second hand) Honda CBF125 or Yamaha XBR125. Any of these are very good and will be within 5mph of the top speed of any other 125. If you have the money for a new or good second hand CBF125 or YBR125 you should get a good little bike that will faithfully run for ever and be cheap to run...
You tend to pay premium (in purchase price and insurance) for flashier bikes like the Honda CBR125 (sports style), Suzuki 125 Marauder (custom style). The flashiest 125 at the moment is the Yamaha YZF-R125 (Sports) although the Honda XL125 Varadero (Adventure) would give it a good run for its money. The bikes labelled sports are slightly faster than the rest but are much more uncomfortable around town. The Varadero is a pretty expensive beast as it is a V twin and pretty big. Its also more powerful than most (yes the law allows a bit of wiggle room) so its probably not too slow either... A lovely bike but if you intend to pass your test and buy another bike a bit over the top...
If you are young get some insurance quotes for these before deciding. The insurance can be quite different...

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

Reply to this Topic
AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Affordable 125s

how affordable is "affordable", ie what budget have you set?

Probably your best bet is Honda CG125 or Yamaha YBR125, cheap to buy, run and insure with loads of spares available and not much to worry about after the inevitable drop.

Hope that helps.

Reply to this Topic
kitspartan

Joined:

Jul 11

Posts: 14

kitspartan says:

Affordable 125's

I run a Motorcycle business, we get a lot of requests for 125's from new riders and commuters. We don't sell new bikes yet, I'm looking to in the future as the supply of used bikes is somewhat sporadic.


Looking at the Japanese bikes objectively I have to say that the build quality is not up to the new asking price and they do loose a larger amount of value in money terms too even if the percentage is less.

We've just sold a 2004 Honda Verago 125 which had 5461 miles on it. It's a great bike on paper but it's not made in Japan. The fork seals had gone, pitting on the fork legs, play in the swinging arm, chrome flaking off the handle bars and rust on the exhaust. For a £4,400 125 this is awful. The bike had been looked after too.

On the positive side though it rides very well and the watercooled  V twin engine is very torquey and smooth. We sold it for £1,200 which was a real bargain price, all of the mentioned "mechaincal" faults put right of course.

The CBR125 is a great little bike I have to say, easy to ride too. The YBR 125 is OK but still overpriced when new. 

My advice would be if you have about £1,000 to spend look for a good used CBR orYBR .

Don't discount the Chinese 125's either, you can get a 1 year old one for about £500.

Malaguti make a great Yamaha engined trail bike which is about £1,500 new and it has some excellent components on it, ABS even. 

If you like cruisers the Honda Rebel 125 is a great but rare bike now. We found one for a customer and she loves it, £800 well spent.

If you want any more specific advice let me know.

I'd advise you to steer of 2 stroke 125's only because they need more frequent rebuilds and use more petrol. I'm a big 2 stroke fan, but if you want lower running costs go for a 4 stroke.

Best regards

Jon




Reply to this Topic
Smiffy83

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 13

Smiffy83 says:

Jon

Jon do you know anything about the Zontes Tiger 125?


Many thanks to you and everyone who has replied to this post.

:biggrin:


Reply to this Topic
darich

Joined:

May 11

Posts: 55

darich says:

CBF125

In my opinion the CBR and R125 look a bit silly......too skinny to be a real sports bike but both try hard.

I've got a CBF125 (59 plate). It has averaged 130mpg over 1800 miles and those miles have only cost my £80 in fuel. 1 year road tax bought at end of september.......£16.
Best mpg was 142mpg.....worst was 118mpg.

Quality wise I've nothing to compare against but have to say the bike so far has been fine and not been anything other than reliable.

When buying a 125 I think a lot of them will have been dropped because they're generally owned by new/inexperienced riders. I don't imagine that's a real problem as long as you know about it when you're buying

Reply to this Topic
CBRJGWRR

Joined:

Aug 11

Posts: 508

CBRJGWRR says:

125's

It depends on what you want.

Bikes like the CG125, and YBR125 are best for starting off, cheap to buy, to run (LESS than 100mpg means somethings wrong) Cheap parts.

A CBR125R is a good choice as a first sporty bike, handles well enough for kneedown lean angles (I got my knee down on the CBR125R before my CBR600F, and RS125) and also gives decent fuel economy 70 mpg if thrashed, with the potential to do 150 mpg, if you try hard enough.

2 Strokes are very quick, but all are abused, and because they can be derestricted, you need to ensure that they meet the 15 bhp limit, otherwise your licence and insurance are invalid. Competion grade 2T oil is not cheap,  and you should NOT run a 2 stroke racer on less.

 

You will drop your first (maybe even second or third) bike. Get a spares pile. There is no point saying I won't drop it. Everybody says that.

500 quid will set you up with complete fairing kit for a CBR125R, along with most bits that get broken with a drop, levers etc.

 

Once you pass the test, if you sell your 125 you will miss it.

Also, the DSA have a list of acceptable 125's for the test.  It is a good idea to get one of those.

The chinese bikes quality is still suspect, so leave alone until they improve, but they are cheap, starting new for 800 quid for the lexmoto CG125 copy.

All things considered, it is best to get a CG125, or YBR125. You will find yourself getting a sports 125 though.

Insurance isn't as bad as everybody makes out.

a CBR125 is 260 quid to insure in lincolnshire, and my old scooter was 250 a year.

An RS125 will cost up to 500 in the countryside, more in a city.

(for a 18 year old, 1 year no claims)

Ultimately, bear in mind, no matter what the other guy says, it has been dropped if it is used. In all probability crashed as well, and is unlikely to be well maintained either.

 

Price

CG125's start very used at 200 quid. YBR's about 800 quid, a CBR125 can be picked up for 400 quid, but mine was crashed badly by two of its owners (out of the four its been owned by) and the owner just wanted rid of it.

My RS125 was 200 quid because its owner hadn't realised you needed to pull the left lever in when changing gear, and ruined the gearbox. It has also been sized at least once, and was partially derestricted.

The standard market value of these two is nearly £3000 in total, so you can make money on your 125, but you WILL miss it.

 

If the 125 has one mature owner, riding since brit bike heyday, only used on sunny days out, with low miles, buy it. It will give far more peace of mind than any other 125, even a new one. (Fear of dropping your brand new bike)

Have fun. Everybody else did. 

You can wheelie, get your knee down, stoppie, and do any other trick on a 125. doesn't mean you should.

Reply to this Topic
CBRJGWRR

Joined:

Aug 11

Posts: 508

CBRJGWRR says:

Trackdays

You can take your 125 on track. it will teach you just how well your bike can go, stop and corner. And the limit of your abilities.

If you take a scooter on track the marshall will ask is that a paddock vehicle, or are you actually going to ride that?

 

Reply to this Topic
Smiffy83

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 13

Smiffy83 says:

CBRJGWRR

Hi


Just wanted to thank you for taking the time to post all the advice and tips. Its much appreciated. Its hard to know what to do for the best when starting out so a big thank you.


Reply to this Topic
CBRJGWRR

Joined:

Aug 11

Posts: 508

CBRJGWRR says:

Your welcome.

I know, I was going through all this a few years back, and some of it is from experience, some from what me dad told me (Ex riding instructor) rest is from talking and learning from people who are better than me. I don't know anybody else who watches motoGP for hints and tips on riding quick, rather than as a racing series for entertainment and spending huge amounts of money.

Let us know what your choice is.

There is bound to be someone else who owns one.

 

The best piece of advice we can give is to get something you won't mind dropping, as everybody drops their first bike.

A sensible all things considered picking will lead to a CG125/YBR125. We'll all tell you that in advance, whoever you ask.

 

At the end of the day, what you've got is two bags. one is called experience, the other is called luck.

one is full, (hopefully) and the other is empty, or nearly empty right now.

The plan is you fill one before the other runs out.

A good idea is to ask people what mistakes they made when they first started out, and that will give you things that you don't want to do.

Some examples:

1.     Don't try and put the thing in neutral by hand, with the sidestand up. (Stupid learner mistake. Ran out of petrol and forgot to put sidestand down, on first day of riding my rebuilt Honda CBR 125R. And I spent the whole summer cleaning it!)

2.     Make sure your tyre pressures are okay before riding. (Sounds obvious, is the cause of nearly all accidents which involve unroadworthyness.)

3.     Carry some money on the bike so that if you run out of fuel, there is always enough money to buy some - petrol stations aren't keen on letting you ride to the bank to with draw some money when you forget to get some before filling. (Yes that one was a personal mistake. I was heading to the bank, and thought I already had some money out for some reason.)

4.    Find out a bike's history before buying. (I knew the aprilia had problems with the gearbox, but not that its engine had been sized, and fixed dodgily.)

5.    While looking at someone elses bike before pulling away, remember to hold the clutch in. Stalling is not fun.

 

There are probably more. Those are the ones I can remember off the top of my head.

A whole list of things not to do can be found here:

http://www.msgroup.org/forums/mtt/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=167 

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

Reply to this Topic

Page

Compare Insurance

Save money by comparing quotes. It's quick and easy

Motorcycles for sale

 

It's only £13.99 to advertise your motorcycle on MCN

Sell your Motorcycle

Motorcycle pricing tool

New! Find used bike prices