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Anonymous

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MCN  says:

Riding in strong winds

The UK is likely to be hit with very strong winds over the next couple of days, with gusts of over 90mph expected in parts of Scotland and Northern England. Below are a couple of tips to help you ride in strong winds. Obviously, if the winds are too strong and you don't feel confident riding in such conditions, leave the bike...

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  • Posted 3 years ago (07 December 2011 17:38)

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SlowLearner

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 1953

SlowLearner says:

Another wind tip...

look way, way down the road, not at the sides to which you're being blown, and allow yourself to relax and let the bike correct itself. 

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theglovenor

Joined:

Jul 10

Posts: 22

theglovenor says:

Take the topbox off your Tenere.....

be even more wary of diesel on roundabouts etc as the wind can slide you sideways,espescially on trailie tyres in the wet....

 

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Mr. Luck

Joined:

Jan 08

Posts: 44

Mr. Luck says:

Photo..?

In the photo:

 

should we be holding our forks as well instead of the handle bars.....? this is a new concept to me...

 

Does it work...? PMSL

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DOCTIRED

Joined:

Oct 06

Posts: 55

DOCTIRED says:

fairings

If you have a choice, ride an unfaired bike, they are much less prone to sidewinds imho...........

Grabbing the fork leg to keep low is an old technique and effective if on a long straight run. In very cold conditions on motorways I used to bend down and grab my a10 exhausts occasionally in the 70s and it helped to keep my hands warm.......

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Carlosoul

Joined:

Jul 08

Posts: 165

Carlosoul says:

There is always wind...

when you ride head down arse up

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Bonly1

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 46

Bonly1 says:

should we be holding our forks as well instead of the handle bars.....? this is a new concept to me...
Does it work...? PMSL
 

NO, IT DOESN'T WORK!

And I think MCN ought to change that pic if it's giving the wrong impression?

Holding the fork leg is fine for aerodynamics when racing, but absolutely no use when it's windy as now.  Keep hold of your bars as normal, gusts will always hit you by surprise, grip more firmly when it hits you and lean into a side gust with your body as you would when cornering (NO, not knee down!) 'cos it's just like someone/something trying to push you the other way innit?  Anticipation / forward observation is everything at all times, espesially now - consider open spaces past buildings, mouths of junctions between buildings, approaches to bridges that you'll pass under besides those you'll be riding over, 'cos they'll all be more prone to gusts in those locations.  Wide open spaces don't give you the opportunity to anticipate, but if it's windy as now, you should be expecting the odd push shouldn't you?  Think about the last juggernaut that was coming the other way toward you at 60mph.... big blast of wind?  You dealt with it 'cos you anticipated.  What did you do?  Ducked a little?  Leaned a little?  Instinctively? Yeah, but it's just a little (lot) more exagerated in windy conditions.
If Old Bill were to clock you riding as 'DOCTIRED' appeared advocate, you'd be looking at a prosection for 'Not being in a position to have proper control'.  But I don't believe he meant it was ideal for windy conditions, just maybe for getting outta the cold and for warming hands.
MCN's photo is misleading - not the first or last time either :)

Ride safe - but if the conditions are dangerous like now - if you don't have to, then don't ride at all. Stay safe mate.

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snev

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 7686

snev says:

Bonly1

Wow dude, that was epic.

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Bonly1

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 46

Bonly1 says:

'Wow dude, that was epic.'

I'd like to elaborate, but I'm still PMSL

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Twentytoo

Joined:

Jul 09

Posts: 38

Twentytoo says:

It scares me

The only time I was ever scared in the wind was on the road from Malaga to Gibraltar where, in 2007 on a GS1200, not all the 'passes' had wind protection. Not been since so may still be the same but maintaining a lane was difficult...There are 4 bullet points here...Not challenging them but survival instinct taught them on the first pass...

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Piglet2010

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 2271

Piglet2010 says:

What about HGVs?

Surprised there is no mention of the effect of passing by a bus or HGV that is upwind; not to mention the buffeting from the turbulence when one is within a couple of vehicle lenghts behind such a vehicle in an adjacent lane.

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