Skip to content

TRIUMPH Triumph Explorer 1200: What do you want to know? TIGER 1200 EXPLORER

You are in... Forums > TRIUMPH > TIGER 1200 EXPLORER > Triumph Explorer 1200: What do you want to know?

This is a discussion topic

This discussion topic is linked to an article on this site. You can navigate to the article by clicking on the article name in the first post.

Go to most recent reply

Anonymous

Joined:

Posts:

Marc Potter  says:

Triumph Explorer 1200: What do you want to know?

Next week MCN is riding the new Triumph Explorer 1200 at its world launch in Spain, and we want to put your questions to the Triumph team who built the bike. The new 139bhp three-cylinder adventure bike uses an all-new engine, chassis and shaft-drive system which Triumph hopes will put it ahead of the best-selling BMW R1200GS and BMW R1200GS Adventure. If...

Reply to this Topic  
  • Posted 3 years ago (16 February 2012 12:18)

Post a message in TIGER 1200 EXPLORER

Fields marked with an asterisk * are required

   

Please note. You cannot submit more than 4000 characters as a message.

Upload image(s) from your computer (up to 3 images)

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

Terms of use

Use of our community areas and forums is subject to important terms of use. By joining our community and using the features you agree to be bound by these terms. See terms of use below. 

Cancel
upthepalace

Joined:

Nov 09

Posts: 5

upthepalace says:

I think it'll be much more reliable than the Beemer and that'll be reason enough to choose it over the GS.  I have 2 mates with GSs and nothing but trouble and also another mate with a 1200RT, problematic.  What would I like to ask Triumph specifically about the 1200....will it come in the same crystal white as my 1050 Tiger?

Reply to this Topic
KiwiXTX

Joined:

Feb 12

Posts: 1

KiwiXTX says:

For the last 30 years I have owned a mixture of Japanese sports bikes and sports tourers, all of which were great for what I did – rideouts, longer trips, track days, commuting. Last December, knowing my youngest son would be away on a school trip for a month and there’d be no-one at home, I convinced my wife that we should do a bit of touring, Hilary not having been on a bike for 20 years. We ended up doing a 10 day trip around the South Island of New Zealand (we live in Auckland) on a hired Triumph Tiger 1050, my current bike, a Honda VTR1000, not having a great pillion. The trip went brilliantly; great weather, great NZ scenery, traffic free roads, plus a bike that performed flawlessly, was comfortable for both of us for 500km days, handled brilliantly even two-up with luggage, and pulled like a train. Since getting back I’ve sold the VTR, and test ridden the GS1200 and Super Tenere, both of which were disappointing in comparison to the Tiger. I’m now waiting to have a go on the Explorer which, if it is as good as the Tiger but with the extra power, torque and electronic wizardry, will be a great machine. Can’t wait.

Reply to this Topic
MudDoctor

Joined:

Mar 10

Posts: 115

MudDoctor says:

For all you cynics out there,

it should be remembered that Triumph had the 500cc TR5T Adventurer on the market in 1972, a large capacity road/trail bike, so it's not as if BMW beat them to it, rather it's the other way round. In fact, Triumph, Honda, Yamaha and Suzuki all had large capacity trail bikes on the market long before BMW.

It should also be remembered that while all the others used a variety of engines, from singles to parallel twins to V twins, BMW were still entrenched with their boxer twin engine.

My first Big Trailie was a Honda Africa Twin, which I bought in 1992, followed by  a Tiger 900 in 1993. I had looked at the BMW R80GS around then, but it seemed to me to be too heavy and a bit agricultural, let alone too expensive.

While I've had my share of sports bikes too, (1982 Laverda Jota 120 was my favourite), I guess that I got the most out of the Big Trailie bikes, especially for touring. Perhaps I'm one of the few riders that would have bought a BMW R1200GSA despite Ewan and Charley, and I did. I also bought a Tiger 800XC last year, and I still believe that in real world biking these types of bikes make the best all rounders.

Anyway, you can't accuse Triumph of copying BMW, with perhaps the exception of shaft drive, but then BMW don't have a monopoly on that either. The Triumph is also far better looking, and uses a modern engine layout that I'm sure will be very tractable and easy to handle.

Sure, I'll wait for a test ride before I pass final judgement, but I reckon that it will be a fine bike, amd more than capable of dealing with our awful roads, and way better than any crotch rocket.

That being said, until Triumph make the Advetnturer lighter and with a bigger fuel tank, and with electronically adjustable suspension, the R200GS still wins it for me. I  have had no reliability issues with mine over three years either.

Reply to this Topic
loftyjohn

Joined:

Jun 07

Posts: 15

loftyjohn says:

Please Mr Triumph can you fit the 1200 engine with shaft into my 800XC, Ditch all the fancy electronics and ABS and keep the weight the same for under £9999 ?

Now that would sell!

I would ask Mr Ducati the same question: can you fit the 848 engine with no bullsh*t electonics and ABS or fancy suspension into the Mulistrada for £9999 ?

That would also sell!

Reply to this Topic
Hedgehog5

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 2319

Hedgehog5 says:

MudDoctor...

BMW started the GS range of bikes in 1980 which became an extremely popular formula & turned them into market leaders in that field... but I'm pretty sure all of the manufacturers had what you'd call large capacity offroad bikes including BMW if only for their WWII efforts. Everybody is copying the GS because, out of all of the manufacturer's, they're the only one to truly make it popular, when all the others were concentrating on race & road bikes. They're playing catch-up in a market where BMW dominate... the competition should be a good thing.

Reply to this Topic
SatNavSteve

Joined:

Sep 10

Posts: 1270

SatNavSteve says:

Everyone is copying BMW? Why, who else makes a flat twin trail bike? BMW started making trail bikes with an existing engine, probably to save money but to go one step further with off road bikes, you go to moto cross and who would or has set out to design a dirt track bike with that engine configuration? Lets be honest, it sticks out a bit doesn't it and banking over on the berms, the pots are going to dig in a bit. Its really the image and not the off road practicality that has won BMW sales

Reply to this Topic
MudDoctor

Joined:

Mar 10

Posts: 115

MudDoctor says:

Hedgehog5,

where do we begin? While I have no idea who was the first to put an engine into a bicycle, it could be argued that everyone else has copied that theme ever since. Since none of the other competitors in the Adventure class have bothered to use a horizontally opposed twin or used asymetric headlights, it's hard to see where the copying has been done, other than having two wheels.

That being said, I believe that Douglas Motorcycles used an opposed flat twin in 1912, long before BMW, so even that's not original, and neither is shaft drive.

Apart from asymetric headlights, can it not be said that BMW copied most, if not all Superbikes with the S1000RR?

No manufacturer is ever going to ignore a market segment that is growing, and unless they are infringing patent or copyright laws, to call them "copycat" is just wrong.

As an owner of just such a BMW, it's great to see that other manufacturers are joining in, if only to give BMW a wee kick up the arse to develop their bike a little faster. I agree, it's the market leader, but probably due to not only being very good at what it does, but also because it had the field to itself for so long.

Let's not forget that Triumph have responded to the market, and the market said that it wanted shaft drive. Yamaha had already responded similarly, but I have yet to see more than a handful of Super Tenere's on the road. Too expensive.

The market also said that it wanted more power, hence a 1200 triple.

Long haul bike, then cruise control seems apt. BMW have yet to offer that on the GS, but we'll see what comes with the water cooled GS next year.

I suspect that the Tiger Explorer will do very well, winning some converts from BMW, some new to the segment, and those that want the GS but are fed up with the frankly childish Carley and Ewan name calling. Also those that have Tiger 800's but want a bigger version and shaft drive.

Reply to this Topic
stevecase

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 129

stevecase says:

At the end of the day Triumph want a piece of the action, I bough my GS11 to commute and did 40K miles on it in 2 years, I washed it every year if it needed it or not, crashed it once or twice and did all manner of bad repairs etc.

In return it kept running and averaged 45mpg, took me to Assen and Scotland and served as my only transport for 4 years. Its also pretty ugly and has a huge carbuncle of a 24 ltr tank. But it serves a purpose and when I bought it in Dec 2000 it was one of the few bikes available that could. Would I buy another GS....YES, would I buy the Adventure...no idea lets see if its any good first.

Reply to this Topic
stevecase

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 129

stevecase says:

Oh and forgot to say

The one thing I hate about the GS11 is its a fat B***TARD, unbelieveably heavy! and if I was going to look at a Triumph I'd look at the 800 not this 250Kg pork monster!

Reply to this Topic
stevecase

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 129

stevecase says:

Meant Explorer by the way not Adventure

Reply to this Topic

Page

Compare Insurance

Save money by comparing quotes. It's quick and easy

Motorcycles for sale

 

It's only £13.99 to advertise your motorcycle on MCN

Sell your Motorcycle

Motorcycle pricing tool

New! Find used bike prices