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Anonymous

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Matthew Birt  says:

Casey Stoner: Tight tracks frustrating on new 1000s

Reigning MotoGP world champion Casey Stoner says the extra horsepower on his new 1000cc Honda RC213V machine makes riding short and tight tracks like Jerez a frustrating experience. Many people anticipate the new 1000s to be capable of hitting top speeds of more than 220mph at fast tracks like Qatar, Catalunya and Mugello. But after spending three days riding at the tight...

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  • Posted 3 years ago (27 March 2012 17:37)

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williewheelbreaker

Joined:

Jul 08

Posts: 917

and for DiscoBiskit.....

Now you have had time to calm down, slowly read my posts again, think about each sentence carefully. Reread your post, take out all the parts which I neither stated nor inferred, and come back to me so we can discuss. 


Further to parts of your post (for which I have the time to respond tonight) was it not KR Snr not Jr who rode an M1 at Laguna last year and commented how powerful the bikes were? Watch this and see what they really think of our modern pampered prima donnas.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQMjeC0kItU   Very funny, 25 points to Yamaha. 

Your comment about Lorenzo's crash proves my point even better..... he was brutally fired off his M1 because he gave it a big handful safe (or so he thought) in the knowledge the little black box would hobble his beast and also thereby proves the fastest guys have learned to trust the gizmos implicitly. 

I can post you another vid with Spies being interviewed by Eddie Lawson where "Elbowz" tells Eddie he would love to have a ride on a 500 stroker with no intention of setting a meaningful lap, but just to see how scary they were to ride. He also states how he has the utmost respect for the guys who rode with no electronic aids. Eddie argues back and forth that compared to what he is used to now that he would just hate it and want to get back to what he knows. Not in an arrogant or derogatory sense but just that he would think it was horrible and would want to park it. 

The riders of today are FAR from "pussies" (your words NOT mine) and ride incredibly fast and precise, which is exactly why when the lights go out everyone quickly hits a lap time "level" and the electronics allow them to just stay virtually static at that "level" for the whole race if they are good enough. Like I have said before, especially referring to practice times, Moto GP times in the 800/1000 era are the closest in GP history. Humans cannot split the hairs but super high speed silicone can. Now theres a good dog... have you reread my posts yet? Ciao Mama!!!    

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Nostrodamus

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Mar 09

Posts: 4508

Nostrodamus says:

Easier / harder or just different Willie?

As Fred Gassit said many years ago Willie 'Motorcycles are inherently unstable devices, you need to go fast to stay upright officer'. Yes the riders of today have learnt to trust the electronics implicitly, but that's not to say that ham fistedness can't overcome them and send a rider to the moon. I think Abrahams probably crashed in just about every manner possible 2011.  All the old principals of weighting a machine correctly and smooth transitions off brakes and onto power still exist for the reasons Gassit stated. 

I think you devalue just what these modern pilots are doing on a machine Willie. Read what Crutchlow says about Lorenzo getting on and off the brakes 10 metres earlier than others. Or every rider in the paddock scratching their head about the seemingly counter intuitive manner in which Stoner controls a motorcycle.Yes technology has helped to sharpen the edge but the riders have developed too and their skills are still there in plentiful supply. The definining factor remains the man and not the machine like those silly car things.

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jollyboy

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Sep 11

Posts: 402

jollyboy says:

Benny, fuel stops are one of the things that makes F1 so boring. We certainly don't want to see them in motorcycle racing.

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jollyboy

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 402

jollyboy says:

Benny the problem with longer races and fuel stops is that the tactics aren't visible or interesting unless you're some sort of geek. When teams are relying more on their fuel and tyre strategy than they are on their rider's race craft it make make the sport more cerebral, but it sure as hell makes it less interesting to watch. Chess is cerebral, but you wouldn't catch me watching it. And of course it makes it easier for the teams to enforce team orders. MotoGP is becoming increasingly dull because it is less of a gladiatorial contest than it once was. Already I'm concerned that the sport will never again get the sort of kick in the pants that Garry McCoy delivered at Welkom in 2000. Intoducing longer races and pit stops would only compound that.

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jollyboy

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Sep 11

Posts: 402

jollyboy says:

The sidecar thing is certainly interesting and it's a sport I've always enjoyed watching. I even gave the chair a try once, but didn't trust the driver (I can't think of them as riders) enough. However I don't know how much interest today's spectators will show. Many will tell you that spectator interest wained because the machines didn't really resemble road going sidecar outfits anymore. I would say that the reason interest wained was that few people rode sidecars anymore so people didn't really "relate" to sidecar racing. Or maybe it was a bit of both. I certainly think MotoGP needs refreshing, but whatever changes are made need to be carefully thought out so they can last for a number of years.

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galaway

Joined:

Dec 08

Posts: 63

galaway says:

tight tracks

what a great idea  to have sidecars racing at the gp meetings

cut down on the bull and interviews

give us value for money  tickets arnt cheap

at least we would see bikes racong

its going a bit like formula one

soon only be 1 race  to watch and loads o bull

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