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krispy1

Joined:

Apr 12

Posts: 4

krispy1 says:

bikes

My wife has finally agreed to let me have a bike 

 and any advice on a first bike for learning on would be helpful (i'm 39) :biggrin:

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  • Posted 3 years ago (18 April 2012 06:25)

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MarcusMarsh

Joined:

Aug 09

Posts: 2721

MarcusMarsh says:

First bike

Speak to your local training schoool and discuss the options with them first.  As I understand the current rules you can either be let loose on a 125 with just CBT or you can take a Direct Access test on a 500 which gives you an unrestricted license.

Once you have decided which way to go you can then look at the options in respect of bikes.  (Knowing your budget would help too)     

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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philwill65

Joined:

Mar 11

Posts: 9

philwill65 says:

don't

don't buy a 125. I was about 41 when I took my CBT and as soon as I had that I put in for my big bike test. A couple of days riding with the riding school and I took my test. Passed it and was then able to buy my first big bike. A Suzuki Bandit. It was then and only then that I rode every day I could and it was that, that gave me the experience that has stood me in good stead. In my opinion, buying a 125 at your age (I'm assuming you have road experience so are not totally wet behind the ears) is not necessary.

I had no experience whatsoever of  riding a motorbike with gears before I did my test. My only knowledge of riding was on a twist and go in my twentys for commuting.
I ride almost every day of the year now and every single day is a learning experience. There are hazards and dangers on every journey but be aware of them and you will be a better rider for it.
Good luck.

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krispy1

Joined:

Apr 12

Posts: 4

krispy1 says:

bikes

:unsure:Thanks for the reply's and yes I am a complete novice.

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Tricky without knowing

your budget.

My personal advice is get a cheap 125 to start on (on a CBT, you'll have to display L-plates) for a few months. Bear in mind as a newbie, insurance will be a significant bite. Something like a Honda CG125 or Yamaha YBR125 are ideal runabouts, will run forever and a day, have plenty spares / service availability, and will survive a drop fairly well (everyone drops bikes at some point).

You'll need decent kit (helmet / gloves / boots etc), and that doesn't always come cheap either (its the one thing you hope to never need). If you're riding in winter, it needs to be warm as well (nothing will sap your concentration like being cold). I wouldn't buy a *very* cheap helmet (it might not stand up that well in a spill). Winter is often a good time to buy (last seasons gear can sometimes be had with a good discount if you look). A good helmet should fit well (not so tight that its distracting, and not too loose - if its loose, it may move {or come off entirely} and not do its job properly).

The other bit you'll need is security, because you don't want a retired-at-16 chav disappearing with your bike. Chaining the bike to a solid object / ground anchor is probably best, and if its outside, covering it up can be a good idea (it'll deter most opportunists if they have to make an effort), though if someone REALLY wants your bike (ie a determined, professional thief) they'll have it; they'll be tooled up and have it planned.

Hope that helps.

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krispy1

Joined:

Apr 12

Posts: 4

krispy1 says:

bikes

thanks chaps. I was thinking of getting a 125 first and getting used to the gears / road etc .Not sure of my budget as I dont know what is reasonable for a first bike (in decent nic)

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

I wouldn't put

too much money on a first bike: firstly, you'll likely want to trade up as you gain experience / pass your test, and you almost always lose money when you trade up, although if you get a semi-sensible, few-years-old 125, the biggest depreciation period is over, so you can buy it relatively cheaply and sell it on for almost the same price as you paid for it. It'll also be more insurable (lower value, thus less for the insurer to pay out), and it'll help you gain some no-claims bonus if / when you feel ready to trade up.
 
Also (repeating my other post), the chances of dropping it are high; the more expensive / newer the bike, the more gutted you'll be when you do.

A couple of youngish CG125s on fleabay:
CG 125 1

CG 125 2

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krispy1

Joined:

Apr 12

Posts: 4

krispy1 says:

bikes

thanks for all your help and advice, hope to be on the road soon.

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