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Anonymous

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Matthew Birt  says:

Casey Stoner urges rules stability in MotoGP

Reigning world champion Casey Stoner has urged MotoGP bosses to stop meddling with rules and regulations to have a period of stability to help the premier class prosper in the future.The Australian believes a lack of stability with technical rules in recent years has been the downfall of the series and contributed to small grid numbers and the huge expense...

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  • Posted 3 years ago (18 April 2012 12:37)

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ow01fogno1

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Apr 11

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ow01fogno1 says:

the man has learned

hater or not, stoners point is on the money, right on , dorna should seriously listen to him, he listened to rossi for years so now maybe stoner and jorge are the future of keeping the series no1. ahem because world supers atm is a btter class in my veiw.

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Zoggthefantastic

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Hard to balance

Rule changes make life expensive. No rule changes creates stagnation. F1 marched on for years until the technological advances were making racing impossible and it became very boring. Then went through a period of rule changes in search of bringing the magic back. Now there is more passing but it is very synthetic. Tyres designed to go off very quickly and zones where the aerodynamics are manipulated by race control. I don't think anyone wants that sort of crap in bike racing. I agree with Stoner the constant changes aren't great, but if you haven't hit the right formula is it a good idea to stick with it just because. Maybe better to keep evolving until you get where you want to go.

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YamahaGYTR

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YamahaGYTR says:

World Supers better class I agree but the one disappointment is no Yamaha on the grid.

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CosherB

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CosherB says:

so a geriatric spaniard on an obsolete Ducati leading the championship makes World Superbikes better?

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YamahaGYTR

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YamahaGYTR says:

No not that troll the fact there are more bikes on the grid only that Yamaha aren't lining up on the grid as they withdraw from the series last year.

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jollyboy

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jollyboy says:

YamahaGYTR

I don't think the number of bikes on the grid is important, it's the racing that matters. Nobody could deny that the racing back in the Sheene/Roberts era was thrilling, yet sometimes the grid was struggling to get into double figures. Even so the fact remains that if Dorna really want to keep costs down (and I'm not convinced they do) then the one thing that will keep the costs down is not forcing teams to keep having to change things to suit new rules. The revisionist history written by Dorna claims that one of the aims of changing to 990cc ten years ago was to reduce costs. Really? How did having to develop a complete new motorcycle reduce costs? Dorna themselves stated that the 500cc two strokes had virtually reached a plateau of development, so what better way would there have been to keep costs down than to stick with the 500s. For years Dorna have gone on and on about reducing costs, but in fact they don't seem to have the first clue how to do it.

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YamahaGYTR

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YamahaGYTR says:

Dorna have always been in agreement with Honda when it comes to MotoGP rules since Honda are a big company they have a part to play in the future of MotoGP 990 to 800 biggest mistake IMO even some of the riders say that the future of racing is four stroke.

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CosherB

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CosherB says:

jollyboy - i think you're doing Dorna a disservice as they've clearly demonstarted that Moto2 is a formula of racing of it's time - and a massive success as well.  although it's very early days, Moto3 is looking very promising as well. I'm sure that as the good days of financial stability and (relative) wealth return, Moto2 will become an open-manufacturer 500cc twin cylinder class - it makes sense with the way the engine regs have gone for MotoGP and Moto3.  but for the time being, why change it if it ain't broke?

hindsight is a wonderful thing, but i've never heard of any criticism of the 990cc four stroke formula with the kind of racing it introduced.  i do think, however, that the racing dished up between '04-'06 has made us look back with rose-tinted glasses - Rossi's domination on the RCV wasn't accompanied by exciting racing.  and again, with hindsight, going to 800s was a mistake.  i'd like to think though that everyone has learned from that by the way the new 1000cc regs have been produced, with scope for future tinkering.

as i posted previously on this thread, Dorna is struggling to crack the 'Moto1' problem.  in theory, the current tack will work, however uncomfortable it is having two classes of bike on the same grid.  maybe we'll have to live with CRT for a few years until something can be agreed for the longer term.  or maybe Carmelo really will take on the factories and give us a proper 'Moto1' class ....

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Zoggthefantastic

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Cheers benny

Funnily enough, i watched the f1 for the first time in ages. As if to underline what I said, Schumacher was complaining about the tyres being ridiculous, feeling like he had to drive like he was stuck behind a safety car to manage tyres.

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jollyboy

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jollyboy says:

I think that "living with CRT" isn't the problem per se. Indeed CRT isn't actually a bad idea, it does give us the basis to build an infrastructure like that found in four wheeled sport since, well, forever. Not only are many F1 teams small specialist concerns, but that runs through single seat and "sports car" racing, it also works in other forms of 4 wheeled sport. There are plenty of factory teams which are actually run by small specialist companies with very little input from the factories other than financial. I've said before that CRT will not work over night and that Dorna are not giving it chance to work. To build up the proper infrastructure will take years, but Dorna seem to be getting cold feet already. Could this have something to do with pressure from the factories? The claiming rule is only there to keep the factories happy in the first place. Given the budget somebody could build an engine within CRT rules to challenge the full prototype engines so a claiming rule was introduced to prevent it. What needs to happen if Dorna really want to end up with an F1 style infrastructure is for the rules for prototypes and CRT bikes to slowly (and I MEAN slowly) converge. Which would of course mean more restrictions on engines and testing for CRT bikes, along with an increase in the claiming price. That should, in the long term, give us teams who can compete with the factories, but it would take years and it would need Dorna to be able to stand up to Honda, Yamaha and Ducati. Will it happen? Dorna's current and recent record on proposed rule changes does not fill me with hope. Some have claimed that such an infrastructure would be bad for the sport, but I do not agree. Some seem to be worried that such an infrastructure could encourage car manufacturers to start making engines for the sport. Really? Like Honda and BMW aren't car manufacturers. I don't give a damn who makes the engines or chassis as long as the sport is exciting. Now you might think this clashes with what I was saying about not caring if a single manufacturer dominates just so long as the racing is close. It doesn't. You see to me Yamaha or Honda could dominate, or it could be say Suter or FTR or whoever with a Renault engine.

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