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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

Need all the advice I can get

I am trying to find out everything I can before I move up a grade. I current have a 125cc but am selling soon after I have take my test.


First question is what CC would you recommend moving up to? Ideally would like a 600 but I can always dream. Insurance companies wouldn't like that.

I am 19 about 5 10" so not tall enough for a high riding position. I like the look of both naked (cbf etc) and sports bikes but not a supersport with the aggressive riding position.

I will have training off a grade 1 police advanced instructor for free so I am going to get as many hours as he is nice enough to offer. Hopefully I will be able to grasp every aspect of the road (forward perception, riding postion etc) and then pass my test!

I tend to ramble on, basically I would just like advice on which CC to move up to and what bikes you may consider worth looking at. I would also like to ask what things I should be doing in order to pass my restricted test. I always look in my mirrors, maybe excessively. 

I asked this question on another thread and one guy was nice enough to answer (forgot his name but gave extensive information) but I think moving to a 600 would be stupid. I just considered it due to not having much money therefore cannot be moving from 125-250-400-600-1000 for example. 

Thanks in advance! 

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  • Posted 3 years ago (04 May 2012 19:33)

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bbstrikesagain

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 878

A few years older than you

I went from a 125 to a 550.  I'd done 9000 miles on that 125 and been passed a long time previous.  For me the upgrade to double the weight and four times the power went absolutely fine, but if you test on your 125 you'll be looking at a 33bhp restriction, in which case I'd recommend CBF500 for a sensible bike that handles tidily and restricts to 33bhp flawlessly.

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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

Thanks

I saw a pretty nice cbf 600 outside my house the other day I had a look at it, it seemed to be quite small but I bet it still has the power. 


Would a CBF500 be much different? I think i'd prefer it due to my height. 

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gjkt

Joined:

Jul 09

Posts: 440

gjkt says:

CBF600

Wife bought one after her test. Came with restrictor kit fitted & lowered seat. She's quite short but finds it easy to ride. This years insurance was £77 fully comp. Seat has 3 position adjustment anyway & almost 80 bhp when derestricted. A wolf in sheeps clothing as it's based on the Hornet.

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Depends on your budget

but have you looked at the Kawasaki ER5 / ER6? Insurable, restrict-able (on grounds of your age), cheap and should be comfortable for your height. Twins tend to restrict better than four-cylinder machines.

Jumping to a 600 / 650 from a 125 in itself isn't a problem, (although obviously you need to treat it with respect) - problems all-to-frequently occur when people try to jump straight to the uber-powerful, extreme weaponry (ie, the "I've just passed my test, should I buy a Daytona 675 / ZX6R / CBR600RR / R6, or should I just go straight to a Fireblade in case I get bored with a highly-strung 600?" if you get me.

Have a look / sit on the ER5 / 6, or indeed a CB500 (another cheap, insurable starter bike), and see if you can get comfortable on it.

As for mirrors, I check mine frequently (some would say excessively, I check mine practically every 5 - 10 seconds) - provided you're not being distracted from whats happening up front, its fine. Being aware of whats happening around you is a key point of the test, and indeed, staying alive on the roads after the test.

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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

QIKT

Thanks! Been looking at the CBF, I have the cbf125 I like it but hate the 125cc I would just like to have the extra power there if I need it and be able to cruise at 60mph as I live in the middle of nowhere without it sounding like valves popping out. 


I tried to quote myself on a Gixxer and....ninja came back with 0 results. Will try for a cbf!

Hope your wife is enjoying it! 

That is pretty good for insurance too, but as i'm only 19 I have stupid quotes. I'm paying nearly £300 for a 125, at least it's better than when I got quoted £2500 for my Rover 400 1.4.

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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

AdieR

Thanks! You seem to know the answer to all my questions haha.


I will have a look at them! Just trying to look at all the bikes I can, before I make a decision to part exchange my one after my test. 

I really like naked bike style and sports bike. The instructor I know let me on his Hayabusa, so much fun yet so facking uncomfortable. As I will be using my bike for pretty much all my travel, aggressive riding position would just but stupid. 

When riding I would respect the power, I know that if I rip the throttle on a 125 it would probably flood the carbs and slowly pick up speed, if I do that on a 600 i'm hitting the ground backwards. 

Someone mentioned that a bike such as the CBF would have adjustable suspension I think? I have quite short legs and a long back which is pretty annoying. If bikes indeed do this it should make a few more bikes accessible. 

When I have the time I will go into a bike shop and see what postions are best for me.

Thanks again AdieR

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Other alternatives

to consider are the usual Hornets, Bandits and Fazers - though the insurance will probably be higher on these (ER6 is fairly easy to insure), although as 4-cylinder bikes, they'll probably feel more "strangled" by restriction. The SV650 is another competent and popular bike (but it'd be a good idea to check comfort and insurance first), and the (now) old-hat Kawasaki ZR7 may be worth a look too (although a 750, its got similar power to the Bandit 600) and should be cheap too.

I made a similar jump in size, and as silly as it may sound to some people, what I did to "acclimatise" myself to a 600 was to leave the machine on the stand and play about with the throttle - a 125 needs ragged to do anything, whereas a 500 / 600+ needs a precise throttle hand in comparison. Again, in this regard twins are probably easier (less sensitive to imprecise throttle control).

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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

AdieR

Will have to check them out!


What would you say insurance looks for? Cause you have put forward lots of suggestions and I will have to check up on a few but as i'm 19 I think insurance is still silly priced. Would CC affect insurance? or is it BHP. 

Had a look at your suggestions, I like the look of the ER6, CBF, CB and ZR. Would like to get hold of these bikes and see the comfort, size and noise. 

Thanks!

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Insurance

tends to vary from one company to another.  At your age, it's always going to be high until you have a few years experience / NCB under your belt.

Its not just CC / BHP / performance that affect it, but other factors like how attractive it is to thieves, parts pricing / availability (imported bikes tend to cost more to insure because some parts aren't easily sourced in your own country), modifications (esp performance-related ones) and the bikes value. They're trying to assess an overall risk level.

The insurance "groups" that are given in tests / spec lists can be used as a rough guide (a bike with insurance group 8 will be easier to insure than a group 12 bike). Some insurers are cheaper if you go 3rd party fire & theft, some will "encourage" you to go fully comp without costing much more. If you phone insurance firms (rather than relying on comparison sites on the net), that sometimes helps (you can explain what you do / don't need, rather than relying on the fixed choices on a site).

If it helps, I've used Aviva insurance for some years and generally found them to be quite competitive; maybe worth giving them a try.

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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

Thanks

I'll give Aviva a look and see what they're like, i'll try a few bikes and see what quotes I get. 


Best quote I got so far but only on 2 bikes was £1000. 

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