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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

Module 1 & 2

I've finally pinched enough coin to take my bike test for the restricted licence I think it's called. I'm 19 and just wanted to know what would come up. 


The company I am doing it with have a good reputation, even a guy I met in a chippy miles away recommended them as he just passed his test.

I took my CBT with them and they are good instructors, and very honest which for me is a good thing. 

I don't have much money as i'm a student and my parents have offered to pay for hour or two training.

Would I need any training for module 1? I've been riding a year on a CBF125 and will be taking the test on my own bike. 

Also would you recommend training for module 2? I am just trying to get as cheap as possible.

Thanks peoples!

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  • Posted 3 years ago (12 June 2012 14:35)

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

I'd get training

because:
a) the best of us can develop bad habits

b) saving money on training could well turn out more expensive in tests / re-tests

c) the training you receive, and the benefit from an instructors experience (both as an instructor, and as a biker himself) may well save your bacon one day (even if you don't realise it).

There's a lot of debate on this forum (and indeed others) about what kit to buy and wear; spending some of the money on training, instead of the latest kit, may (hopefully) mean that you don't rely on the kit to save your bacon (ie, prevention is better than cure).

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jon66

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 541

jon66 says:

dont skimp

on training , when all you have done is a CBT then went out on the road , you will never pass your test . you need to have lassons , go to the instructors you used for the CBT and they will advise you how much you require , good luck with your test :ph43r:

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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

Cheers =]

The instructor said he would do 2 hours of assessment/training for a day then he will tell me what to work on, and or if i'm ready to take my test.


Is module 1 that hard though? Cause it costs £15.50, yet if I were to take some training it will cost minimum of £45.50. 

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jon66

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 541

jon66 says:

mod 1

i felt it was not difficult  , but i did a half day practice before hand and when i went for any lessons i always had a wee practice before going out , i went from a year CBF125 to doing my full test , i still say go by what ur instructor says , and be prepared , i found MOD1 easy but on the day i sat it 2 experienced riders who had been banned failed because they were too cocky and hadnt done much practice .

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MrKarl

Joined:

Sep 11

Posts: 45

MrKarl says:

I see

I was thinking about putting 1 hour into module 1 and 2 hours into module 2. That is going to end up being £90. 


The instructor said I should do 3 hours, so what I am thinking is taking 1 hour for module 1 and 1 hour module 2 and if I need another hour I will do 2 hours then have to find some moolah for when I go for the proper thing. 

I do work for an ex-police officer who said he would give me training for free, but he did say to get assessed by a qualified instructor as police and normal instructors may look for different things. 

So all I can do is hope for the best! Think everything through and don't be cocky but confident in my skills.

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

A Police

instructor / examiner and an "ordinary" instructor / examiner will be looking for different things - for the DSA test, lifesavers are normally essential for every change of position, for advanced stuff the advice is often to *consider* a lifesaver depending on the situation at hand (an experienced rider can scan a particular traffic situation and pick up on small clues in a way that a new rider just can't do), plus an ordinary instructor will have a better idea of test routes and the key points where candidates become unstuck.

That said, if you're being offered instruction for free with your Police instructor take it, combining it with a DSA instructor should mean that you can lower the overall cost.

The other point I'd make is to use the instructor's / school's bike for the test - it'll give the impression to the examiner that you've been trained to a certain standard (rather than muddling through on your own), as the examiner will have had other candidates through them.

When all said and done, passing the test is the easy bit, staying alive on the roads for the next umpteen years is more difficult.

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