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Anonymous

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Matthew Birt  says:

Assen MotoGP: Valentino Rossi 13th after rear tyre disaster

Valentino Rossi went from challenging for his best dry weather result of 2012 to finishing in a disastrous 13th after he suffered a major rear tyre failure in Assen. Rossi was locked in a battle for fifth position with Nicky Hayden and Hector Barbera when his factory Ducati GP12 developed an early vibration from his hard compound Bridgestone rear tyre. The problem...

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  • Posted 3 years ago (01 July 2012 08:18)

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Bultoboy

Joined:

Apr 11

Posts: 3516

Bultoboy says:

Hugelean

I didn't say you said he wasn't trying. But you suggested he was taking it easy (relative term of course) by not hammering his tyres. My issue is what does hammering tyres mean. Lapping 3 or 4 tenths slower? They are still wringing the necks off them doing that, can such a small difference in lap time make any difference to a tyre? Knock 1 or 2 seconds a lap off and yes, I guess it will, but 3 or 4 tenths? You could see he was faster than Pedrosa yes, but they were both pushing hard.

As for Lorenzo's times, he never got below mid 1.34 all weekend and was never consistently faster than anyone else, so don't underatand your reference to his lap times. They were running in low / mid 1.34 in the race, dropping into 1.35 later on. How can you say what Lorenzo would have done?

In Silverstone race, there were 5 riders together for the first ? laps, all doing the same pace - Lorenzo lapped quicker than any of them for 4 laps to bridge the gap from his bad start. 3 of them suffered abnormal tyre wear not seen in practise, others didn't, whilst all were running the same pace. So charging off for the first few laps doesn't hold water as an argument over tyre wear.

The tyre manufacture appears to be inconsistent.

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motoking

Joined:

Jul 11

Posts: 968

motoking says:

STONER VS ROSSI

that's the difference skill between stoner and rossi. stoner so smart to save his tire during race, even lorenzo much smarter in previous race.

but rossi, look what he done???? from last year to this day, always has new excuses to blame.

ISN'T HE MOANING??? WHILE STONER COMPLAIN ABOUT THE TIRE YOU ALL SAID HE MOANING AND FIND EXCUSES. AND NOW ROSSI SAID THE SAME YOU DON'T CALL HIM MOANING???

you all 46ers ARE NUTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Hedgehog5

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 2322

Hedgehog5 says:

Bulto...

"They are still wringing the necks off them doing that, can such a small difference in lap time make any difference to a tyre? "

Lap in, lap out on tyres that are already at the limit, on the edge of going off, yes. We've seen it.

"Lorenzo lapped quicker than any of them for 4 laps to bridge the gap"

How many of those laps were as much as a 10th faster than the leader? 2?... so how many of those 1st 7 laps was he running slower than the leader... that'd be 3 then... so for 2 laps he was significantly faster than the leader (mostly Stoner). Lap 4 was his best at about half a second faster... but less than 3 tenths on Stoner... for 1 lap... for a bike/riding style that we know works well with the new tyres.

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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mike2265

Joined:

Apr 11

Posts: 137

mike2265 says:

parris

Did you read a different post to the one I wrote.  No where did I make any piss take judgements on you and you launch into a pile of ad hominems - and create a bunch of straw man arguments to respond to - not what I wrote.  Are you trying to wind me up?  I comment calm and balanced and for some reason you think that means I'm bitter and elitist when that's exactly what I'm arguing against?!  Are you in the dog house at the moment and looking for someone else to kick.

I didn't say BS were the best, but they're as good as many other top brands out there and how they perform in a motorbike race should have no impact on using them for general riding.  As I said - I don't currently use any.

I have friends that ride all sorts of bikes including sports bikes.  However most of them are on big chookies which are the most suitable for most roads - perhaps the roads you ride are nice smooth black top with predictable lines (even if we don't hit dirt the poor condition of the tar and the blind corners and forgiving nature of their geometry make them most suitable).  I don't have one at the mo but recognise their versatility.  Of course sports bikes are best for competition - that's what they're designed for.  Even amongst sports bikes the best for the track is usually not the best for the road.  As it turns out I currently do most of my riding on either a VFR750 or a firestorm (some dont' call it a sports bike but it's close).  The VTR can be thrown around easier but even with the VFR slower on the steering it handles bumpy roads better.  I don't think I'd be any faster on either of them than I would on big chookies I've had in the past.  Some of the real tight 1.5 lane lumpy bitumen near where I live was best handled by a DR650 I had - though a motard would have been better. 

When I observe all the people I ride with I don't see the bike as the biggest factor in the speed they ride and where there is an impact it's more than likely going to be them speeding up when moving to a tourer/big chookie becase they feel more comfortable on it and then their acceptable level of risk is effectively raised.

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Aajkz

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 24

Aajkz says:

Motoking

Are you serious? Have you seen the state of the tyre that came off? No. Didn't think so. Here's a link. http://i655.photobucket.com/albums/uu274/rac3r786/RossiTyre.jpg

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Smackbum

Joined:

Jun 11

Posts: 238

Smackbum says:

I will ask one more time

Does anyone here still think Bridgestone are supplying a quality product that enhances rider safety?

No one??  Good.

So on behalf of us ALL I would like to extend Casey Stoner a hugenormous apology for all the biased and boneheaded criticism that some vacuous MCN contributers have posted in the past few weeks.  I would like to assure Casey, Nicky, Ben and even Valentino that we ALL sympathise with their recent experiences of sub-standard rubber, which has cost them points and potential podiums.

Manufacturing tyres that suit only one competitor (or more exactly - one style of competitor) was something that BS were supposed to have solved.  Instead they have merely switched camps, and in a nod to cost-cutting they have also sacked all their quality control people (I presume).

Epic fail ... but at least they are finally owning up to this fact.

 

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Nostrodamus

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 5416

Nostrodamus says:

Last time I checked Benny

Riders were still chucking themselves down the road for the same reasons they always have - pushing the boundaries of traction available in any given situation. How many times did Stoner crash 2011? A decent high side, a couple of wobble offs and of course the unguided red missile. Can't be more than a handful.

The shrill 'rash' of Friday morning highsides last year was down to one thing alone - rider error.

In ten days time we come to 340,350, 360 or in MM hyperbole parlance 370kmph Mugello. On the back of chunking tyres at Assen. Bridgestone has made, wrapped and delivered this rubber already. No 11th hour Rossi rescue miracle tyres available in this one supplier world. Spies is nervous, you can bet the rest of them are too. we've all seen what happened to Shinya Nakano on the Mugello straight a few years ago.

Tyres are safe when they are predictable. Last years rubber was. This new Dorna spec is proving far from.

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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motoking

Joined:

Jul 11

Posts: 968

motoking says:

stoner so great

he already complain about the tire long before this happen.

 

aajk, that's why i said in another forum that's the different between your rider and stoner. stoner much great and smarter. sorry that's my opinion. but it proven from last year.

 

ben push so much from the beginning of the race. watch it again. the tire this year run out so quickly.

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Smackbum

Joined:

Jun 11

Posts: 238

Smackbum says:

Careful BHH

Do you really think Valentino and Ben were racing on safe tyres?  Truly - you are that delusional??

At least Rossi had the good sense to make a mid-race pit-stop for new rubber, even though it wrecked his best dry race of the season.  Spies on the other hand was in a podium position and pushed to the very last to defend it from Dovi.  Unfortunately in the end he had to relinquish the spoils of war to the guy who wants his seat, but better that than a life-threatening crash which was a real possibility.

These tyres are shit and if any rider is injured because of construction flaws then Bridgestone will find themselves being sued into bankruptcy.

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