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Iain1993

Joined:

Jul 12

Posts: 3

Iain1993 says:

Buying a Honda CG125

Hi all,

I'm planning on getting a bike to do CBT and A2 test on and ride for a year or two while I'm still at uni. I've gathered that the Honda CG125 is a good bet but I've never bought a bike before so don't really know what to look for, how long do bikes last? for instance is it even worth buying a 12 year old bike that's done 38000. 

Would much appreciate any suggestions and/or advice, my budget for the bike is fairly low (around £600) and would be happy with anything that'll run reliably over a two year period, thanks

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  • Posted 2 years ago (29 July 2012 22:31)

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3071

AdieR says:

The CG

is generally a good bet: cheap to buy, run and insure, uses hardly any fuel, easy to fix with loads of spares available.

As for how long they last, its heavily dependent on how its been treated and maintained more than age or miles.

Some scrapes and minor marks are likely - newbies tend to drop bikes (and likely you will too) and that isn't necessarily too much of a problem. Heavy scrapes / dents or bent forks / bars indicate crash damage which may well be.

If you can stretch your budget to it, try and get one from 2004-on; these have better gearboxes than earlier ones.
If its your first time buying a bike, then try and get a clued up mate with you.

Mechanically, they're pretty straightforward bikes, but for all that, try and establish its service history (if there's no book, then a list of receipts or bills for parts/service) - this will give an idea of how the bike has been treated (try to build a picture of the bike using the receipts and the bikes overall condition).

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Iain1993

Joined:

Jul 12

Posts: 3

Iain1993 says:

Cheers for the reply,

I've just seen the one for £400 in the for sale section, 2001, 41,000 miles, just a fault with the electric starter which I'm pretty confident I can fix/get fixed (new battery?) I'm going to phone tomorrow to ask about service history, but is there anything else in particular that goes wrong with these to check for? Look like a good bet or save up a bit more?

Unfortunately literally no-one I know owns a bike but a friend and I are joining the fray together.

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3071

AdieR says:

It may be

the battery - it may also be the starter motor, its solenoid or the button bearing in mind its an 11-year-old bike (although either way CG parts aren't generally difficult to find or expensive; they were in production for 30-odd years).

I had one temporarily when I did my test and never had any problems with it. Don't know of any common faults with it.

This might prove useful to you.

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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Iain1993

Joined:

Jul 12

Posts: 3

Iain1993 says:

cheers,

had a good read over that yesterday, I'm only 19 and just have a bit of experience with bicycles, but if I need any help I think the internet/manual/dad will be enough to get the repairs done.


Is there any way of transporting bikes as I haven't done my CBT yet, I could possibly fit in the back of my dad's Toyota Picnic, any experience with bikes in cars? Otherwise I may have to give this one a miss until I'm fully legal

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3071

AdieR says:

How far are

you from the bike?

My first thought is either hire a van, or see if you can beg / borrow / rent a bike trailer (you'll need a ramp or a lift to get it in / on)- the bike will need strapping down either way.

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ricklincs45

Joined:

Aug 05

Posts: 9

ricklincs45 says:

CG 125

Iain, you've probably got a CG by now (only just seen your thread), so the following may be of use.


The one thing that's fairly critical on these engines is the quantity and quality of the oil.  The CG engine is a very sound and reliable unit but it doesn't hold a lot of oil.  It's therefore ESSENTIAL that you check the level regularly (the level should always be at the upper end of the dipstick marker - don't be tempted to run the bike with a low oil level).

It's also important that you change the oil regularly (dead simple job) and use proper motorbike oil - don't be tempted to use cheaper car oil - it's not able to withstand the shearing forces of a motorbike gearbox).  Personally, I always changed the oil on my Honda 125 singles every 500 miles.  Also worth having the centrifugal filter that lives behind the clutch cover cleaned once a year.

A couple of other things to keep an eye on; centre stands rust and are prone to the legs buckling/snapping and keep the drive chain properly lubed and adjusted.  With the chain being hidden by the full enclosure, it can get forgotten.

All the best,

Rick @ 80bikes.com


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scott111193

Joined:

May 12

Posts: 27

scott111193 says:

The cg is a great bike

The CG125 got me through my bike test, I can't say enough good things about it to be honest, I own a Pulse adrenaline 125, but the cg is much easier to ride, specially at low speed, great for module 1 and module 2. 


A brilliant investment! 

Scott 

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