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admin

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 1113

admin says:

Poll: What's stopping you doing advanced training?

Next week's MCN features ex-World Superbike Champion Neil Hodgson being assessed on a Bikesafe training course. It's the first advanced training Neil had ever done, and he came away impressed, having learned a few things to improve his road riding. So why don't more of us do advanced training? Don't forget to comment below  

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  • Posted 3 years ago (22 August 2012 15:45)

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GrahamMarsden

Joined:

Jun 12

Posts: 14

I could spend an hour writing a post ripping some of the nonsense posted already on here to shreds, but I can't be bothered, so let's try this:

I passed my Direct Access five years ago. After three years of riding I decided that a) I knew I could ride better but b) I didn't know *how*, so I signed up with Solent Advanced Motorcyclists.

Since then I've passed my Advanced Test and got my Green Badge, however I've not bought a BMW, nor a pipe and slippers. What I *have* done is learned much more about how to position the bike, how to judge the speed of entry into a corner, how to extend my observation to as far as I can see and many other useful techniques which have improved my riding beyond recognition.

I don't give a toss whether people do IAM, Bikesafe, RoSPA or whatever, but if you think you know it all even if (or especially if!) you've been riding for X many years and never had an accident, then you're either a) a Riding God or b) deluding yourself with a false sense of your own abilities.

Go to somewhere that gives Advanced Training, they will probably give you a free (or cheap) introductory opinion of your skills according to what they consider to be good practice. Maybe you won't agree, maybe you are actually a Riding God or maybe, just maybe, you'll actually pick up a useful bit of information that you'd not thought about in the past.

Do you *really* have anything to lose by doing this? Or are you actually just afraid of criticism and scared that you might not be as good as you thought?

 

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hairyMuppet

Joined:

Dec 03

Posts: 317

hairyMuppet says:

@GrahamMarsden

So....just because it has "Advanced" in the name, it should be accepted completely without question or critique?  I have taken advanced training and as I stated I found the group seriously wanting and generally suffering from your item "b)".

I'm all for advanced training, but the students should keep their brain in gear and not simply accept what they feel is incorrect without some dicussion (and I do not mean stubbornly refuse to change their way because "they know best" or are "a riding god").  And if the situation does not improve, the student should be prepared to leave (possibly demanding a refund).

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Ridefree

Joined:

Jun 08

Posts: 137

Ridefree says:

I voted 'other' because after 2 different Bkesafe and training courses I had 2 different types of instructor.

No1 Volunteer instructor - brilliant guy, corrected and much improved me, when I was older than him and he did it without patronising or humiliating me. Very positive guy and learnt loads.

No.2 Paid instructor, who covered the topics already learnt which was OK as I wanted a refresher. Couldn''t get his points over I was right turn critiscised for getting on the bike after starting it (OK I was brought up on kick start bikes and bikes that wouldn't start). Slowing down when tuning off a dual carriageway when I didn't, the car overtaking had speeded up which made it look that I had slowed down, yet I was obviousley a liar when explaining this. Too short use of horn when warning a lorry that was reversing off the road, should have been a minimum 30s blast, although I have a powerfull horn and the driver had seen me. Don't think I did anything else wrong. Very negative guy and learnt nothing.

I don't really care if I get on with the instructor or not, as long as I learn something. Won't be going back to No.2

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rcraven

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 122

rcraven says:

I think its becoming an IAM bashing exercise and i dont think thats what its all about. Its about training and motorcycle safety, whether its called  advanced or defensive or whatever.  To my mind  all the various technques for safer riding should be made more readily available and with suitably qualified instructors/examiners/ assesors who are at least  all singing from the same page in the same  hymnbook and where  all the variences are ironed out. Where personal interpretations or preferences do not apply.

 As regards to the IAM it appears that  there are problems out there that have been highlighted by this mag.which i feel those in any authority within the IAM should take seriously and  look at the comments closely  and consider were its going wrong and more importantly how it can be corrected.

The problem seems to be one of attitude and thats the attitude of the instructor plus[ and  more importantly] his or her ability to put forward a valid point to one under supervision [ its not instruction as such its advice]  Generally a person wishing to undergo such training has shown the right attitude by wishing to be a safer rider.

Arrogance seems to be a stumbling block and i have come across this barrier with several assessors. to the point of argument in public where one of the assessosr became very  agitated and aggressive toward me  because i stuck to my beliefs.. I was concerened that he may suffer a stroke!!!!  The  same sometimes applies to some police officers who will not listen to positive arguement .

 

However there are now a handfull of  DSA fully qualified  instructors out there who have undergone a very comprehensive course of for their  qualifications and hopefully they  will be more professional than the voluntary sector.

 

PS hairyMuppet if ever u are up in the north west and want a ride out i would be please to show u some lovely country roads. I can be found on the RidesafeBacksafe website.

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tman39a

Joined:

Mar 08

Posts: 130

tman39a says:

Advanced!!

Its all relative as to what is advanced for each rider...after 3 local Police run Bikesafe runs I received the same basic reports. They weren't concerned about speed beyond showing you how to properly control it whilst maintaining bike stability and showing me how to look much further ahead as speed increased...its all 99% common sense but not something that you naturally think about. My view is that if you weren't trained to read the road to get the best line and speed for the conditions in the first place then advanced training is essential...but it takes it to be from the right people and only the emergency bikers are up to that task. I learnt more about spirited riding on certain roads types in 1hr on a Bikesafe assessment than in 20+ yrs of trackdays..tracks don't give a real perception of speed and are built for speed with generally clear visibility and run off areas....roads aren't so get all the training you can and learn from it. Fundamentally its upto each rider to determine if they think they need training but bottom line is no-one knows everything so why not learn more if it increases your chance of avoiding being a road statistic.

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wings1372

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 359

wings1372 says:

I just don't fancy having to ride with a plank of wood down my back, and always ride wearing a flip-up lid and cordura 2 piece.

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billysollocks

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 515

If, perhaps, it was sold as "enhanced training" or " rider improvement", it would be better received. I'm as guilty as the next person of falling into bad habits, so the chance to have my riding looked at and suggestions made as to how to improve by someone who is at the top of their game  would help. I do know that such "improvement" is looked at as being a bit anoraky or geeky in some circles, not helped by some advanced riders / drivers who do tend to impart their opinions in a rather nasally whine. Then again, the self preservation instinct works quite well for me in most instances.

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venturer

Joined:

Jan 04

Posts: 150

venturer says:

4 newer riders id say yes

if your an older rider, who spend more time off road pushing crap motorbike trying to start them, before making the transition to running crap off road bikes, then spending years riding off road, then moving onto road bike and then getting bigger and faster road bikes then extra training might not be that helpful. But when I see a story in the papers about another crash of someone on a small capacity bike I think, could something or additional training have prevented it. so I think additional training should be provided free of charge from some central government body, paid for by the euro government people that have all our money.

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venturer

Joined:

Jan 04

Posts: 150

venturer says:

4 newer riders id say yes

if your an older rider, who spend more time off road pushing crap motorbike trying to start them, before making the transition to running crap off road bikes, then spending years riding off road, then moving onto road bike and then getting bigger and faster road bikes then extra training might not be that helpful. But when I see a story in the papers about another crash of someone on a small capacity bike I think, could something or additional training have prevented it. so I think additional training should be provided free of charge from some central government body, paid for by the euro government people that have all our money.

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muddybus

Joined:

Aug 10

Posts: 66

muddybus says:

Riding with the law

I'd love to do some advanced riding (Bikesafe etc), but I worry that it'll cost me more in fines once they measure my numberplate, see my dark visor, see the 'only for close circuit use' on my pipes. If I thpught they would overlook these, I'm sure me and lots of others would participate more, and that would make the roads safer.

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