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McCabage

Joined:

Aug 12

Posts: 21

McCabage says:

Restricted 250 cc on CBT?

Hi all, I'm pretty sure you can't but I'm just wondering. Can you restrict a 250 cc and ride it after your CBT? 


I want a Hyosung GT125R but its an expensive 125 to get and I've found that you can get the 250 versions for less money. The 250 would mean that I would take longer to out-grow it. 

If you can restrict the 250 to ride with L plates then anyone know what that'd cost? 

Cheers all
Sean

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  • Posted 2 years ago (01 September 2012 20:54)

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adaytona

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 678

adaytona says:

Restricted 250

Simple answer is no you can't do it. As a new rider on a provisional licence you are restricted to a 125cc motorcycle not exceeding 15 bhp. There is no other way around it unfortunately.


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preunit

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 11613

preunit says:

No can do mate

a CBT intitles you to ride a motorcycle which has an engine up to 125 cc and a power output not exceeding 11 kilowatt (kw) :upset:

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McCabage

Joined:

Aug 12

Posts: 21

McCabage says:

Ok thanks

Thanks Adaytona and Preunit, I will either get the Hyosung GT125R or a Honda CBR 125


Any advice on which one to get? 

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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adaytona

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 678

adaytona says:

.....

11 KW = 14.75 bhp


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adaytona

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 678

adaytona says:

Hyosung or CBR ?

Horses for courses, have a go on eace one and see how you feel. But on looks alone a prefer the Hyosung.


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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4618

philehidiot says:

Well

the Hyosung is heavier if I remember rightly and therefore not as quick. It also is not as reliable as a Honda. I remember looking at one of the Hyosungs and the quality of some of it was dire and wouldn't last a winter here.


If you're buying second hand and plan on selling it on then the Honda is the way to go as it'll last with little depreciation.

With a 125 what you want to do is buy something that's already depreciated and that'll hold its value well whilst you put another few thousand miles on it so you can sell it at a similar value and put it towards the bigger bike. Obviously that's only possible with a private sale on both ends which isn't sensible for anyone new to bikes - remember the machine being mechanically sound is what keeps you alive.

I'd buy cheapish from a dealer and then part exchange at the same dealer when you get your test passed. If they sold it, they know it was decent in the first place and therefore you just need to keep it cosmetically clean and tidy to retain a decent value.

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preunit

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 11613

preunit says:

Honda

better built,better spares,better residuals.......Yep, it's the Honda.:wink:

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McCabage

Joined:

Aug 12

Posts: 21

McCabage says:

Honda it is

I will try get the Honda to be honest, its not as big and doesn't look as good but it should ride and commute better than the GT125R which is what's important I guess. 


For the first time now I really want a big bike xD Wish I'd never found this site, I wouldn't wana bike and my mum would be a lot happier. Oh well I'll talk her round and get a CBR if I can afford it 

Thanks for all the advice guys

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4618

philehidiot says:

Just

go carefully and remember that a motorcycle tyre has to provide its grip using two contact patches, one the size of a postage stamp and the other about as big as your palm.


Cars do it with four patches the size of books so just don't take the piss with the throttle and round corners. Car drivers will try and knock you off. They ignore the potential consequences and try and kill you through stupidity and through incompetence. Fit your bike with a big horn - Stebel Magnum is a good choice as it just swaps out with the original with no extra wiring. Also get replacement high power bulbs. Check the size and go and find some that are the same wattage but put out extra light. Don't go for higher wattage as you can melt the reflector.

Ride cautiously and refrain from filtering until you've got decent control over the bike. Get practising emergency stops.

Consider getting a hivi as well. There's debate over whether it helps but I can tell you that out of a group of cyclists, I notice the one in the hivi a lot further off.

Also, do not EVER EVER EVER EVER ride in the gutter or move out of the way so people can go past. You want to be in the centre of your lane and do not yield. That extra space gives you something to move into for when morons overtake you really close or overtake coming the other way into your path.

A lot of new riders neglect their chains. Find out how to lube it and adjust it. I've seen them come off before and the rider was lucky it didn't take his ankle off or wrap around itself. It's potentially fatal if it comes off at speed or round a bend.

Read through the riding skills posts. There are some stupid questions and stupid answers in there but there's a lot of gold that is real world advice that'll stand you in good stead.

Oh and a big bike is good in some ways but you'll never get the fun of thrashing full throttle all over the place and trying to make everything flow sweetly to get the best speed that you get with a 125. Something about a big engine spoils the planning and strategy that comes with getting a 125 through traffic.

Drug fuelled ramble over.

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DrFutura

Joined:

Apr 07

Posts: 466

DrFutura says:

Usual prejudice ....

the Hyosung is probably a lot bigger. It will "last a winter" easily. I had one for over two years and it was fine, only needed service and chain and sprockets in that time. Never failed to start even after being left for six weeks. If you are a midget go for the Honda.

Personally I think both are way overpriced anyway, and the Hondas are not even built in Japan.

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