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nicktaylor7

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 5

nicktaylor7 says:

transfer?

basically I have recently moved into my 33bhp restriction period, and have gone for a restricted fazer 600. I love the bike, but i just feel its lacking in the handling department. compared to my old 125 it feels heavy and slow, like once im in a corner or bend there's no room for moving or changing lines. my friends tease me as i have knee sliders that look brand new :unsure:. was wondering if it was worth transfering to a 400, something like a vfr or rvf, to boost my confidence in corners? looking for someone who may have experience in either or both of these bikes, thanks guys

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  • Posted 2 years ago (11 September 2012 22:33)

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3071

AdieR says:

Don't know

how long you've had it, but if as you say it's a relatively recent thing, then you will need time to get used to the bike and it's weight compared to a 125.

I'm not convinced changing the bike will help a huge amount.

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smidget

Joined:

Nov 07

Posts: 2307

smidget says:

First off

The new looking knee sliders, set about them with an angle grinder if its that important to look as though you ride on a race track.

As for the Fazers handling, how long have you actually had the bike, days? weeks? months?

How old is the bike?

Has it been properly maintained and in good order?

If its a couple of years old has the suspension been serviced correctly?

Is the suspension setup correctly for your weight?

What tyres are on the bike? are they correctly inflated?

Are the wheels in alignment?

And so it goes on, motorcycling is not a case of jump on it and ride it is a case of look after the machine and it will look after you and more so when you get it wrong.

Have you questioned whether it is the bike and not your riding style which is causing your lack of confidence in cornering with the bike.

An old Gentleman who I worked for when I was 14 who had a bike workshop, nothing fancy, told me that 

"Any fool can ride a bike and ride it fast, the good rider is the one that is able each and every time to stop before hitting the brick wall".

Start to understand how the bike works, ride it slow to start with and time will teach you how to ride the bike well.

Hope you sort the problem and then enjoy a lifetime of riding.

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MarcusMarsh

Joined:

Aug 09

Posts: 2698

MarcusMarsh says:

FZS Handling

This is probably a familiarity thing.  You are progressing onto a larger machine which is not only physically bigger but also heavier.  What you consider to be 'heavy and slow' are characterisitics that someone more familiar with larger machines would call 'stable and planted'.  Likewise someone who has ridden larger machines for any time will probably consider a 125 to be bit flighty if they rode one. 

On the assumption that your machine is in good condition, take the trouble to set up the suspension properly for you.  There are a lot of good guides to doing this on the net, with a bike like the Fazer it's not a black art and you will find that it is well worth doing.   

The other consideration is your riding - if you usually need to change lines in a bend then you are not looking far enough ahead.  (Something you may get away with on a 125 but you won't on larger/faster machines)  Raise your observation and look further down the road.  Look far enough ahead to enable you to enter the bend at the correct speed to go round it without having to change your line or speed.

I am sure that soon you will get used to the bike and adapt your riding accordingly.  

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nicktaylor7

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 5

nicktaylor7 says:

suspension etc

thanks guys, i was thinking of doing the haslam race school, if i could ever afford it!! and with regards to suspension, tyres etc, ive got bridgestone BT 10's, running 34 psi front, 38 rear. this is a couple of psi up on manufacturer's settings, as i hear it aids turn in? suspension wise the front is non adjustable, i hear thicker/progresive springs and heavier oil make a difference, anyone have experience of this? also rear shock is preload only, and is set on 7 i think. however, bike has been lowered, so do i need to invest in some shorter linkages? thanks for the help guys :smile

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nicktaylor7

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 5

nicktaylor7 says:

also...

ive had the bike about 3 months, but covered 1k miles there abouts, is there anything i can do to the bike that'l make a drastic difference? or should i just grow up and accept im not the doctor?:unsure: ohh and the bike is a 99 model, covered 15000 miles and has been well looked after

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3071

AdieR says:

Tyre pressures

should be 33 / 36 for normal running (36/42 loaded or two-up) (my Fazer is on BT-020 Bridgestones). Back preload, your standard setting is 3 (I run 5 loaded).

Bear in mind also, if your tyres are a bit unevenly worn, that can cause strange handling too.

Put your bike on those (standard) settings and see how you get on.

I'm also agreeing with smidget and MM here - with your relative lack of experience, it's possible you're making errors unwittingly and unsettling the bike, plus it takes time to "bond" with a bike too.

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cairnsie13

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 267

cairnsie13 says:

Just take your time dont be pushed

into forcing yourself to go faster than you feel comfortable. Youll end up coming off. Slow in fast out is a good way to go, maybe your going into a corner too fast finding you having to correct mid corner and its making the bike feel rubbish. Also follow a more experienced rider and watch there lines, it helped me. I found i got faster without trying and just flow more with the bike. Marcus is right a bigger bike is more "stable and planted" you cant throw it around as much as a 125.

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