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JShone

Joined:

Oct 12

Posts: 2

JShone says:

Are New Tyres Slippery

I can't see a thread on this subject so wanted to get an expert opinion on a situation I am currently in.

A few months ago I decided to get in to motorbikes. Without any previous experience or knowledge about motorbikes I took my CBT.

The following week I went to a well known motorbike dealership and told them I wanted a 125 motorbike. They recommended one to me which I subsequently purchased and had delivered.

When it was delivered I took it for too rides in the sunshine and did about 30 miles, then 3 days after receiving it I took it out in the evening after it had stopped raining. Just coming of a roundabout the back wheel slipped and the bike tipped and I wrote the bike of and injured myself.

Here is my concern, up until this point I was sat at the side of the road thinking I’m never going to ride a bike again but when the recovery truck came the mechanic took one look at the bike and said “no wonder you came of it mate, new tyres need scrubbing in and yours still have the bobbles on them, new tyres are notoriously slippery” He also told me how he has ridden bikes all his life and every time he gets new tyres the garage warns him to go steady for the first 100miles.

Now I took my bike to a garage three days later, when I was able to walk again properly, and I asked the owner about slippery new tyres and he echoed the words of the recovery agent. I also went to another motorbike dealership and talked to the manager who also agreed with the fact tyres need scrubbing in.

All this has left me puzzled as at no point during the selection purchase and handover of my new bike was any safety advice given. Also, there was a sticker on the tank saying read the manual before use, but no where in the 4 pages of safety advice does it mention tyre scrub in or slippery tyres at all.

I would like to know MCN’s expert opinion on whether there is a hazard with new tyres

 

Regards

 

Jonathan

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  • Posted 2 years ago (18 October 2012 16:34)

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preunit

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 11886

preunit says:

Are New Tyres Slippery?

Yes.....

from the MCN "How best to scrub in new tyres" advice.

the release agent that is left on tyres to get them out of the mould does take a little time to wear off.

There is no set period for this, as it's dependant on temperature, type of bike and road surface.

All the firms advise riders to take it easy for up to 100 miles, making sure the tyres are up to working temperature before cornering too hard and going easy on the throttle and the brake throughout that running-in period.

Never had any probs myself, I just take it easy for a couple of days or so.

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preunit

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 11886

preunit says:

If it's any

consollation you're not the only one.

New Gixxer :biggrin::ph43r:

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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eatcs01

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 3261

eatcs01 says:

tyres

New car tyres are slippy too.

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Yep

new tyres are slippery - not just release agent, but also the fact that they're absolutely smooth when new.

Like your recovery mechanic, my garage also tend to give a "easy on the gas" warning after fitting new rubber.

Conti's Road Attack 2 tyres come pre-scrubbed, but I'd still be inclined to be gentle for the first 100-odd miles (don't know if they're available in 125 sizes).  

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jaffa90

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 8826

jaffa90 says:

new tyres

On every new bike or tyres fitted i`ve bought i have always been warned about new tyres.

When back home i clean them with meths.

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cairnsie13

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 267

cairnsie13 says:

Makes a big

difference, mate binned his bike going round a roundabout on new tyre he literally just put on and he was taking it easy for the most part

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bbstrikesagain

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 878

Some dealers

even print the warning on the invoice, hand-write it to to make sure you spot it, then make you counter-sign that you've read it.


New tyres can be seriously grip-less.  Surely a newbie should be told how to break them in.

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4697

philehidiot says:

I've had 3

tyre changes where it has started snowing just whilst they were changing it.


Now that's a fun combination.

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JShone

Joined:

Oct 12

Posts: 2

JShone says:

Update

Thankyou everyone for your opinions it is obviously no secret that tyres are slippier. Its interesting to hear that some dealers print or write it on receipts. Out of interest do you know any places that do this?

 

To update everyone on the story so far, i have filed a claim against the dealer and was hoping they would settle with me. However i found out yesterday that they are not amitting any liability for the incident as it is "not there duty to warn there customers of the hazards of new tyres". They only have a duty to ensure the quality. This is wrong as if it can be proved that new tyres are slippier they have a duty to warn all customers under the "product safety regulations 2005"

Does anyone have any ideas how i can prove the fact new tyres are slippier, bearing in mind i can't find any offcial word on the subject.

I have instructed a registered expert on the subject and he agrees i should have been warned.

 

Let me know your thoughts all

 

Thankyou for your responses so far

 

Jonathan

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preunit

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 11886

preunit says:

From Bridgestone

In order for your new tyres to provide optimum performance Bridgestone strongly advises that they should be ridden very cautiously for at least the first 125 miles / 200 km in order to condition and settle them on the rim, this allows the tread surface to be “scuffed-in” and function properly.

The tyres should then be checked to ensure correct seating and inflation. After this initial period, lean-angles and acceleration and braking forces can be gradually increased. Please remember that the tyre works most efficiently after it reaches its operating temperature.

Directly after the tyres are mounted, sudden acceleration, maximum braking and hard cornering must be avoided. This will also allow the rider to adjust to the “feel” and handling characteristics of the new tyres. It is also recommended that immediately after fitting a new tyre, the dealer or fitter should ensure that the tread surface is not contaminated in any way (e.g. by excess fitting lubricant). It is also advised that the tread surface should be “buffed” with a dry cloth around the circumference, please also ensure that the label is removed before use.

To sum up, the running in of tyres serves several purposes:

  • The tyre needs to settle itself onto the wheel rim.
  • The various components of the tyre (carcass, tread strip, etc.) need to settle in to one another.
  • When tyres are new the tread has a smooth surface and this surface needs to be “scuffed-in” to obtain maximum grip.
  • The rider is able to get used to the new tyre and ride accordingly.

 

Legally another matter mind...might be worth contacting

Andrew at http://www.bikelawyer.co.uk/  (MCN legal advisor) and see what he has to say.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

unit.

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