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SadPanda1993

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 17

SadPanda1993 says:

Bigger bike fears

Hi everyone.

i'm pleased to say i passed my A2 test last week first time. was overjoyed. filled with excitement i ignored my friends family and my common sense and went straight out two days later and put down a deposit on a 1994 honda CB 400 SF. i'll have the bike by Wednesday next week and i'm now getting a bit nervous about saying goodbye to my 125. i think the scariest thing is the weight to me. controlling it at low speeds etc or dropping it when pushing it. dont get me wrong i'm dead excited. i guess being a bit worried is a good thing as i should treat it with respect. but any tips on how to get used to a bigger bike would be fantastic

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  • Posted 2 years ago (04 November 2012 23:10)

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jaffa90

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 8821

jaffa90 says:

Bigger

Going bigger or a new bike,it`s normal to be nervous.

Just take it easy and live longer, keep the revs lower,more so this time of year.

Remember it`s your right hand that controls the speed.  

Also no bullsh*t when did you have your eyes tested?

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MarcusMarsh

Joined:

Aug 09

Posts: 2694

MarcusMarsh says:

Bigger bike

125 to 400 is not too big a jump and you'll be fine.  Just take it easy until you adjust to the new machine.  In many ways you will find the 400 to be easier to ride than the 125.  It will be better planted on the road and will keep up with traffic flow a lot easier - both of which will instill confidence. 

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SadPanda1993

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 17

SadPanda1993 says:

Thanks

cheers guys. i'll ahve the thing restricted so i might make it harder to wrap myself round a lampost. seat time and patience i'm sure will be the best way to build confidence. had my eyes tested few months ago. why?

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fogie

Joined:

Jan 04

Posts: 809

fogie says:

weight of the bike

Within five minutes of riding it, you'll wonder what you were afraid of. :smile  It will feel fast, compared to your present bike, so just take it easy for a while, especially in this weather, but most of all, enjoy it  :biggrin:


edit, I only weigh ten stone, and ride a ZZR1200, weighs about as much as a double decker bus, but easy enough.... :lol:

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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bmwgs

Joined:

Mar 10

Posts: 1032

bmwgs says:

.

the bike will feel fast even with 33bhp.as most 125 bike at toped out at 60.

i went from a 125 that was flat out at 50mph to a r100gs clamped to 33bhp for 2years now been riding the bike at full bhp for 3years now 5years in all . i am only 9stone.  and can ride the bike 2up with only one foot flat til the wife is on the back.

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Steveyman

Joined:

Jan 08

Posts: 616

Steveyman says:

Bigger bike

I had a GP 125 and a GSXR 750 I only rode the 125 as a matter of having to just to give it a run. It felt like a motorised push bike compared to the GSXR.

Bigger bikes are faster, and have very good brakes to slow it down, but most of all they are certainly a lot more stable.

They are only heavy when you are about to drop it, so knowing where you are putting your feet is a must when on uneven surfaces.

As for slow riding, balance is the key. If you are well balanced the weight is not a problem, just takes a bit of practice.

Hope this helps.

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Beelady

Joined:

Jan 10

Posts: 3296

Beelady says:

Dropping it when pushing it?

I can't push my bike at all (for boring reasons we won't go into here) but I have manage fine for 5 years, without ever pushing it.

You have to plan where you are going to stop. Always park on level or slightly uphill ground. Make sure you can either roll out of the space backwards or ride out forwards. Make the engine do the work for you.

When I put my bike away I have to roll, backwards, down a steep slope. This means it is facing the right way to ride out uphill. It took a bit of practice but it means I can manage all on my own and not have to wait for someone to come and help.

Try looking at places you need to stop often. Home, work, local shop. You'll quickly suss the easiest places to park and nobody will know you're just taking the easy way out.

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jaffa90

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 8821

jaffa90 says:

eyes

Eye test,i thought my eyes were ok until i nearly came a cropper not seing brakes lights in the middle of a light cluster on a VW and more now.

I could read a number plate at the legal given distance but my right eye was fading so i`ve opted for specs to try and keep alive.

No bullsh*t. 

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SadPanda1993

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 17

SadPanda1993 says:

Thanks guys

All great advice, thanks very much. My bike is arriving today and this ahs to be the longest day of work in my life. Looking forward to trying it round the block and getting a feel for it all.

good thinking with 'letting the engine do the work for you' i avoided doing that with my 125 as any use of the engine at low speeds was frankly embarasing as it sounded like i wanted to start racing somewhere.

in terms of eyesight i wear glasses all the time so i get them checked regularly. though its not something i would have thought of so thank you

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James600zx

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 2759

James600zx says:

Congratulations!

Regarding pushing a heavier bike around, try leaning it on your hip a bit. Cover the front brake lever and don't slam it on, ease it. The latter applies to coming to a stop while riding too; rolling up to a petrol pump, for example. Fully centre the bars/front wheel just before stopping so the bike is vertical and stable. Manage that momentum.

You'll love it.

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