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LearnerRider

Joined:

May 12

Posts: 111

LearnerRider says:

Rusty nuts and bolts

Hi I have some rusty nuts and bols on my scooter that I want to try and clean up a bit. Any solutions that will remove this?

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  • Posted 2 years ago (05 November 2012 17:02)

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smoto5

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 4548

smoto5 says:

Cheapest and quickest

solution would be go to the car accessories shop or a well stocked bike shop and get suitable rust treatment chemicals, some will just paint over the surface neutralising and stopping further corrosion and can also be painted over in a desired colour, some will strip the rust off AND the plating to bare metal and may also eat away at any alloy and some other metals, so make sure you get suitable ones! and protective gear, gloves etc. read the labels before buying! 

If going down the route of using stainless and alloy fasteners, they MUST be of a suitable grade of material, inner casings like crankcases need higher tensile bolts, outer casings without loadings are less critical, but even there that may depend on what else is bolted to a scooters casings, some of it forms part of the chassis in effect. Also you may require sutable greases to fit the bolts, stainless is notorious for having rougher surface on threads, causing more difficulty in  achieving correct torque settings, titanium bolts also require specific greases as well. There is also galvanic action or electrolytic corrosion to consider between dis-similar materials, another reason for the grease, this is accelerated if you are riding in winter with the salty roads. 
Finally, do not use aluminium alloy bolts on safety related items like brake caliper and brake lever mounts, use steel, stainless steel, or titanium of high  tensile specification. 

Tabasco, are non of your bolts sent for plating, galvanising, sheradising, anodising, or any of the other processes suitable for different materials? how long do they last? are they being regularly re-covered in grease and oil? or are they in constant immersion in non corrosive fluids? or are we talking huge nuts (lol) and bolts on bridges with repeated paint or other coatings? :hmmm:

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KrismusSikpunz

Joined:

Mar 12

Posts: 1286

High tensile bolts

are not plated.

 

But I'm sure you are aware of that.

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smoto5

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 4548

smoto5 says:

I presume you are addressing me,

Mr Sikpunz/Mr Krismus (not sure which might be your family name as I know not what religion you may be or from where in the world, sounds foreign to me anyway)

Anyhow, you can in fact have plated high tensile bolts, although electroplating runs a high risk of the resultant hydrogen embrittlement causing failure, this would of course be very dependant on which particular plating process and for how long, incidentally acid cleaning, particularly long term soaking methods will also give rise to similar problems (some unpleasant chemicals are used in electroplating and the electric currents contribute to accelerating those effects) but it is possible, varying subsequent heat processes can be used to minimise the resultant effects.

Also there are varying hot dip processes possible which avoid those problems (have a look at wire mesh livestock fences, which use tensile wire and galvanising)

It is also possible to mechanically plate components using fine powdered metals to coat the items, and various heat treatment processes also impart a certain level of corrosion protection, there's a whole array of possibilities, and some processes have fallen into disuse on cost or complexity or time grounds.

Besides all this, I never actually specified any particular treatment on any particular material in the first place , did I? :hmmm:

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KrismusSikpunz

Joined:

Mar 12

Posts: 1286

Wire brush..........

and silver paint.

 

From a distance, it'll be fine.

 

And much safer than removing all those fasteners.

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