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zosokam

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 21

zosokam says:

GSXR touring?

Hello everyone. Having had a bandit 650 for a while and enjoying every bit of it, I'm now seriously thinking of going sportbike and buying a 2011 GSXR 600. While I really like the trackday capability of this bike, I would also like to use it on relatively short tours (anything from 2 to 5 hours), possibly 2 up, from time to time. Is it not such a good idea on a gixxer?
Also, is it really true that having tired and hurting wrists and arms mean that your position on the bike and use of your muscles is wrong? Thanks for your help

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  • Posted 2 years ago (13 November 2012 21:06)

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SlowLearner

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 1993

SlowLearner says:

gsxr touring

Hey dude - I've got a 2001 gsxr600, and can testify that it does indeed knacker the wrists after you've been going for a good few hours.  Particularly if you've got any sort of backpack on.   If you've got the misses onboard too, 5 hours is a  l-o-n-g  ride indeed.

Not sure if the wrist problems are down to position or just a feature.   If you don't rest down on the wrists, you'll soon get an ache in the back.

Having said that, it's still damned good fun and worth trying :wink:

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zosokam

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 21

zosokam says:

SlowLearner

Looks like we've got the same dream bike he

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bbstrikesagain

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 871

depends

all day touring, no problem and yes, it does depend on how you sit, using core, ass & thighs instead of just leaning on wrists, but also how you fit the bike, how fit you are etc.  Works for me, but I'm not tall.


L1 awesome, had a very memorable weekend with one, but not sure I'd fancy it two-up, or that a pillion would either.  Not enough mass, grunt, stability to lend itself to the smooth progress a pillion might enjoy.  Less highly tuned middleweights, like your own bandit, (or bigger engined sportsbikes) are probably a better bet for two-up work.

Anything can go on track, especially something like an SV650, or a bandit 1250 makes a really useful tourer with a fair bit of get up and go.

Some insurers won't even insure a sportsbike for riding two-up any  more, so check it out.

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SlowLearner

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 1993

SlowLearner says:

correction...

mean to say 2011 gsxr600, not 2001!  Still, it looks like you knew what I meant.   I think you'll love it, as far as I'm concerned it's an absolute beauty.

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zosokam

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 21

zosokam says:

slowlearner

Yes, it looks the part. I can't wait to get!

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SlowLearner

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 1993

SlowLearner says:

zosokam: gsxr600

Hi there... when you get it, make sure the bike has a really silky-smooth engine as you rev it through.   It comes on very hard and fast (ooh, err misses!) but the delivery should be absolutely smooth, if it's in the least bit rough, you could get better. 

This bike just "fit" the way nothing else ever has, it's a personal thing though.   Depends on the sort of ride you're thinking of - I tested the CBR600RR, and it was magnificent.   The Honda struck me as more refined, the Suzuki just that much more raw.  It's what suits you at the end of the day.

Btw, age has a hell of a lot to do with how much riding on a sports-bike your wrists will take...



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Andy949494

Joined:

Feb 08

Posts: 817

Andy949494 says:

Depends on you and your riding...

I wouldn't rule  a sports bike out but would suggest its not optimal for a trip between 2-5 hours length particularly if its a boring drone along a motorway in the rain to get somewhere with a pillion and a tent.  It depends on you and your pillions attitude (and age) as to how well you will cope as well as the road. Of course the bike itself can do it:smile
Generally the comfort of a sport bike increases as the speed increases when the wind takes some weight off your wrists. They can be quite a pain around towns and they don't do U turns etc as well as a more upright bike - but the biggest critic might be your pillion since the pillion position is often very exposed and bent legged! Try and get a test ride and take it out for an hour with your pillion if that is really important to you. You might be better with a sports tourer (e.g. 5 year old ZX9 R, VFR) or a hyper tourer type bike (Busa, Blackbird, VFR12) which tend to be more comfortable and bigger if you want to do a lot of this...

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bbstrikesagain

Joined:

Nov 08

Posts: 871

Another thing about the 600L1

Induction hammer is addictive, riding solo everything about it just urges you to take liberties that you maybe shouldn't, a truly stunning piece of kit to ride, most fun I had since a Daytona 675, only bettered by the 2012 GSX-R1000 I had a go on recently...


But.. ..on bumpy stuff the 600L1 tied itself in knots.  Seemed to me like the BPF forks were spot on but the rear was a more (too?) softly sprung.  The anti-squat geometry hides this on smooth stuff.  Maybe it's deliberate as the extra compliance seems to bestow limitless grip at the rear, while the taught yet slick front end offers great feel.  Maybe it's setup from 6 stone jockeys?  Whatever, bounce the bike or jump on the pegs and you could feel the imbalance, on bumpy surfaces the two ends got completely out of sync - disconcerting.  I didn't take a pillion on it, but I'm guessing that without a lot more preload, or a stiffer spring, at the rear, it could be a handful two up.  Judicious tweaks to the damping might help, but IMO, wondrous as it is, it really isn't a two up touring machine.

Of course I can't rule out that the demo bike I had for a long weekend last summer could have been an oddball...

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SlowLearner

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 1993

SlowLearner says:

bb: gsxr as a touring bike...

hey bb... certainly would agree with you that this is definitely not designed to be a touring bike, but I don't know about the handling characteristics you describe at all!   The back end has never seemed bouncy,  nor has the back/front end got out of sync in the way you've described.  Maybe I just haven't pushed it hard enough :wink:


Misses usually likes it "hard" - we set the suspension up on the fjr that way when 2-up and it made her much happier.   Didn't complain about the gsxr at all though, even while travelling at some speed.  (But within the legal limit, oh yes!)


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zosokam

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 21

zosokam says:

L1

Sorry for this daft question. What's L1?

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