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admin

Joined:

Nov 06

Posts: 1110

admin says:

You Ask/You Answer: Old or new first bike?

I'm putting myself through the new bike test in February, and will be buying a new bike shortly afterwards (I'm not a spoilt rich kid, I've benefitted from some inheritance money). I'll have to have a sub-47bhp bike, but I can't decide which route to go: should I follow my head and just get a ratty old shonker until I've...

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  • Posted 2 years ago (04 December 2012 15:42)

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

My advice

Start on an old one for the first one - first bikes inevitably get dropped with inexperience; the newer (and more expensive) the bike, the more gutting it'll be, plus an oldie will probably be easier to insure.

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thehoss

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 15

thehoss says:

Old but not too old

I was in your shoes not long ago. I ended up buying a new ER6n, looking back on it I should have bought something a few years old. Buy new and it will lose money the minute you sit on it, you will be more worried about dropping/crashing it rather than enjoying. Buy something a couple of years old and let someone else take the depreciation. If it needs a bit of maintenance, all the better to start tinkering and learning on.

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Titosfuneral

Joined:

Feb 12

Posts: 236

Titosfuneral says:

Why waste your money?

When I first passed my test I bought an old bike.. mainly because I didn't trust myself to buy a good second hand one. What a waste of money. Within 1000 miles I'd dropped the new bike.. not badly, but enough it wasn't new any more. I'm now an advocate of second hand bikes. I'd never buy a new one again unless I was buying something that had ridiculous residual values, like a beemer. That said, if I was you and had the cash.. I'd buy something around 2 years old with under 10k on it and that hadn't been obviously dropped. That's still a new bike tbh and 30-40% cheaper depending on the bike. (ie not a beemer)

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klacto

Joined:

Oct 12

Posts: 70

klacto says:

New new new

New or nearly new. I used second hand bikes until I nearly got killed because of a mechanical fault caused by old age ( the bike not me) so new every time.

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domtrails

Joined:

Jun 12

Posts: 11

domtrails says:

A nice decent bike with a few years, the odd scratch and not too many miles - the ER6n is a perfect starter bike I have to agree.

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X2Glider

Joined:

May 10

Posts: 427

X2Glider says:

Why do so many people think that just because a rider is new that they WILL automatically drop the bike?  The percentage that do have got to be less than 1/2%.  TBH, I've never met any first time riders anywhere I've been in 25 years tha have dropped their bike their first year or 2 of riding.

 

I say get a new one if the guy finds one he likes.  He'll spend his time enjoying riding instead of maintaining and keepingthe thing running.  Nothing could sour a new rider more than finding he has to learn to be a mechanic too.

 

My only reasoning for buying used, other than cheap, is you're not out much if you find the bike's ergos and overall usefulness doesn't suit your needs.  You then can figure out what you do really want...a  daily commuter, a weekend sport bike or pack mule touring rig.

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Fomancu

Joined:

Jul 08

Posts: 179

Fomancu says:

2nd hand is best

The market needs people to buy 2nd hand-so I can buy new-I walked all the way to the bank with a huge smile on my face with a huge wad cos the idiot "needed" my old GSXR1000 "tricked up" Rizla rep( it made 202 at the rear wheel btw)--was I worried that his last bike was a 125 two stroke??  Nope--pity he wreaked it and his body 4 weeks later. snigger

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burnthouse

Joined:

May 12

Posts: 49

burnthouse says:

New or old that is the question

I would go with a good 3yr old bike first.... it will enable you to get used to the physical weight of moving the bike around, which depending on your height and build can be a lot more physical than you would first imagine. Also, don't worry about the increased power and performance, they rarely cause any problems if you've done your training. Remember, if you buy a 2nd hand bike and don't like it you can sell it for very near what you bought it for, not the case with a new bike, and you have to run a new one in apron 1000 miles normally... but when you've decided on the type of bike you want new ones have the benefit of 0% finance too in a lot of cases.

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unknowninfo

Joined:

Dec 12

Posts: 1

unknowninfo says:

I'd advise you to start on an older bike, just play it safe and get it checked out before you buy, reg checkers ect and if your not confident with the mechanical side and know a mechanic get em to look it over before you buy. You may be one of the lucky half who never drop your bike but then you also might not and replacement plastics/parts are a whole heap cheaper for older models, as long as you don't pick a rare machine or do as I did and bought a bike with the word triumph written on it lol. In my opinion its also worth tinkering with your bike a bit, learn the basics without needing a degree in engineering, I personally like to know that if I'm stuck by the side of the road and its something basic I can fix it without the aid of the aa/rac guy laughing as he tightens a spark plug cable or reconnects the ignition kill switch after I've been sat there for an hour in the rain waiting for him to show. But whatever you choose, dont be rushed, choose the correct bike for you, size, weight, ect, and enjoy it. Stay safe

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d0nkeychop

Joined:

May 10

Posts: 26

d0nkeychop says:

No question....

...get a used jap from a dealer, you can buy with peace of mind and usually with finance and warranty available. You'll save a packet and be able to spend it on touring, training and track days instead.

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