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Anonymous

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Matthew Birt  says:

Casey Stoner memories: Lucio Cecchinello

In the sixth part of MCN’s exclusive series of Stoner memories, Lucio Cecchinello, who gave Stoner his first Grand Prix ride and big break into MotoGP in 2006, talks about their time together. “We played a big part in the early story of Casey when we worked with him for one season in 125s, two in 250s and one in MotoGP. "At...

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  • Posted 2 years ago (20 December 2012 15:38)

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wosihound

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Jul 12

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wosihound says:

Don't be silly.

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Farnarkle

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Farnarkle says:

Feeling a bit lost?

"Resources count for nothing if the man in charge doesn't have a clue how to effectively translate proven rider feedback into design that moves the project forward."

So if it was all Preziosi's fault that Rossi's input didn't achieve anything, who was the 'man in charge' that faithfully pursued Stoner's desired development path and took the bike from hero to zero?  Dear me, I do believe that it was the very same guy!  I guess it must have been all down the the fact that  'Prezza' Preziosi couldn't understand Rossi's language, eh?, whereas those two scheming Aussies together baked a shit pie out of the finest ingrediants. I guess you'd have to include some input into development from 'Gazza' Guareschi and 'Chrisso' Gabarini also.  

Obviously, what Rossi needed was someone who could translate his comments into meaningful 'Strine to get the message across.  Geez, if he'd only had the benefit of an Aussie crew chief, how different it all might have been.

Actually, to be fair, I don't think you should discount the theory that Ducati just didn't want an Italian rider to do any good on their bike. Just look at their history: threw Capirossi away, threw Melandri away, pandered to every development whim of an Aussie and have stuck with a Yank even up to the point of making him lead rider!  An Italian like Rossi just didn't stand a chance in that team, nationalistic pride wouldn't let them have an Italian rider be successful.  Sure, it cost them a motza of rider salary to hide their evil intent, but hey, the results tell the real story.      

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wosihound

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wosihound says:

C'mon now..

 

I know you're hurting but can you please man-up and leave all this petty silliness behind?

Stoner was a fantastic rider but he couldn't develop a cold in a fridge.

His stubborn attitude cost him the chance to go out in a blaze of glory this season gone..and it turned the Ducati into a Pup.

Here's what Nakamoto had to say about him very recently.

When Casey has confidence in himself and takes each race steadily, there is no other rider who can beat his speed. But then we had that crash in the final lap of Round Eight in Germany, and all our plans went out the window.

In that race, he didn’t even need to win—finishing behind Dani would have been good enough. It was impatience that led to his crash and a no-point race result. And this led to his behavior at the following GP in Italy—he couldn’t calm down and get his set-up done properly, and rode a poor race to finish eighth which knocked him right back in the championship points table.

If only he had finished properly in Germany, he would likely have ridden as steadily as usual in the following races and possibly would have escaped injury in Round 11 at Indianapolis.

When it came to choosing his bike too, while Dani was full of praise for the new chassis, Casey reckoned it wasn’t much different and stuck with the older one. It wasn’t just Dani—Stefan liked the new chassis and used it for the final GP at Valencia, and when Alvaro tried it in the post-season test he also declared it excellent.

Now that I think on it, pushing Casey to test the new bike after the Italy GP was maybe a mistake. I guess I should have waited a bit longer until he had regained his composure. If I’d waited, he might have been able to see things clearer and appreciate the quality of new bike.

I wouldn’t say his personality is completely mature yet.

 

Still..take heart. The rest of the story makes good reading and Shuei is full of praise. He even gives a glimmer of hope for glummer than glum #27ers who hope they haven't seen the end of the contrary Australian.

 

 http://www.sportrider.com/news/146_13010_honda_nakamoto_reveals_thoughts_on_2012_motogp_season/viewall.html#ixzz2HMOQTrrf

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Farnarkle

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Farnarkle says:

Ahh, the benefit of hindsight

No, Wosi, I'm not hurting at all - I'm glad to see Stoner out of there mostly in one piece. AFAIC, he did well - not perfectly, but well - in his time in motoGp and topped any statistics that can be bought to bear, and now he wants to do different things. FFS, after 23 years of his life focus being the moment the flag drops / lights go out,  who wouldn't become jaded?  He doesn't need to keep a motoGp-based business churning along, he is happy to have achieved the top spot at the top level for 6 years, at least in terms of winning races, which is what he was there for, he's retired a fairly happy chappy.  As far as the famous Stoner-Rossi rivalry goes, he can rest content that he left valued at $15m for a season by his current employer, apparently more than five times what Rossi is valued by Yamaha next year.  He can retire knowing he gave European motorcycling manufacture its best results since Agostini.

I'm sad we won't see magic on a stick through Stoner Corner any more, but that's life. 

Yes, I'm playing the tease with you - at least you have an adult's ability to respond (even if it does seem at times you must be in a home for the terminally bewildered) unlike the ADD/Asperger's/drooling pre-pubescent mononeuronic rantings of Milky or Supermario - both of whose parents must be on stand-down from t'mill and monitoring use of the tenement computer at the moment. 

Rossi was and is a fantastic rider - but he ain't god. Stoner was a fantastic rider, and he ain't the devil. Stoner is inextricably a part of the Rossi story - like Julius Caesar and the British Isles, Stoner came, saw, conquered and left; Rossi has survived and lives to fight another day.  Trying to twist the stats so that Stoner's success is devalued is a hopeless task; think of it as, if you want, a total eclipse of the sun. Now that Stoner has gone, Rossi has an opportunity to shine again, coming up in the east and setting in the west as always. The eclipse happened, it's a matter of record, and now it's passed.

That Rossi has survived the Stoner era is a testament to his character.  That Stoner has achieved enough in motoGp to want more to spend his life with his beautiful wife and child (who just HAs to be the most-publicised rugrat in motorsport history!) than to continue flogging Rossi et al. is also a testament to character - unless you have no children, even you, Wosi, would understand that. 

In the immortal words of  either P.T Barnum or Walt Disney: 'always leave 'em wanting more'. Stoner has done that; and I hope that Rossi will also do that,but the next couple of years will tell.  Certainly, Rossi has left Ducati wanting more and Stoner left Honda wanting more and putting a pretty incredible figure on it - the highest price they have ever paid for a rider/driver.  Stoner walked out on the most lucrative offer on anybody's table for 2013. The only other rider Honda have ever paid such attention to was Hailwood, of blessed memory.

Rossi has seen off Stoner: beaten but not killed.  There is no statistic nor any confabulation of the circumstances that will ever change that. The sooner you can relinquish your desire to manipulate history, the happier you will be.  I do hope, for your sake, that Rossi vindicates your faith in the next two or so seasons, lest you be carried away by large, friendly gentlemen in white coats while wearing a vest with sleeves that tie behind your back.  However, if that does happen, just maybe Stoner can be persuaded to send you a nice fresh Barramundi for Christmas. - they are fabulous eating.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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wosihound

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wosihound says:

During Stoner's time in MotoGP, seven years..he beat Rossi three times.

Rossi beat him four times.

It's as simple as that Pal..hardly a total eclipse of the Sun and a good beating.

Suck it up big boy..

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PaceyCasey

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Jun 11

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PaceyCasey says:

wosi

And during their time aboard 'factory machinery' bud? Or is that too fair a comparison?

God loves a trier.

 

 

 

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doohanfan

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doohanfan says:

farnarkling

Very high class farnarkle there wosi, you have I fear met your match.

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Farnarkle

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Posts: 98

Farnarkle says:

Wosi, I apologise

Geez, I've obviously upset you. Ok, it was a stretch calling you adult, which implies a level of cognitive ability that it must hurt not to have, but I didn't mean to tear the scab from old wounds, but I was, really, truly just trying to be friendly.  You adherence to your cause is commendable, and I guess you'd probably take offence if I repeated the old saw that every organ grinder needs his monkey, since monkeys are often amiable, intelligent little critters and  I can see how you would feel slighted by not measuring up.  Therefore, I won't mention that.

However, you really owe it to yourself to look back in wonder before you quote statistics.  Rossi and Stoner have lined up on the same grid a total of 108 times. They've cancelled each other out once by both DNFing in the same race, but of the other 107 results, Stoner took the honours in 65, leaving Rossi finishing better only 42 times. Yes, that's over Stoner's entire motoGp career, including his rookie year.  In easily-understood terms,for the hard of comprehension, that means that for every two times Rossi beat Stoner, he was beaten three times by Stoner.

That's what really counts, Wosi, in the measure of the two riders.  The WC is a construct of points awarded, but the nitty-gritty is simply this: two men start a race, one comes home ahead of the other. Six times out of every ten, the one who came home ahead, was Stoner.

ust because your mother ran away from you before you were born doesn't mean you can avoid running away from reality all your life.  Who finishes ahead of who is the unqualifiable measure of racing, and in that regard, it's Stoner, me bucko, who holds the trophy.

 

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doohanfan

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doohanfan says:

rossi's length of time at the top

Like your work  Farnarkle as I have said.

What rossi did do though as mick doohan has said was stay at the absolute pinnacle of gp bike racing for over a decade, a rather hard trick to manage, which nobody else has done, apart from agostini I guess, including mick himself (as he has acknowledged) and stoner. It takes enormous physical and mental toughness and enormous will to win as well as absolute talent to do this. All of the overlap of stoner's and rossi's careers also occurred after valentino turned 27, the age at which stoner has chosen to retire.

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weskit

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Jun 10

Posts: 510

weskit says:

excellent article wosi

Hardly a great shock that a 27 year old isn't at full maturity. Full of praise for his ex-rider and would take him back in a second. I also thought his comments on Rossi were quite telling. Absolutely none. Not even when discussing who Marquez will need to beat this year to grab his first MotoGP win.

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