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Anonymous

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Matthew Birt  says:

Casey Stoner memories: Lucio Cecchinello

In the sixth part of MCN’s exclusive series of Stoner memories, Lucio Cecchinello, who gave Stoner his first Grand Prix ride and big break into MotoGP in 2006, talks about their time together. “We played a big part in the early story of Casey when we worked with him for one season in 125s, two in 250s and one in MotoGP. "At...

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  • Posted 2 years ago (20 December 2012 15:38)

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wosihound

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Jul 12

Posts: 2668

wosihound says:

My pleasure Pal and I agree..Great interview with Nakamoto who is brutally honest and surprisingly emotional over Casey's departure.

He obviously thinks a lot of the kid and you get the feeling he blames himself to some degree.

Love to see Stoner take a year's sabbatical and return to battle with the others..everybody on good bikes, 2014.

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Farnarkle

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Farnarkle says:

Nakamoto not the only one

Interview by Steve Parrish with Guareschi in the paddock in 2010, after Stoner had announced he was going to Honda, Guareschi was on the point of tears, saying (roughly) that Ducati was losing a family member, Stoner would always be welcome back, they hoped he'd come and see them in the pits, but that they all hoped Stoner would do well in his new move. Almost like a family tearfully wishing the favourite son good luck as he goes out into the world and reminding him that the fatted calf will be awaiting his return.

The people who worked closely with Stoner all seem to have both enjoyed that time and have great respect for him - diametrically opposite to the image projected by the knockers.  You might find it instructive to do some research on Hailwood's character, and his relationship with his team with whom he preferred to hang out rather than do the PR/WC media star bullshit. Gabbarini has talked about Stoner staying in the pit box late into the night as the team worked on a problem, finally curling up and going to sleep under the workbench rather than leave the guys with the problem unsolved.  It might help you understand why Stoner used 'we' so much more than 'I' in relation to the whole racing picture.   

 

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Bultoboy

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Apr 11

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Bultoboy says:

Yes, one of the more dissapointing things to happen in Motogp for me was Stoner leaving Ducati. I really hoped he would have stayed and that they could have got back to a point where he could consistently challenge for wins. To an outsider like me, just a spectator, they really did seem like a tight-knit family and I agree entirely with what you say about the team spirit and his reference to "we".

There was just nothing like seeing him come out of the pits in qualifying and set about forcing and bullying that beautiful red bike around the track. A lone red arrow amidst the hords of Jap machinery. Watching it buck and squirm was always a highlight and something I'll always remember. No-one rode a bike like he rode that Ducati. I'm no Ducati fan and have never had any inclination to own one, but there was just something magical about the style of that red bike, blood red paint to go with blood red leathers. No stupid personal gimmicks to spoil the lines, just a brutal looking machine.

When he went to Honda I was dissapointed as I've never been a Honda fan. I thought it sad when he rode the Ducati into the pits for the last time

I'd love to see a wildcard entry at PI on a Ducati...

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Farnarkle

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Farnarkle says:

Now there's an interesting thing

In the quote by Wosi about Nakamoto's interview, there is a reference to Stoner not being fully mature.  Strangely, those words do not appear in any other iteration of that interview - not in the actual article cited, not in the HRC published version, not actually anywhere else on the web.

I guess Wosi has let us in on a secret only he knows - what he reckons Nakamoto should have said.  But Nakamoto didn't say that.

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dacron

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Sep 11

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dacron says:

lord wosi

the original thread that came out 2 weeks ago did actually have shuei say something along those lines , but i think he was mistaking "not fully mature" for "impatient". stoner had made up his mind he had enough and wanted the season to hurry and end , his mind was no longer on his bike but his child.

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wosihound

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wosihound says:

Stoner only knew one way to ride..

..and that was flat-out for the win.

While I think we all respect the bravery & comitment, most understand you can't strategise all races and therefore a championship solely on this philosophy. Qualifying and the race are two different tasks requiring differing approaches.

For example..you don't have to be patient in QP.

Nakamoto doesn't say Casey is immature, rather he thinks he's not fully mature and somewhat impatient.

I don't think any rider had the red mist come down so hard as Stoner..he wanted to win every time. Admirable true, but sometimes not the smartest. 

They say when you gamble, only bet what you can afford to lose.

Did Stoner weigh-up the cons of crashing with no points in Germany next to the pros of taking 20pts and leading the title race?

Did he count in failure and how the pressure of being behind might affect his next races..where he made further errors, compounding the situation?

Casey has had luck with injuries considering crashes..he used to bounce well before he was a Dad.

I think Stoner knew he couldn't carry on with his philosophy of win or bin. He talked about his Assen practice crash as one of the biggest and hardest hits on his head. It scared him as a Father.

Then we had Germany, Italy and finally America. His Missus was probably apoplectic with worry given he was retiring,

A fantastic talent and given circumstances, always a threat to be fastest.

Best racer ever?..Nah! not even close.

 

 

 

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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Farnarkle

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Jan 13

Posts: 98

Farnarkle says:

Well said, Wosi

And for once, I agree with most of it!  As I said earlier in this thread, at least you have the capacity to be adult about it, unlike some on here.

But, let's take one point:

"They say when you gamble, only bet what you can afford to lose.

Did Stoner weigh-up the cons of crashing with no points in Germany next to the pros of taking 20pts and leading the title race?"

Self-evidently, he did not.  But let's be objective:  what rider, in 2006, tossed away the lead in and his chance of taking the WC in the last race of the season, despite starting on pole?  And how old was he? I do believe he was about 27 years old... talk about a muggins who couldn't think about the WC strategy when it was on the plate in front of him.

Of course, the ultimate irony there was that the rider he crashed out trying to overtake was the guy who came 8th in the WC, no threat to his WC position: a rookie on a satellite bike, named Casey Stoner.

What rider crashed from the lead in the penultimate race of 2012, trying to stay ahead of the third-placed rider in the WC - and no threat to his WC chance - losing 20 possible points and, as it happened, the WC by 18 points? And how old was he? - I do believe, 27 years old.  The rider he was trying to hold at bay was that pesky Casey Stoner..

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simoncbr1000rr

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Apr 12

Posts: 558

best racer???

so your saying wosi that lorenzo for instance is a better racer than stoner??.....a racer is someone who wants to win and is prepared to bin it trying.....that is a racer,that is exciting.....not settling for 2nd 3rd 4th to get your name on a bit of tin!!!....does anybody give a shit that hayden took the title in 2006????.....as u can see i didn't put win as that was definately not how he did it....... would u rather win 9 races and bin it trying to win the othrrs or win 1 and come 2,3,4,5th in the others to take a hollow title knowing if you'd trued to xatchcasey to ein some races you'd have binned it trying????

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simoncbr1000rr

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Apr 12

Posts: 558

fukin mobile!!!!

fookin phone can't see what i'm fukin writing....cue sarcasm!!!

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buelligan272

Joined:

Jul 06

Posts: 1970

buelligan272 says:

SS

Lorenzo is a far more complete rider than Stoner.
Jorge is not only extremely fast but very efficient in all aspects of Moto GP.
Stoner had more weaknesses than Lorenzo especially in his mind.
Yes Stoner was more exciting to watch but I gurantee Lorenzo will win far more than Stoner ever has.Jorge has more fight in him than most riders on the grid.

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