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herbertmt

Joined:

Jan 13

Posts: 12

herbertmt says:

Second opinion

Hey guys,

I have a problem with a bike that I've owned for 5 weeks, I've done 400 miles on it.

Bought from a dealer, they found the following problems:

Front left disc collapsed, rear pads worn in the center of the pads (12 circle like dips or holes in the pad) and the brake pistons seized.

The dealer offers a 3 month warranty.

The dealer is blaming salt corrosion.. Do you think that the problems I've just mentioned could be caused by salt in that time frame?

Bike: 04 hayabusa.

A yes or no would be great!

Thanks very much for any help,

Anthony

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  • Posted 2 years ago (05 January 2013 18:26)

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steveb

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 809

steveb says:

The pitting in the pad

can be caused by the pad sticking to a very hot disc. A binding caliper will cause the disc to get hot, and won't release the pad from it. Salt corrosion will cause a piston or pad retaining pin to become sticky which will cause the caliper to bind. I've not known a caliper to bind to the point of the bobbins on a disc failing before though. 



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jonny68

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 768

jonny68 says:

what to do ?

I would ask the dealer to rectify the problems as the bike is not only unfit for purpose but more seriously is unsafe for the public highway.

I would state to the dealer that if they don't agree to repair the faults you will go straight to TRADING STANDARDS. This I am sure will send a shiver down their spines. If they still deny responsibility then go through with the threat. I would put money on it that they will back down when you mention trading standards.

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babyrocket

Joined:

Aug 11

Posts: 3732

babyrocket says:

not a chance

classic signs of piss poor maintenance, if the brakes were running as they should be when you bought the bike then 4 weeks even in arctic conditions would have a job doing the damage you describe, suzuki brakes are notorious for siezing if not looked after on a regular basis, sounds like a proper cowboy to me, stand your ground mate and use the trading standards as a weapon, no way on earth would i pay the robbing bastard a penny for any work other than a set of pads simply because the pads are a perishable item not covered by any warranty on even a new vehicle.

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jaffa90

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 8930

jaffa90 says:

Reply

NO,

this bike has not been serviced for a looooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong time.

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babyrocket

Joined:

Aug 11

Posts: 3732

babyrocket says:

jaffa

a very, very,very very very very very long time.

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jaffa90

Joined:

Mar 09

Posts: 8930

jaffa90 says:

AYE UP

Troubles back from Spain,

any Spanish jokes?

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herbertmt

Joined:

Jan 13

Posts: 12

herbertmt says:

Just annoying

So i'll give the dealer a call on Monday, I've emailed a few mechanics to get their second opinions and i quote 'unless you kept it in the sea there is no way'.


In their defense there was a lot of salty crud on the calipers but that's purely why i asked whether in 5 weeks and that mileage it could have caused the brake pistons to bind as bad as they have done. (causing the rest of the damage)

I guess what i'm trying to work out is whether their arguement is legitimate and it could possibly be 5 weeks of corrosion that would have caused this.

I'm aware that it can over a period of time so the timescale of this is the most critical point if i have to argue (which i obviously do).. :-(

Thanks for all the replies guys, all helps my corner.

I'm considering showing the dealer this forum post to make clear that his customer base would do the same given the evidence and see if that jolts him into doing this without charge.

Anthony

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BaldE35

Joined:

Oct 06

Posts: 1534

BaldE35 says:

Shark

Is the bike fit for purpose?

1. Dealer are obliged to supply a vehicle that is safe.

2. Brakes being a safety item should be up to the required standard

3. Email or write to the dealer spell out the issue provide photographs etc so he is perfectly clear that it is an issue he needs to addressed immediately. Specifically give him 7 days to rectify the fault. Clearly state that if he fails to do so you will take further action.

4. If you are a member of the RAC/AA or other such organisation get an engineers report. Or put the bike into your local Suzi dealer and get a full report of all the work they needed to do to put the fault right. Get them to rule out salt corrossion if you can. What might help is if you have only ridden a few miles since purchase ie how can it be salt if I have only ridden 10 miles in June?

5. Either instruct a lawyer/solicitor to act for you or do it yourself and recover the money via the small claims court. You will need to have formally informed the dealer or the action against him the court paper spell out what you need to do.

He is playing a game with you and if you act like a mug he will treat you like a mug the dealer is an obvious shark and you need to assert your rights. He is relying on you giving up on him and just riding away. The only way to sort the issue is to take strong action and that will cost you.

I have used this method a number of times and never had to go to court because each time the shop has bottled and sorted the issue out once they have received the court notification. But you must use the right method and follow the courts procedure exactly. Or chuck it at a solicitor and get them to do it.

So No is the answer.

Have fun and screw the bastard.

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herbertmt

Joined:

Jan 13

Posts: 12

herbertmt says:

Suzuki dealer

4. If you are a member of the RAC/AA or other such organisation get an engineers report. Or put the bike into your local Suzi dealer and get a full report of all the work they needed to do to put the fault right. Get them to rule out salt corrossion if you can. What might help is if you have only ridden a few miles since purchase ie how can it be salt if I have only ridden 10 miles in June?



Hahah, the funniest part is it is my local Suzuki dealer..
Hence why i emailed their head office. They also have the bike at the moment..

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domster

Joined:

Sep 12

Posts: 207

domster says:

Seized brakes

The brakes have been in that state for a long time and should never have passed an MOT. Threaten with Trading Standards & the MOT Inspectorate if they won't rectify at no cost to you.

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