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Reynard

Joined:

Oct 10

Posts: 169

Reynard says:

Schools,

why is that once again there are over 4000 schools closed.? Took a 3 mile drive through untreated narrow country roads covered in snow and ice into the local town, and guess what?, all the shops are open. So why not the schools? Do school staff reside in some parallel universe to the rest of us, or is just another excuse to have a 'jolly' at everyones expense?..

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  • Posted 2 years ago (21 January 2013 12:51)

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beaconsman

Joined:

Sep 09

Posts: 1780

beaconsman says:

teaching etc

my wife would beg to differ, she has just sorted out resources fro tomorrow, and she is in a meeting all day on a saturday for no extra pay, as she loves her job.  she was crying on the weekend worried about her yr 11's performances plus other crap.  So if i have a crap day looking after my children, normally i cope, but there are days when i truly want to jump on the zzr and thrash her..but we have different days and marriage is a partnership.  yes she does have 4 week off in the summer, she often goes in to sort out paperwork and classrooms.  anyway I've had kids all day, and trying to do a degree myself so when the children are in school, i can return to the workplace hopefully in engineering.  I was thinking of going into teaching after i graduated, after what i c mrs b do, ...im not so sure...


oh, mrs b just asked..Lunch breaks wtf are they?

break times..wtf are they as you have duties, bus duties or corridor duties..


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SlowLearner

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 1993

SlowLearner says:

Teacher holidays

Here's what it says on a teachers website:

-------------
These are the standard holidays…

  • Christmas: Two weeks
  • Easter: Two weeks
  • Summer: Five - Six weeks

In addition, there is a half-term holiday of one week in the middle of each term. 

-------------


That's a minimum of 12 weeks, plus public holidays, plus whatever personal days they can take.   Not bad work if you can get it - considering it's at least 3 times the holidays of everyone else.

Maybe teachers just reckon they need all that extra holiday, because they work so damned hard.   To hear them moan about how they put their lives on the line every day, one would swear they're the only ones who work at all.




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old(ish)git

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 9364

old(ish)git says:

slowlearner...

they've left Spring bank off....probably because they only get a week off....unless they can tack a couple of Teacher training days on of course.:smile

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SlowLearner

Joined:

Feb 10

Posts: 1993

SlowLearner says:

Oldish:

Too right!   Astonishing chutzpah from teachers complaining about pay, when they only work 2/3rds of the year at most.   With guaranteed pensions, secure jobs and decent conditions,  they must do all this moaning and whining to head off conversation about how easy they've got it.

*

Before a teacher starts foaming at the mouth at the idea that they've got it easy, consider there are a lot of workers who HAVE to do a 12 hour shift (plus handover) every day,  such as nurses, firemen, paramedics and so on, or people will start dying.   They've got to do it outdoors too - not just a few hours in a cosy classroom.  And there's no bleating about "couldn't make it in, bit of snow on the ground, didn't you hear?"

Do they close hospitals, power-stations, military bases, ambulance stations (even police stations!) etc. whenever there's a bit of snow?  Not on your life - and I do mean your life. 

I wonder if the massive blame culture in this country got put into people during their time as school, where they hear nothing but excuses and blame-laying from the whiny-arsed teachers who are supposed to be setting an example.

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Dumptruck

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 534

Dumptruck says:

ANichol

I was merely commenting on the lack of worth you place on your profession. To be honest you've shocked me with the lack of responsibility you take for the people you teach (I'm assuming that all teachers feel the same way as you and I'm sure that's not the case) boiled down your implied statement "Its not my fault, my students are stupid" is ridiculous.  How about, it is your fault, you have failed to inspire, motivate, and provide a good example. I recognize that educational failure is not just down to teachers, the parents obviously have a larger part to play, but if you stand up and say "I will teach your children" you are taking partial responsibility for how that child turns out and I would suggest that anyone that is not prepared to accept or is unaware of that responsibility shouldn't be teaching. THIS IS NOT A PERSONAL SLIGHT.

Back to the original point of the thread, does anyone know how many private schools were closed because of the snow?

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beaconsman

Joined:

Sep 09

Posts: 1780

beaconsman says:

schools

It is not the teachers that close the schools.  It is the principal or headmaster or in my wife's case, the chief executive.


another factor is if the bus companises refuse to collect them atnormal times so force the schools hands...

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ANichol

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 973

ANichol says:

Responses

Asking people to sign a waiver of responsibility for something a court may deem duty of care is not a strategy that works therefore heads cannot ask for parents to not sue if kids are "harmed" during snow days.

I place a lot of value on my job. What I complained about is the now automatic default in the education system in this country that every passing grade is a relfection of a dedicated student who has earned a valuable qualification, and every failure is an indication of failed teaching.

Teachers are supposed to educate and prepare children for future life. Because failure is now deemed the teachers fault, they are pressured into essentially rigging the results to avoid failure at all costs. Thus the kids can do bascially nothing, yet still achieve a passing grade. They are rewarded for doing no work. How, exactly, is that preparing them for life after school.

Working hours. I arrive at 8:30 (as a sixth form, we are somewhat later starting that the industry norm). I teach lessons continually until 16:30, and spend all of my lunch break doing student tracking data (everyday; praise be that I don't have to do playground duty or any of that). I then do an average of 2 hours marking/prep every evening. That's 10 hours a day for five days of the week. I also do examining work to keep in touch with developments and provide my students a better experience. I do this twice a year, but it works on average to being 3 hours for every weekend across the year. So, that's a 53 hour week, every week of term. That doens't include parents evenings, open evenings, or student disciplinary pannels we have to attend.

Then we get into non-term time. In non-term time, the work does not stop. An absence of lessons has little impact on the workload. Every lesson plan and resource must be reviewed, the department must prepare a self-review for Ofsted, student tracking data must be turned into performance information for governors and parents. References for University must be written (this year I had to do that for just under 100 students - all with a personally tailored reference).

Holidays are better than the private sector, I will acknowledge that; but not as good as the term vs non-term time would suggest. The trade-off is lower pay for the private sector equivalent.

Conditions:

Pension - guarenteed, yes; generous, no (not the "golden pensions" of the public sector, they're only for peole far higher than us)

Job for life? No, just been a round of redundencies because of a drop in the birth rate. Rural schools are closing and the students will be absorbed into local schools with no increase in staffing there.

Pay - starting salary for an "unqualified" police officer may have just been reduced, but even in its reduced form it is still more than that of a qualified teacher - a job that required a degree and postgraduate qualification and all the debt that now entails. Whilst teachers don't put their lives on the line, there are routine assaults and stabbings by kids and parents. It isn't as safe as working in a call centre (for instance).

No work no pay - applies to supply teachers (a growing portion of the sector).

Finally - Teachers don't close the schools; other people do. If your local supermarket was shut, you wouldn't blame the check-out staff

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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spondonste

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 2708

spondonste says:

Schools being shut so often now.

Why are so many schools shut when just about every other employment sector is still operating almost normally. If parents aren't letting kids go to school when its snowing/ icy then that's no different from taking them out of school for a holiday and the school is quick to fine parents for that.

 

It doesn't matter what sob story teachers try to portray, as soon as people look in to the full situation, teachers appear to get a substantially cushier number than those in other parts of the employment sector.

 

To then say any failure isn't their fault does seem to sidestep responsibility. Most schools are using more and more IT from training so why can't lessons be emailed out to students who can't attend in certain circumstances. the schools seem to want everything there way but to be able to blame everyone else.

Parents pay taxes for their children to be educated. The child will pay taxes throughout their life to pay for their education and also their children. the education system is often shirking on their responsibility and using HSE and sue culture to justify NOT DOING THIER JOB. this would not be tolerated in other employment sectors!

 

Regarding starting pay then lets look at that compared to say soldiers who risk their lifes (or even officers). The again lets not because it doesn't support your argument.

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beaconsman

Joined:

Sep 09

Posts: 1780

beaconsman says:

teaching etc

spondoste..


I was also a soldier..i was paid 24/7 365 days a year, and yes, i have been on duty over a xmas period and a new year..

Once i graduate i could either a.  go into the private sector with a fantastic salary from the off, leave at 5pm or whenever, and job stays at my workplace.
or b.  Train to a be a teacher, get observed teaching lessons not just by offsted but by senior management on regular occasions, to get judged on my teaching ability when the observers who are SMT cant even teach, offsted inspectors are failed teachers...

Ontop of that, you start off at £19k ish i think (I'll ask mrs b later after her meeting when i pick her up AT 7PM NOT 3PM! (she does not get paid overtime remember, as teachers have it cushy as we all know?!) 

2nd Feb she is an a meetign all day about progression
(she doesnt get paid as teachers have it easy dont they)..

I start my job at 7amish, finish at 7pm ish, then have tea, then study till 9/10pm most nights, ..(Stay at home dad to 2 under 2)..

My old salary wouldnt even cover the childcare so now i stay home.  Mr Cameron, you need to wake up and look at the real world..

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James600zx

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 2666

James600zx says:

Teachers.

I think many people's views on teaching are coloured by their own school days (-and a certain amount of vengeance perhaps?). Teaching probably was a comparatively cushy number then compared to now. It certainly seemed so for those teachers at my school who couldn't be bothered to make an effort. They wouldn't get away with that in today's education system.

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