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chipsnham

Joined:

Feb 13

Posts: 6

chipsnham says:

Cornering - thought process

hi guys,


I have no riding experience apart from my CBT, 1 x lesson and my mod1 and mod2 tests. Passed 1st time with 1 minor so chuffed with that, this was about 2 weeks ago and as soon as I passed I went out and bought a GSX-R600 (52) (I know it's not an ideal first bike and I should get more experience on something else first, but i'm not overly bothered by speed so just want to be controlled and smooth in corners).

I have ridden to work (20 ish miles away) pretty much every day for the 2 weeks since I passed my test and I wondered if someone with more experience could talk me through their thought process when approaching, during and exiting a corner.

e.g. do you lean in to the corner or do you lean forwards and in to the corner, where does your head go? what are you focusing on whilst in the corner? what are your hands doing? are you pushing down on the handlebars?

Really would appreciate some advice from someone more experienced.

Thanks!

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  • Posted 2 years ago (22 February 2013 19:32)

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Amateurcynic

Joined:

Jun 09

Posts: 1050

Amateurcynic says:

Firstly

Relax, if it feels comfortable there's a good chance it'll be safe(ish!). Most important is to look where you want to go, i.e. right through the corner to the next straight. This holds especially true when you think you've cocked it up, it doesn't matter how wrong you think you've got it, Look Through the Corner, Try your Very Damndest to make it. More often than not you'll make it (might have to change your underwear after though!:blink:). Remember; the biggest Limiting factor on a bike is... The Rider (unless your names Rossi, Stoner, Pedrosa etc!!:wink:)      

The amount of info you've asked for here would take weeks to type (even for a quick typist!) and reading about it doesn't always help improve your riding as putting it in to practice can be confusing. Get a little more familiar with your bike then get a couple of lessons with an advanced instructor (do a track day too, they usually have instructors on site & they're lots of Fun too! :biggrin:). A session with an instructor can also put a lot of the info you may have already read into context too.

Happy Riding out there:biggrin:

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preunit

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 11938

preunit says:

Gixxer 600

nice bike :smile


Regards cornering, make sure you've done your braking and you're in the correct gear before you enter the corner, your weight should be over the middle of the bike and maintained so throughout the corner.

As you approach a corner in this case say a right, position yourself slightly left of center of your lane, this will give you a better view of your exit and will help you as AC says "Look Through the Corner".

Also worth remembering the old adage " Slow in Fast out" .

I agree with AC, get some Advanced training, i'm sure with that and a bit more practice you'll soon be loving the twisties :smile

Ride safe

unit.

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philehidiot

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 4759

philehidiot says:

The

main problem here is making sure you're relaxed all the time as you're on a bike that will bite if you, for example hit a pothole whilst tense. Did that yesterday and the impact was so violent I luckily only let go of the throttle. If you're tense you could open it and oh dear.


Go out today and buy yourself a copy of motorcycle roadcraft. That or the IAM version. Read it and apply it. This will make you a much safer rider. I would also get some advanced training ASAP to ensure the holes in your skillset left by DSA training and examining which you have rightfully identified are plugged swiftly.

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zanderh

Joined:

Aug 12

Posts: 267

zanderh says:

Two things that helped me

were Motorcycle Roadcraft & a day out with an advanced instructor. Having read the book, when I went out with an advanced instructor I was able to actually put the teachings in the book into practice (or at least my interpretation of it) and then have the instructor help refine it.


But essentially the basics are (as the others have posted): look through the corner, keep the power on and steady so the weight is off the front wheel and keep to the outside of the turn until you can fully see your exit.
Keeping to the outside will give you the best and earliest view of your exit as possible and means you won't end up cutting the corner or running wide.

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Steveyman

Joined:

Jan 08

Posts: 616

Steveyman says:

Cornering Advice

If you have recently jumped onto a bigger bike and want to learn the art of cornering, DO have some advanced training with your local group. It doesn't cost anywhere near as much as the direct access if you go with Rospa or the IAM.

I used to be an observer for the IAM and the problem with advice on here it is open to mis-interpretation. No offence to those giving advice they are right what they are saying but it must be clearly understood what you are doing and why you are doing it.

For example staying to the outside of the bend does open up your view, but the golden rule is you must always sacrifice your position for safety.

So many riders get too close to oncoming vehicles when they negotiate bends because they stay on what they think is the correct line.

There are as said above a long list of things to think about when cornering, too many to right down. Its better to have someone show you how to tackle a particular bend, lots of times and then move onto another.

Road surface, camber, what speed, higher gear, lower gear, limit points, turning points, target fixation, slow in fast out, survival reactions, blah blah blah.

No offence to anyone, the advice is good but for a rider new to big bikes if you want to learn quickly and enjoy cornering, training is the way to go. Even track days are worth doing.

Hope this helps. 

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Steveyman

Joined:

Jan 08

Posts: 616

Steveyman says:

Cornering

Just thought, you might not feel ready for advanced training, the word advanced does put you off because it did for me.

In the meantime I can suggest the police roadcraft book, the safe system of riding. Or if you just want to focus on cornering I recommend Keith codes twist of the wrist book or video, this will tell you everything you need to know by one of the most successful race coaches and originator of the california superbike school.

Hope this helps.

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chipsnham

Joined:

Feb 13

Posts: 6

chipsnham says:

Thanks

Thanks everyone, some great advice there, the overwhelming response is to get some advanced instruction which I will look into.


The police have a Bike Safe event coming up locally so i'll head along to that too.

thanks again

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smidget

Joined:

Nov 07

Posts: 2424

smidget says:

I

don't do corners I have a V max.

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peterford

Joined:

Oct 12

Posts: 3

peterford says:

Cornering

Only one way you will improve wait for the better weather, get out there and practice. Don't try and imulate our track stars by thinking like one, find some where safe and quite, think about just a couple of things that have been said here and try it,no pressure remember slow in, stay on a little bit of throttle and pull yourself out of the bend looking well ahead of youself at all times., obviously the  faster you go the more lean angle you need, just relax and enjoy the best part of motorcycling , :smile don't forget cold tarmac and tyres are the quickest way to hospital.

 

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