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geoffart

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 1023

geoffart says:

GSX650f a pain to work on??

Hi there,

I just had a chain and sprocket kit fitted. the kit cost me 100 pounds, and the labour to fit it cost me about another 100 pounds. All the way through fitting the kit the mechanic was complaining about the non-standard design of my GSX650f and how he had to remove a lot of parts in order to get to the front sprocket. In the end the job came to over two hours long. 

Im no mechanic.  Does anyone with a GSX650f also have experience of this... and if so, why on Earth have Suzuki made this bike soooooo odddd and hard to work on?

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  • Posted 2 years ago (10 March 2013 01:04)

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Non-Standard design

what did he say was non-standard?

Not familiar with the GSXF (I were toying with buying one, and finally landed up with a Fazer), but I can't see why it should be overly difficult - it's based on the Bandit (the original budget bike) and I've never heard of any other complaints about these Suzuki's being difficult to work on. OK the GSXF is fully faired and the fairing will require removal - but the same can be said about any sportsbike inc the sister GSXR bikes. Some bikes have an opposite-thread sprocket nut, but a mechanic should be able to readily indentify that.

If I were you, I'd be rapidly investing in a Haynes manual and some spanners to be honest - that way you can get familiar with the bike (and you'll know when a workshop / mechanic is trying it on).

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geoffart

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 1023

geoffart says:

design

he said its apparently very different when you get down to the way things are put together, according to the mechanic. The front sprocket was not easily accessible, according to him. 

Yes, would be good to do work myself, but to be honest, I haven't  the time or the ability with mechanics.  I do want a fair deal though! 

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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KrismusSikpunz

Joined:

Mar 12

Posts: 1286

Your mechanic could be taking the P...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PsTUx_XZJlE



You need this man

Not gsx650f but typical Suzuki front sprocket removal

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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LEO61

Joined:

Aug 08

Posts: 584

LEO61 says:

Front sprocket

Hi Geoff, that mechanic is talking total Bo''@ks !! I used to own a K8 GSX 650F, I also had new chain and sprockets fitted, and only took half that time, including the mechanic taking it up the road for a test after fitting. If you look at the front of your chain, you will see it disappear behind a panel, which covers the front sprocket. Holding this panel is two, maybe three bolts with allen key heads, simply undo those bolts to expose the front sprocket........easy !!!! I put 32,000 miles on mine in 3 years, and used to remove this panel to access the front sprocket for regular cleaning and lubing, as part of my maintenance shedule for the chain. As mentioned already, get a haynes manual........well worth it. Good luck. :biggrin:

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geoffart

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 1023

geoffart says:

cheers

cheers for opinions and advice guys.  I do trust his technical ability, but I'm not made of money. 2 hrs does seem like a very long time to fit the chain and sprocket and 100 pounds is a lot of money. He kept pointing to it being a pain to work on though. Not many (if any) people online seem to agree though.

If he's a good mechanic pointing out a fact then I'm happy to go back, but if he's milking as much cash as he can out of a short'ish job, then I'll reluctantly have to call it a day.

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AdieR

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 3042

AdieR says:

Don't know

your locality; maybe someone will know a decent mechanic in your area if we know roughly where you are.

I personally tend to do most jobs myself (it allows you to get to know your bike as much as anything - but I have a good, straight-up mechanic round the corner if needs be, who doesn't charge the Earth.

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