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Anonymous

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MCN  says:

Video: BMW F800GT first ride

The new BMW F800GT aims to be a daily commuter, load-lugging tourer and weekend fun ride. The GT replaces the F800ST, which has been a decent seller in the middleweight touring bracket since 2006. The new bike has a new fairing, more power, changed riding position and updated parts to reposition it as a true touring machine rather than a faired version...

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  • Posted 2 years ago (15 March 2013 16:00)

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jon66

Joined:

Feb 09

Posts: 541

jon66 says:

nice

i love this bike , but no show at the scottish show , not good enough BMW

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exceledsteve

Joined:

Apr 10

Posts: 76

exceledsteve says:

Overlooked

I have the f800st tourer model currently and it's been a fantastic all-round bike. Commute, tour, rush about, it does it all with little compromise unless your fancy is only tickled by Mach speed. It's inexpensive to run, nicely finished with an overall quality feel, no noisy, messy chain to worry about and very practical to live with every day. With prices comparable to Japanese bikes of similar ilk I don't understand why we're not awash with these on the road. And this new one looks even nicer than the ST Model. Are we still obsessed with MPH and BHP? Do most of us still live in the primordial soup of testosterone, ball size boasting and willy measuring? This bike is sneered at by many. This is great news because it marks me as different from you, and that's one of the many things I love about bikes.

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steady2wheels

Joined:

Sep 08

Posts: 498

want one

fits the bill if you ride every day, not too big, upright, good protection, good mpg, fast enough for the road and i cannot understand why more middleweight bikes dont use belt drive

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puneetshriyan

Joined:

May 10

Posts: 5

boring

Hi guys, I have ridden one. Well not this latest model, but a 2009 model and while I am sure it is a very capable bike, I did find it really really boring. I agree with what everyone has said, it has a very good build quality, it looks alright and belt drive is brilliant as you don't have to worry about a messy chain. It is also very easy to live with as it is comfortable and can do more than just commuting.

But it really is boring, it has reached the refinement of hondas, that just go about doing their job, without the high end rush of the CBRs. When you twist the throttle, you hear a small whine and it gently pushes you forward. I have a car that does that just fine. I don't want to travel at 2 times the speed limit, but I want to have fun reaching the speed limit (isn't that the primary selling point of bikes "fun")

Anyway that is my 2 cents on F800, maybe the new model is completely different. But I'd ask for an extended test ride, before parting with my hard earned cash.

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Bradkap

Joined:

Mar 13

Posts: 1

Bradkap says:

2 Questions for MCN

If the rider of the F800GT is 5'8"-5'9" : 1. How well does the windscreen function ? Does the wind get directed into your chest, helmet, or up and over your helmet ? 2. I am coming off a BMW RT1200 R, how bent are the knees in the ride ? Should one consider lowering the pegs ?

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Boxer12

Joined:

Jan 13

Posts: 28

Boxer12 says:

PRICE!

What sells it for me is the fact it costs the same as Honda Deauville but is a lot more bike!!

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carloslavado

Joined:

Jan 11

Posts: 658

carloslavado says:

My pops has this the Triumph 800 and the new Duke Hyperstrada in his sights! Currently he rides a V-Strom Suzuki. Hoping he goes for the Ducati. The Hyperstrada looks pretty nimble and a down tuned L-twin is a sweet engine! After all i will ride it once in while.

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Rogerborg

Joined:

Sep 09

Posts: 898

Rogerborg says:

The BMW is more expensive with panniers

Then add in BMW servicing costs at a rather pathetic 6,000 mile interval, despite the belt drive. It'll be a risky prospect once it's out of warranty and the CANBUS gremlins come out to play. I'd expect to see a lot of typical BMW owners reviews of "Great bike, when it wasn't in the workshop..."

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Boxer12

Joined:

Jan 13

Posts: 28

Boxer12 says:

@rogborg

Don't believe everything you hear :) I'm on my second GSA and have had not problem, just had the 18k service for £120, you don't have to take it to BMW shop for service and Honda's service interval is 4k

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zoobaz

Joined:

Oct 10

Posts: 189

zoobaz says:

Belts...

Someone asked why more bikes don't use belts instead of chains.

Simple answer - fenner belts and pulleys really aren't suitable for motorcycle final drive systems because they rely on 2 main characteristics of the implementation - constant correct tension and a stableload. A motorcycle final drive system provdes neither of these. the loading is constantly varying due to road conditions and the tension cannot be constant due to the swingarm pivoting on a different axis from the drive pulley. Toothed belts & pulley systems are more suitable for conveyor or process handling systems in industry where the load is constant and the tension can be kept within tight tollerances. this also applies to kevlar belts as used in bike final drive systems.

The reason they are sometimes used in final drive systems is they do have the ability to isolate transmission noise and vibration which would otherwise be transmitted to the rider with a chain & sprocket arrangement. Ever noticed they're usually used in twin cylinder bikes (and some singles)? these engines tend to run less smoothly than a 4cyl therefore anything that can smooth things out helps.

So it's really a case of addressing a different set of design problems!

Ta,

Baz

 

 

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