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Anonymous

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MCN  says:

Video: Honda CRF250M first ride

Take the useful, liquid-cooled, four-stroke single out of the popular, learner friendly CBR250R and create a proper trailie around it (the CRF250L). Then let's go one step further and make a supermoto out of it - the result is this, the Honda CRF250M! brightcove.createExperiences();

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  • Posted 2 years ago (17 May 2013 14:19)

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preunit

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 11886

preunit says:

I liked the drumming bit :)........that was exciting.

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davdamos

Joined:

Feb 08

Posts: 159

davdamos says:

it'd be great with 47bhp

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TinkerNZ

Joined:

Oct 09

Posts: 196

TinkerNZ says:

yeah, the drumming was better than average.....

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Abstract rude

Joined:

Aug 08

Posts: 62

I'd buy it

You say you're not sure who'll buy it, people like me, I'm 21 and have held a licence since I was 18, I can't afford to learn to drive a car, or buy one, or tax one, or insure one. I currently ride a cbr600 2000 model and I barley get the use out of it for what it costs. I work in a bike shop and it seems I'm not the only one, a mixture of government alterations to the licencing laws means that there is no point in 17 year olds doing a test anymore and they will probably get a car and forget biking. The other culprit is insurance companies pricing the young out of motoring by being greedy and charging extortionate rates. I have 3 years no claims, I've never had an accident and I have never paid less than 800 quid a year fully comp. Adventure bikes are huge and they started as a niche just like supermoto has, as long as it can lift the front wheel this bike could be very desirable, I can see Honda selling loads, and one will be in my garage, no doubt with an insurance policy on it equal to half the value of the bike, robbing bastards.

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romford4

Joined:

Oct 05

Posts: 133

romford4 says:

I'm struggling to

see the point of it.  I'm a big fan of Hondas and reckon their current range is the best of all manufacturers out there at present, but I just can't see where this fits.  Honda sold their FMX650 supermoto up until 2009 which was very similar.  £4,000 (but discounted in some dealers to £3500), it suited the  A2 licence requirements, and although it wasn't a powerful bike in any way, its lazy 650 engine suited this style of bike far better than this weedy sounding 250.  I know the CRF250L is doing well, but it's a lightweight trailie.  This bike is a road machine and needs a bigger engine to appeal to anyone.  Even putting in a 400cc motor would retain the light-weight, the economy, still be £37 a year to tax, and would likely meet the A2 licence requirements.  It would also make it more competitive with the Duke 390.

'Abstract rude', I've run off insurance quotes for relatively modest supermotos, and  the insurance is surprisingly pricey.  I find that quotes for even 125cc Chinese supermotos are expensive as I could insure bikes like the SV650 for similar money.

Nah, I can't see this bike taking off, particularly when Lexeter are bringing out their Pulse Adrenaline 250 anytime now.  Just look at the motorcycle industry's own figures for new sales over the last few years.  Lexeter brands like Lexmoto and Pulse are seeing sales take off and are gaining decent market share, whilst many other mainstream manufacturers are struggling.  Estimated to cost around £1,999, the Adrenaline is where I'd put my money if I was a younger rider after a 250.  I regularly see guys on Chinese 125s commuting in to work and have spoken with them about how they find their bikes.  I don't believe that the CRF250M is more than twice as good a bike as the Adrenaline 250 will be as suggested by its price tag.

 

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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Abstract rude

Joined:

Aug 08

Posts: 62

llexmoto

Chinese bikes are shocking. 60mph 250 most. Poor quality, poor spares back up, ruthless warranty. No such thing as goodwill. Trust me, I work in a bike shop and deal with this shit everyday. Also the fmx650 was slower than the old dominator it took the engine from.

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romford4

Joined:

Oct 05

Posts: 133

romford4 says:

"Trust me, I work in a bike shop"

No offence Abstract, as I'm sure you're one of the good guys, but in general the staff in bike shops are the people I trust the least.  Had too many bad experiences... one of which funnily enough was a salesman in a Honda main dealer insisting that the FMX650 I was looking at was a twin-pot.  Other lies from sales staff to procure sales, lies from workshop staff over what's been done, sub-standard workmanship, bikes returned with dangerous faults, me taking a dealer to court, the list goes on. 

Nope, for the past 4 years I've done an annual trip to France and get my bike serviced there.  Cheaper, more reliable, more trustworthy - bikes are bigger in most countries south of the uk, and the dealers seem to have a better idea when it comes to standards and customer service.  In this country, I like my bikes nice and simple now - something that a novice spannerman like me can work on with a few tools, a workshop manual, and a methodical approach, and single cylinder supermotos and trailie style bikes fit the bill. 

Lexeter brands Lexmoto and Pulse aren't without the odd problem as with most Chinese bikes, but they are generally reliable as they use tried and tested older technology.  Parts warranty is provided and most half decent dealers will throw in labour as well unless you pare them to the bone price-wise when you buy new.  Parts are no issue - MCN tested this in an issue quite a while back and the Chinese parts often arrived as quick if not quicker than the parts from UK main dealers of Jap bikes.  And for any 'mechanic' out there who is still refusing to work on Chinese bikes... you're not worth a f*** as a mechanic if you can't work on some of the simplest tech bikes in existence! 

Like I said, I see guys commuting daily in to the bike bays next to my work, quite a few riding Chinese tackle.  They're perfectly happy with their bikes as they do the intended job.  I often wonder if much of the negativity surrounding Chinese bikes is borne out of ignorance or whether it's owners of some small capacity Jap bikes who feel the need to run down Chinese bikes to justify the extra cost of their own.  Look at the MCIA figures for new bike registrations - other than the spike in sales in March/April of mainstream brands when people traditionally buy brand new 'big' bikes, Lexeter brands Lexmoto and Pulse taken together consistently outsell everyone with the exception of Honda and Yamaha.  They smash Kawasaki and Suzuki. 

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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sj_edinburgh

Joined:

Apr 04

Posts: 89

sj_edinburgh says:

I used to own an FMX650, good enough bike but I think this bike is a better bet. Okay it's down on power but: it's lighter, is two tax brackets lower (the FMX cost the same to tax as a 1000!), the FMX used to eat tyres for breakfast, cheaper parts, cheaper to insure and about half the fuel consumption (not an exaggeration).

I had a testride of the CFR250L and my conclusion was - fun bike but I hate the tyres, hard seat and the suspension isn't ideal for road use. I guess the hard seat remains but this bike sounds like a winner to me, maybe not in the UK but elsewhere. A decent sized, cheap to run road bike from a reputable manufacturer, with the bonus of great fuel consumption (this engine will do ovr 80mpg easily).

I'd consider one but I only bought a bike last year to can't justify it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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romford4

Joined:

Oct 05

Posts: 133

romford4 says:

Si

Easily over 80mpg is good, but then not that great when bikes like the KTM Duke 690 and the BMW G650GS were tested by Ride mag and delivered mpg in the high 70's.

Different bikes and prices, but Honda could have put a 400c in it to still keep the tax at £37 p/year and I can't believe a 400cc lump would cost any more to manufacture than the current 250.  Then it would be the spiritual successor to the DRZ400SM and I'd be at the front of the queue to slap my deposit down.

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