Canard cranks up the pressure in Texas

By Paul Harris -

Off road

 03 April 2011 22:41

The merry-go-round of the 2011 Supercross series continued in Texas on Saturday.

Mike Alessi was quickest out of the gate, but Trey Canard was on hand and straight through into the lead – Ryan Dungey tried to follow Canard through but tangled with Alessi, allowing Chad Reed to pass both of them, and then James Stewart came past the lot of them.

Speedy Reedy fought back and made his way back into second a handful of laps in as Ryans Dungey and Villopoto held a watching brief in fourth and fifth.

The five major players in the craziest season ever were all at the sharp end. Stewart stalked Reed until the halfway point, slowly sneaking up on the Aussie before making a move through the whoops.

Unfortunately, not for the first time in his career, the mercurial Stewart lost control and careered into Reed, putting them both on the ground – Stewart would remount his smokey Yamaha in fourth, whilst Reed, knocked clean off the track, remounted just inside the top ten but sensibly pitted to get his battle-scarred Honda checked for damage.

With the Ryans promoted to second and third, Villopoto quietly snuck his way by Dungey to take second as Canard circulated serenely in the lead, bringing it home for his second straight win to yet again close up the title race.

Stewart took fourth ahead of Kevin Windham whilst Reed came home eighth, the results of which promoted Villopoto back to the head of the championship, six points ahead of Reed.

Dungey is a point further back in third, whilst Canard is getting right into the hunt, nine points off Dungey and five points ahead of Stewart. The 250F race was class.

Series leader Justin Barcia took the holeshot, but Ryan Sipes was a man on a mission, charging past Barcia for the lead and showing every sign of checking out before a mistake allowed Barcia back on his tail.

Handed such a golden opportunity on a plate, Barcia executed what might, in some circles, be considered a slightly rude pass, barging his way through into the lead – a rattled Sipes would crash soon afterwards.

Instead it was left to Dean Wilson to carry the fight, charging from way back to run Barcia down before the pair of them engaged in an increasingly lively duel for the win.

Wilson finally pulled off a great pass with a handful of laps left and although Barcia made strenuous efforts to get back on terms, Wilson held off the feisty pass attempts to hang on for the win, reducing his championship deficit to thirteen points.