MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675 (2012-on) Review

Published: 13 July 2012

"Finally an MV you can afford and want"

MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)

"Finally an MV you can afford and want"

Overall Rating 4 out of 5

MV Agusta used to be the dream, aspirational brand; the poster bike we proudly hung on our garage and shed wall; the Ferrari of the biking world – and just as expensive, impractical and out of reach. But with the all new MV Brutale 675 that could all be set to change. At £8299 it’s not only cheaper, astonishingly, than the Japanese competition, it’s finally an MV you can afford and want.

Ride Quality & Brakes 4 out of 5

The Brutale is light and flickable enough to dart around traffic and in the normal riding mode the power is softened making it even easier. Its turning circle isn’t bad considering its sporting DNA, the mirrors are fine and the dash is really useful. Ground clearance is excellent despite the low seat and feel from the standard suspension is more than adequate. It’s on the firm side out of the box, which does compromise hitting cobbled streets with speed but should work on track. You don’t have to be an expert to get the most out of the Brutale on road or track, historically with MV that was never the case.  And thanks to its more friendly ergonomics you wouldn’t be in agony on the ride home, but you may need a cushion for the hard seat.

Engine 4 out of 5

The engine is almost as powerful as the engine in the F3 supersport bike, but makes more torque lower down the rev range, making it more useable on the road and great fun. The little three-cylinder motor also loves revs and will happily scream along and over rev. MV has listened to criticism and worked hard to improve throttle response from the first F3. It’s much friendlier and not as snatchy as before.

Build Quality & Reliability 4 out of 5

There’s no question it’s beautifully-built and well-finished, but it’s too early to say if it will be as bulletproof as the competition. Many current MV owners complain of spare parts supply, but a UK spokesman for MV says parts availablity has improved with the addition of a new distribution partner in Italy.

Insurance, running costs & value 5 out of 5

The MV is over £1000 cheaper than a Yamaha R6 or Honda CBR600, and is not that far behind the CBR in terms of outright power and torque, but that doesn't mean they've skimped on the quality. It's the most high tech middleweight naked, with switchable engine maps, traction control and radial Brembo brakes.

Insurance group: 16 of 17 – compare motorcycle insurance quotes now.

Equipment 5 out of 5

The Brutale uses the same changeable engine mappings and traction control as the F3. The eight stage traction control can be changed on the move, from the mode switch on the left bar. There are also four modes to choose from (switchable from the starter button): each has a different level of throttle response, torque, rev limit, and engine braking characteristics. Rain mode restricts the power to 80%, which means around 85bhp, and also softens the power delivery. It also automatically switches the traction control back on if you’ve turned it off. Normal mode again softens the power, making it less aggressive but unlike rain mode you can have full power and revs at the top end. Sport mode is more aggressive: the torque is more instant but it’s not unrideable like the previous, first F3. There’s also a custom mode, which lets you customsie everything from power to engine braking. You can easily switch between modes on the move using the starter button the right bar

Owners' Reviews

1 owner has reviewed their MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675 (2012-on) and rated it in a number of areas. Read what they have to say and what they like and dislike about the bike below.

Review your MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675 (2012-on)
Summary of Owners' Reviews
Overall Rating 4 out of 5
Ride Quality & Brakes 4 out of 5
Engine 5 out of 5
Build Quality & Reliability 4 out of 5
Value & Running Costs 4 out of 5
Equipment 5 out of 5
4 out of 5

MV Agusta Brutale 675 Review (Indonesia)

04 January 2016 by Glen Suhardi

Overall, MV's entry level Brutale performs better than one would expect. In terms of looks the bike lives true to it's moniker: Motorcyle art. The engine is top notch and produces an intoxicating roar. The 675 rides and stops like a dream. Stock... Read more equipment is plentiful, however several upgrades are recomended. Regardless of it's few short comings, Varese's finest live up to their legend once again.

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
The bike is very nimble and responsive in terms of steering. The 675 is not equipped with adjustable forks, however this feature may not be necessary as the stock forks perform well. It feels uncomfortable when navigating over bumps and potholes, but that is expected from a sport standard. Brakes are from Brembo and perform great. It would be unnecessary to upgrade unless one is planning to race. The levers have a slightly spongy feel, but aftermarket ones are available to remedy this.
Engine
5 out of 5
The Brutale's engine is arguably the highlight of the bike. It revs rather high (up to 15k rpm) for a naked, from being based of the F3. The good side of this is that you will hear the intoxicating roar of the "trepistoni" quite often. The engine makes around 108-110HP (mine makes more from the exhaust I installed) and around 69 Nm worth of torque. Power is delivered gently from 0 to 9k RPMs, from 10k on everything goes mad! However, it is still commuter friendly.
Build Quality & Reliability
4 out of 5
The Brutale 675's build quality is top notch,as you would expect from a brand that proudly claims "Motorcyle Art". After riding for almost a year in both wet and dry conditions rust is non existent and I've only had one breakdown due to human error on the mechanic's part. For some reason I keep getting quite a number of false neutrals when shifting from first to second, but the problem maybe unique to my bike as my friends who also own the same model say otherwise.
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
The running costs of the Brutale would be higher than average,however I am unable to comment more as mine is still under warranty. It gets around 30-40 km/litre which is good for an Italian. But when you own a Brutale, fuel economy is not a concern.
Equipment
5 out of 5
The Brutale is equipped with an array of electronic rider aids which include ABS, TC, and riding modes. The riding modes are Sport, Normal, Rain, and Custom. Sport mode is best reserved for fast roads and the track as the throttle response is aggressive and TC and ABS is minimal. Normal mode is the "all rounder" which still allows maximum power but a milder throttle response. I commute with the Normal setting unless it rains. Rain mode creates a big difference, since TC is maxed and the engine's HP is restricted to around 75HP. This inspires confidence for riding in the rain, however over all the bike feels restricted and seems to heat up faster. Custom mode for me is set to sit somewhere between Rain and Normal mode for when I was still getting used to the bike. A recommended upgrade would most definitely be a tail tidy , aftermarket clutch levers and aftermarket exhaust. The tail tidy makes an already sexy bike even sexier, although it will get you and everyone around you wet in the rain. There are two choices for the after market exhaust: multiple exit (2 and 3) and single exit. Multiple exit produces a rough,throatier growl, while a single exit produces a smoother, roar reminiscent of a GP bike. The aftermarket levers are a must if one plans on commuting, as the stock ones are ridiculously hard and offer no room for adjustment.
Buying experience

*Note this is specific to the Indonesia dealership Mine was bought used from the dealer with a mere 186 Kms on the clock. The dealer experience was positive as the staff were friendly as well as helpful and the premises was comfortable. I feel that the owner goes the extra mile to ensure every MV owner is satisfied with their bike. One thing to note is the way the dealer seems to try and sell the "exclusivity" side more than the preformance side. The dealership holds trackdays once every few months as well as a gathering for the MV owners club once a year.

Read all 1 owners' reviews in full

Facts & Figures

Model info
Year introduced 2012
Year discontinued -
New price £8,299
Used price £5,500 to £8,500
Warranty term Two year unlimited mileage
Running costs
Insurance group 16 of 17
Annual road tax £82
Annual service cost -
Performance
Max power 108 bhp
Max torque 48 ft-lb
Top speed 140 mph
1/4-mile acceleration -
Average fuel consumption 39 mpg
Tank range 150 miles
Specification
Engine size 675cc
Engine type Liquid-cooled, DOHC, four valve, four-stroke triple
Frame type Tubular steel trellis
Fuel capacity 17.5 litres
Seat height 810mm
Bike weight 167kg
Front suspension Marzocchi 43mm inverted front forks. Non adjustable.
Rear suspension Sachs single rear shock with preload adjust
Front brake 320mm discs with Brembo four piston, radially mounted calipers.
Rear brake 220mm disc with Brembo twin piston caliper
Front tyre size 120/70-ZR17
Rear tyre size 180/55-ZR17

History & Versions

Model history

2012: model introduced

Other versions

None

Photo Gallery

  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
  • MV-AGUSTA BRUTALE 675  (2012-on)
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