TRIUMPH TIGER 800 (2010-2014) Review

Published: 22 November 2010

A great bike with excellent ergonomics and a superbly linear and progressive power delivery

TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)

A great bike with excellent ergonomics and a superbly linear and progressive power delivery

Overall Rating 4 out of 5

Triumph’s Tiger 800 is the slightly more basic, more road-orientated and novice-friendly (not to mention cheaper) version of its three cylinder dual-purpose machines.

The other is the Tiger 800XC. It’s a great bike, too –  impressing immediately with excellent ergonomics, and a superbly linear and progressive power delivery.

Ride Quality & Brakes 4 out of 5

Handling is always a priority with Triumph and on this evidence they’ve succeeded again. The road, 19inch-wheeled, lower, lighter 800, is inevitably the sharper, slightly easier of the two Tigers through the twisties – but not by much.

What’s most impressive is the handling quality given pretty basic components. Their set-up is such that, overall, on road, both are more than capable of mixing it with sports bikes and are a real blast to ride, while at the same time being decently stable, comfortable long distance machines, although we prefer the higher stature and more substantial size of the XC.

Engine 5 out of 5

Triumph’s middleweight triple was already a gem, both in 675 and Street Triple guise. But with the stroke lengthened to take it up to 799cc, primarily to fatten-up the low and middle stretches of the 10,000rpm rev band albeit at the expense of some top end, turns the Tiger 800’s powerplant into an easy, seamless, idiot-proof jewel.

And that, combined with the light clutch, perfectly slick gearbox and impeccable throttle response, makes the Tiger 800 a doddle to ride

Build Quality & Reliability 4 out of 5

Neat touches abound, such as a little switch to lower the headlamp for pillion use, the clever seat height adjusters, plenty of bungee hook points and decent underseat storage.
The quality seems good, especially with the clocks, paint etc and, with a claimed 250-mile potential range and raft of accessories is immensely versatile.

Insurance, running costs & value 4 out of 5

You pays your money, you takes your choice… the base version of the two Tigers ticks virtually every box and is probably, unless you specifically NEED some off-road ability, the more logical choice, but both are decent value.

Equipment 4 out of 5

As the more entry-level, cheaper, road-biased option, the Triumph Tiger 800 is visually differentiated from the XC by its cast wheels (19-inch at the front in place of the XC’s 21), lack of ‘beak’ and less sophisticated, shorter travel suspension (although, just to confuse things, XC items like the beak and handguards can be fitted to the 800, too).

Owners' Reviews

10 owners have reviewed their TRIUMPH TIGER 800 (2010-2014) and rated it in a number of areas. Read what they have to say and what they like and dislike about the bike below.

Review your TRIUMPH TIGER 800 (2010-2014)
Summary of Owners' Reviews
Overall Rating 4.2 out of 5
Ride Quality & Brakes 4.1 out of 5
Engine 4.6 out of 5
Build Quality & Reliability 4.7 out of 5
Value & Running Costs 4.6 out of 5
Equipment 4.2 out of 5
4 out of 5

Tiger 800 2011

04 June 2016 by Apw

Non-adjustable suspension and gear ratios too close let the bike down Read more

Ride Quality & Brakes
3 out of 5
Cheap suspension and brake components make it competent but make it a good bike, not a great bike.
Engine
4 out of 5
Gear ratios too close. Emmeline is really sweet and smooth
Build Quality & Reliability
4 out of 5
Cheap suspension is a shame. Powder coated frame is lovely. Bullet proof and economical. Low insurance and easy to ride.
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
Great on fuel.
Equipment
4 out of 5
Basic but fine for an adventure bike. Lots of accessories available.
5 out of 5

5 years on

16 February 2016 by KildareMan

After 5 years it still puts a huge smile on my face. Can't think of a bad feature. Recommended. Read more

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
Great all round bike. Suspension not the greatest but works well enough.
Engine
5 out of 5
Stonking flat torque delivery. Embarrasses many a sports bike.
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
Stone chips on the frame. Only failed once and even then not a problem continuing with the journey home - gear lever shaft failure.
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
Do most servicing myself
Equipment
4 out of 5
Not as many "toys" as the newest model but has as standard a very comprehensive instrument display.
Buying experience

Bought new in Dublin. Park exchanged my Tiger 1050.

4 out of 5

Great all rounder

22 January 2016 by DavidJ

Best features... smooth and torquey engine which pulls smoothly from low revs and sounds good, comfortable seat and riding position, good gearbox, competent suspension, nimble handling, great all rounder, very easy to ride under all... Read more conditions. Could benefit from more top end power, a little twitchy at high speed, throttle a little jerky. and a terrible windshield, both stock and higher version from Triumph. lots of buffeting and wind noise. Replaced with 18 inch Madstad - now calm and quiet.

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
Good all rounder. surprisingly good suspension from Showa, for a base unadjustable set up..smooth and resilient. Seat is very comfortable, well padded. Brakes are fine - predictable and solid. NO problen riding 200 ks without a break
Engine
4 out of 5
Love the smooth, wide powerband. It's a delight to ride, the best in the business. Can pull away at very low revs, and cruise around in a high gear with no lugging, then accelerate right up the rev range. Have not experienced any heat problems, even on a hot summer day..much cooler than my former Sprint. Could use more high end power...noticeably slower at high speeds than my Triumph Sprint 955..but more user friendly at everyday speeds, so it's a bit of a tradeoff.
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
Only 7,000 kilometers, but everything looks good..high quality on paint and trim, no reliability issues.
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
-
Equipment
5 out of 5
Practical. tiedowns, luggage rack. clearly designed by people who use their bikes for more than short runs. Triumph windshields, both standard and higher versions, did not work at all for me. worst buffeting and wind noise I've experienced. much better with no screen at all, so wind flow could be clean. Installed a Madstad which solved the problem with its design allowing air to enter under windshield and reduce low air pressure, there should be one like this standard.
4 out of 5

18 December 2015 by Mike

I've ridden this bike for 40K miles, covering much of the US including Alaska, and large parts western Canada. I've never had a breakdown. The bike is agile in mountains and decent on gravel and dry dirt roads. It's light enough to pick up. Power... Read more is more than adequate for me, my camping gear, racks and panniers which together weigh about 170kg. Chains and sprockets need renewal at about 15K miles, tyres at 6K and full synthetic oil isn't cheap. I get around 42 mpg. A Madstad screen was a must, and Happy Trail panniers have kept all equipment dry. It now has a Sargent seat.

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
Brakes are fine. ABS helps during a panic on dry pavement.
Engine
5 out of 5
Great, smooth running engine. Very even power delivery. Vibration is nearly absent, and wrists, hands or feet do not become numb.
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
At first, the bike did not idle. A local dealer replaced a part, the problem went away and never returned.
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
Valve clearance check and adjustment is about $700 US dollars - ouch! Several of my valves were out of spec at 28K miles.
Equipment
4 out of 5
Seat and standard windscreen must be replaced. This, like many other bikes, should be sold sans seat and windscreen at a reduced price.
5 out of 5

Tiger 800 1 year (almost) on

23 November 2015 by EddT

I've owned close to forty bikes of all shapes, styles and sizes. This is comfortable for two up, one up, twisties, bumpies, straights everything. Yes other bikes do some bits better but this does evryhting you can ask of it. It says a lot that I've... Read more averaged 2000 miles a year for the past ten years but covered 7500 in less than 9 months on the tiger.

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
I use the bike every day for commuting, every weekend for a ride out and have done three week long tours this year, I can't stay off it. I've done a couple of 10 hour days up to Scotland and comfort has been absolutely fine although I have heard others complain that it's uncomfortable. Guess it depends on the shape of your sit bones. I've had a couple of 'moments' on loose gravel and manhole covers but the bike has twitched, settled and carried on before I've had chance to panic.
Engine
5 out of 5
All the torque you need, all the power you need on the road. It returns mid 50's mpg on a motorway run and mid 40's if I push on on the bends. Only minor issue was that it is a little high revving for chugging along off road but then it was never genuinely designed for this.
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
Only issue I've ever had was a dodgy throttle position sensor, it didn't leave me at the side of the road but started cutting out at throttle roll off. All fixed under warranty and not a problem since.
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
Triumph servicing isn't the cheapest with £250 6000 mile service and the 12000 mile expected to cost £500. It's not so over the top and it all gets done correctly. I've had other brands from other dealers where the service checklist was ticked off but not necessarily done.
Equipment
5 out of 5
Tyres: The Pirelli Scorpions it came with lased 5000 miles, I was hoping for more and they were ok tyres. I replaced these with Pilot Road 4's which are exceptional and the only thing that slows me down in the wet is lack of visibility. Pads: changed at 5000 miles in preparation for a week long tour of Scotland. Could have squeezed a bit more out of them but I think commuting takes its toll on the pads. Chain: fitted a scottolier when new and I've adjusted it once (and once again at 6k service I guess). Loads of life left in it. Accessories: Heated grips, engine bars, higher screen, hand guards, They all contribute their own little bit but I wouldn't go mad for any of them. Probably the most useful (but boring) accessory is the centre stand. Maybe I'm just too old skool but I like to have a centre stand, it just makes it so much easier to check chains, remove wheels for tyre changes, brake pads etc.
Buying experience

Bought from a dealer as the last of the 800 ABS before the new new ones came out. Got £2500 off list and £1000 of Triumph accessories thrown in. Just couldn't resist the deal.

4 out of 5

Step up

25 August 2014 by Anonymous

The Tiger 800 I don't own any more, I traded in on a Triumph tiger sport, before thr 800 I had a Triumph tiger 955i. The 800 is a great bike for those riders that haven't been in the saddle to long, say stepping up from a 250 or something like... Read more that. It makes a great bike for females or shorter male riders, postives for this category of rider are Post 1. Low seat ( 810mm lowest setting) this is without any lowering of suspension either. 2. Gear incataor 3. Low oil window 4. Very smooth tripple engine ( with very easy manageable power) 5. Not to heavy Negatives 1. Handling on the twistes is ok ( not brilliant) 2. Not very exciting to ride 3. No adjustment in front forks Other than that its a great all round motorcycle, that can be used as an all day commuter, weekend rider , long distance touring ( only one up ) , bike has a great range of accessories, couldn't recommend to less experienced and female riders enough.

Ride Quality & Brakes
3 out of 5
-
Engine
4 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
4 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
-
Equipment
4 out of 5
-
3 out of 5

The screen - a nightmare

17 May 2012 by fredwinter

Hired one while in Australia and did a 1500 kms tour with my son-in-law and friends. We were 6 bikes in all. The Tiger is a doddle to ride and handles beautifully. Gear change is slick and controls work well. Seat height fine. But the screen! ... Read more Totally ruined my ride. Unless you can find an aftermarket screen that works, think again before buying. Oh, someone else who rode the bike complained that in traffic there was too much heat around his legs.

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
-
Engine
4 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
4 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
4 out of 5
-
Equipment
3 out of 5
-
5 out of 5

had to have one

18 August 2011 by shorne

Saw it in MCN bike test and went for a test ride.Pulls like a twin revs like a four and handles beautifully. Added a 'beak' etc so now its like the XC. I am so enjoying this bike and its British! Read more

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
-
Equipment
4 out of 5
-
4 out of 5

Nice bike, shame about the screen

09 August 2011 by malj90

Engine, clutch & gearbox are a delight. Handles superb, corners well, bit hard on front end over bumpy roads. only real gripe is the screen, even with the adjusters fitted, it was unbearable at speed. Removed it completely, a lot better. Read more

Ride Quality & Brakes
4 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
-
Equipment
5 out of 5
-
4 out of 5

Luvvly Jubbly

18 June 2011 by Goulash

Day i bought this, went for an 800 mile trip abroad. Rained all the way and you have to like a bike after that as it never missed a beat. Headlights finally sorted, harsh suspension to start with until i discovered you could adjust it, two clicks off... Read more standard and fine for me. Fuel consumption was great on the trip, over 200 miles to a tank so no complaints there. Handling excellent, engine superb, a great touring machine if you ask me. On a side note to Triumph, can you do something with the screen please? While you're looking at updates, a longer chain guard wouldn't go amiss.

Ride Quality & Brakes
5 out of 5
-
Engine
5 out of 5
-
Build Quality & Reliability
5 out of 5
-
Value & Running Costs
5 out of 5
-
Equipment
4 out of 5
-
Read all 10 owners' reviews in full

Facts & Figures

Model info
Year introduced 2010
Year discontinued 2014
Original price £8,600
Used price £5,000 to £7,800
Warranty term (when new) Two year unlimited mileage
Running costs
Insurance group -
Annual road tax £82
Annual service cost £180
Performance
Max power 94 bhp
Max torque 58 ft-lb
Top speed 130 mph
1/4-mile acceleration -
Average fuel consumption 40 mpg
Tank range 169 miles
Specification
Engine size 799cc
Engine type 12v triple, 6 gears
Frame type Twin steel tube
Fuel capacity 19 litres
Seat height 810mm
Bike weight 210kg
Front suspension 43mm inverted forks, no adjust
Rear suspension Monoshock, preload adjust
Front brake 2 x 308mm discs, twin piston calipers
Rear brake 255mm disc
Front tyre size 110/80 x 19
Rear tyre size 150/70 x 17

History & Versions

Model history

2010: Model introduced

Other versions

Triumph Tiger 800XC - off-road model with 21 inch front wheel.

Photo Gallery

  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
  • TRIUMPH TIGER 800  (2010-2014)
All related reviews
All related bikes for sale