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Honda NC700X Adventure Motorbike Review

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MCN overall verdict rating is 4

The idea of a cheap, capable bike that offers more in terms of style and versatility than a basic commuter is a good one. Being able to stash a helmet turns 'good' into practical brilliance. Affordability and ease of use is what the NC700X is all about with bags of comfort, stability, an agile chassis and a simple engine with an 8000-mile service schedule. This is probably the easiest motorcycle available today to get on and just ride.

Engine

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 4

As motorcycle engines go it's not an exciting one. It does the job it's meant to do perfectly and offers a terrific amount of grunt between 1000 and 4000rpm, which makes commuting and motorway cruising a breeze. It's likable from the off because of the way it pulls cleanly and strongly thanks largely to its long stroke. More experienced riders WILL hit the rev limiter several times until they get used to it, but think of it as a diesel car and you'll soon settle into a more relaxed style of riding. The DCT in fully automatic mode stops this.

Ride and Handling

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 4

As with the engine, the handling feels effortless. The engine is carried low in the frame and there's an empty space for yor helmet/shopping where the tank should be, giving the bike a low centre of gravity. Suspension is budget but the forks are damped strongly enough to give feel and hold the bike under heavy braking. Honda makes a big deal about the NC's slim build and how it aids city riding and, yes, it helps make it easy to throw around, so much so that the daunting wet weight of 218kg doesn't come into it.

Equipment

MCN rating rating is 5
Owners' rating rating is 4

For £5850 you get a lot of bang for your buck. Honda's brilliant Combined Anti-Lock braking system (C-ABS) comes as standard. The screen, although small, offers plenty of protection from the elements and makes 80mph+ cruising a doddle. Perhaps the best part is the storage space, where the tank would be on conventional bikes. The 'boot' can easily hold a full face helmt and makes quick trips to the supermarket a doddle.

Honda NC700X (2012-2013)

Detail Value
New price £5,999
Dealer used prices
£4,560 (2012) - £5,930 (2014)
Private used prices
£4,210 (2012) - £5,340 (2014)
  View full used price info
Engine size 670 cc
Power 51 bhp
Top speed 115 mph
  MCN ratings Owners' ratings
Overall rating is 4 rating is 4
Engine rating is 4 rating is 4
Ride & Handling rating is 4 rating is 4
Equipment rating is 5 rating is 4
Quality & Reliability rating is 5 rating is 4.5
Value rating is 5 rating is 4.5

Quality and Reliability

MCN rating rating is 5
Owners' rating rating is 4.5

The NC700X comes with the high level of quality you expect from a Honda - everything feels like it will last forever, the paint's deep. It feels a lot more expensive than the cheap price tag would suggest.

Value

MCN rating rating is 5
Owners' rating rating is 4.5

At under £6000 the NC700X is hard to ignore, for that you get a bike that'll do everything you could ask of it with relative ease (apart from a track day in the fast group, perhaps). In these cash-strapped times a cheap, real world motorcycle such as this is a breath of fresh air.

Insurance

Insurance group: n/a

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Model History

2012: model introduced

Other Versions

Honda NC700X DCT

Specifications

Top speed 115 mph
1/4-mile acceleration secs
Max power 51 bhp
Max torque 45.75 ft-lb
Weight 218 kg
Seat height 830 mm
Fuel capacity 14.1 litres
Average fuel consumption 75 mpg
Tank range 210 miles
Annual road tax
Insurance group of 17
Engine size 670 cc
Engine specification Liquid-cooled 8v sohc four-stroke parallel twin.
Frame Tubular steel diamond frame
Front suspension adjustment 41mm telescopic forks, non adjustable
Rear suspension adjustment Single rear shock. Non adjustable.
Front brakes 1x320mm front disc, three-piston caliper
Rear brake 240mm disc, single-piston caliper
Front tyre size 120/70 17
Rear tyre size 160/60 17

See all Honda NC700X motorcycles for sale

Honda
NC700X

6300 miles

£4,795

Honda
NC700X

6000 miles

£5,499

Honda
NC700X

4865 miles

£4,399

Honda
NC700X

6597 miles

£5,499

Honda
NC700X

4251 miles

£4,995

Owners' Overall Rating rating is 4(5 reviews)

  • Its not perfect

    Benjijackson

    Average rating rating is 3.5

    Show Details

    Overall
    Ride and Handling
    Equipment
    Quality and Reliabilty
    Value
    Engine

    Bought a NC700X from new. I have done 5kmiles and have sold it. Good bits; Engine - grunty (up to a point) and economical (avg'd 75mpg), storage compartment, light, good handling, mirrors Bad bits; Awful seat - slippery and thinly padded, Suspension on bumpy roads - here's where you see/feel the cost cutting, Aerodynamics - screen not big enough, not really suited to lots of high speed work, you get blown around too much. Riding position, a bit cramped. Not really a criticism but be aware that 40- odd bhp is ok for commuting but I missed a bit of oomph out of town or when i needed to overtake quickly. Summary; economical, good handling low-ish speed commuter. Be prepared to spend on suspension and/or seat upgrades.

    04 July 2013

  • NC700X Dual Clutch Transmission take 2

    Kingsil

    Average rating rating is 4.5

    Show Details

    Overall
    Ride and Handling
    Equipment
    Quality and Reliabilty
    Value
    Engine

    There has been a lot written about the NC series of bikes so I thought I would make a few general points and then write a bit more specifically about the Dual Clutch Transmission. For starters with the NC you are getting a machine that is actually built in Japan, not just designed there, and for what is a very low price. It will probably be a few years yet before production is shipped abroad. In the mean time you get excellent welding, deep paint and quality fit and finish for what amounts to peanuts. The suspension for the price point is good with a rising rate linkage at the rear and fairly decent forks. The brakes are very good indeed despite using a single front disc. The ABS/CBS is unobtrusive unless very severely provoked. The handling has been a revelation to me and entirely a consequence of the low centre of gravity, it’s a fairly chunky bike but you don't feel it at all. Slinging it into corners makes you smile a lot, it's an unexpected bonus. The engine however will never be enough if you like a regular adrenaline hit but if you are happy making smooth progress and use good forward planning (don't we all?) overtakes are easy. The engine characteristics are all about low revving torque, it feels lumpy but not at all vibey if that isn't a contradiction in terms. It's swift over distance but no one is ever going to accuse it of being quick and of course it’s very economical. But everyone knows that by now. As for the storage, everyone loves it even if they hate the bike. And while on the subject of hates and likes the Dual Clutch Transmission is Marmite! There are a number of myths and misconceptions surrounding it already, one guy insisted that the drive would drop out on slow corners, it doesn't, another insisted it had a power sapping fluid drive, it doesn't. There is a very good video explaining how it works on YouTube, it isn't rocket science but it is very clever and entirely computer controlled. That alone might put some off. Quite a few people will find it anodyne and boring. It would be a dull world if we all liked the same stuff. Get a test ride. So how does the DCT on the NC700x work in practice? The answer is very well most of the time. The two modes are distinctly different in behaviour. Drive mode short shifts at two and a half thousand revs and is best on steady A-roads and motorways (I hate m-ways but it copes easily) also Drive is best for slow town/filtering work. You can feel like you are in too high a gear sometimes but the engine just chugs away and you will never stall it or lose drive but there is little or no engine braking in Drive. This is where the linked brakes come in handy especially when filtering, you can balance on the foot brake and auto-clutch down to a dead crawl and with the low centre of gravity putting your feet down becomes a rare event. Sport (sic) mode is a little snatchy at town speeds so I don't use it in town anymore, and this is the thing, I'm learning as I go. This is all new stuff, like switching from a hand change to a foot change must have felt in the nineteen twenties. Sport mode really comes alive on twisty B-roads and so far doesn't seem to pick a gear I wouldn't have chosen myself, except it changes super smoothly and with no lag and doesn't get tired after a long day in the saddle. I have used manual shift on roads like the A32 for instance and it is interesting to do as an exercise but you soon find yourself thinking “what's the point?” In auto you still get all of the sensations of the gear-changes, the acceleration and the attendant lovely noises of down changes on the over-run. You just don't have to move your foot anymore. That will appal some people and if it does then DCT is not for you. The manual buttons might appear to be superfluous in light of what I've written but that couldn't be further from the fact. They are useful in a number of situations that I regularly encounter and I expect to learn of a few more as time goes on. The handbook mentions hills and recommends sport mode when encountering them so as not to lug the engine too hard but I simply select manual (right forefinger) and knock it down a gear or two (left thumb) switching back to auto at the brow of the hill. If you live in the West Country or somewhere similar you might never get out of sport or manual mode though! I also use the manual buttons while in Drive approaching slow corners in town knocking down a gear for a little more feeling of control, though the bike could care less and in truth the difference is negligible and more about me getting used to how low this thing revs in Drive. The other time I use the down shift button is for overtakes especially on fast A roads in Drive, if you whack open the throttle it will eventually take the hint and downshift but if you shift down manually and open the throttle it gets straight to it. In Sport mode this isn't an issue as it responds pretty much instantly. As I say it's just learning how to use it, there's no book on it. Finally you can switch between all modes while on the move so if you fancy a change you don't have to stop to switch over but you'll be glad to know you can't select neutral until you are at a dead stop. Personally I love Marmite just be sure you do too before ticking the DCT box. As I said get a test ride. Latest news from MCN: Looks like the new Yamaha R1 will be getting a version of DCT, very interesting times we live in! (MCN reader reviews have no formatting making anything beyond a few lines totally unreadable so I am pasting a copy of my review from a word doc and hoping the formatting travels with it. If it doesn’t, all I can say is sorry, I tried!)

    28 April 2013

  • NC700X Dual Clutch Transmission

    Kingsil

    Average rating rating is 4.5

    Show Details

    Overall
    Ride and Handling
    Equipment
    Quality and Reliabilty
    Value
    Engine

    There has been a lot written about the NC series of bikes so I thought I would make a few general points and then write a bit more specifically about the Dual Clutch Transmission. For starters you are getting a machine that is actually built in Japan not just designed there and for what is a very low price. It will probably be a few years yet before production is shipped abroad. In the mean time you get excellent welding, deep paint and quality fit and finish for what amounts to peanuts. The suspension for the price point is good with a rising rate linkage at the rear and fairly decent forks. Brakes are very good indeed despite using a single front disc. The ABS/CBS is unintrusive unless very severely provoked. The handling has been a revelation to me and entirely a consequence of the low centre of gravity, its a fairly chunky bike but you don't feel it at all. Slinging it into corners makes you smile a lot, it's an unexpected bonus. The engine however will never be enough if you like a regular adrenaline hit but if you are happy making smooth progress and use good forward planning (Don't we all?)overtakes are easy. The engine characteristics are all about low revving torque, lumpy but not at all vibey if that isn't a contradiction in terms. It's swift over distance but no one is ever going to accuse it of being quick and of course its very economical. But everyone knows that by now. As for the storage,everyone loves it even if they hate the bike. And while on the subject of hates and likes the Dual Clutch Transmission is Marmite! There are a number of myths and misconceptions surrounding it already, one guy insisted that the drive would drop out on slow corners, it doesn't, another insisted it had a power sapping fluid drive,it doesn't. There is a very good video explaining how it works on youtube, it isn't rocket science but it is very clever and all computer controlled. That alone might put some off, quite a few people will find it anodyne and boring. It would be a dull world if we all liked the same stuff. Get a test ride. So how does the DCT on the NC700x work in practice? The answer is very well most of the time. The two modes are distinctly different in behaviour. Drive mode short shifts at two and a half thousand revs and is best on steady A roads and motorways (I hate m-ways but it copes easily) also Drive is best for slow town/filtering work. You can feel like you are in too high a gear sometimes but the engine just lugs away and you will never stall it or lose drive but there is little or no engine braking in drive. This is where the linked brakes come in handy especially when filtering, you can balance on the foot brake and auto clutch down to a dead crawl and with the low centre of gravity putting your feet down becomes a rare event. Sport(sic) mode is a little snatchy at town speeds and I don't use it there any more, and this is the thing I'm learning as I go this is all new stuff, like switching from a hand change to a foot change must have felt in the nineteen twenties. Sport mode comes alive on twisty b-roads and so far doesn't seem to pick a gear I wouldn't have chosen myself, except it changes super smooth and with no lag and doesn't get tired after a long day in the saddle. I have used manual shift on roads like the A32 for instance and it is interesting to do as an exercise but you soon find yourself thinking what's the point? You still get all of the sensations of the gear-changes, the acceleration and the attendant lovely noises of down changes on the over-run. You just don't have to move your foot anymore. That will appall some people I know and if it does then DCT is not for you. The manual buttons might appear to be superfluous in light of what I've written but that couldn't be further from the fact. They are useful in a number of situations that I regularly encounter and I expect to learn a few more as time goes on. The handbook mentions hills and recommends sport mode when encountering them so as not to lug the engine too hard but round town I simply select manual (right forefinger) and knock it down a gear or two (left thumb) switching back to auto at the prow of the hill. If you live in the west country or similar you might never get out of sport mode though! I also use the manual buttons while in Drive approaching slow corners in town knocking down a gear for a little more feeling of control,though the bike could care less and in truth the difference is negligible and more about getting used to how low this thing revs. The other time to use the down shift button is for overtakes especially on fast A roads in Drive, if you wack open the throttle it will eventually take the hint but if shift down manually it gets straight to it. In Sport mode this isn't an issue. As I say it's just learning how to use it, there's no book on it. Finally you can switch between all modes while on the move so if you fancy a change you don't have to stop to switch over but you'll be glad to know you can't select neutral until you are at a dead stop. Personally I love Marmite just be sure you do too before ticking the DCT box. As I said be sure to get a test ride.

    27 April 2013

  • NC700X DCT

    petervoros

    Average rating rating is 4.5

    Show Details

    Overall
    Ride and Handling
    Equipment
    Quality and Reliabilty
    Value
    Engine

    Have had all types of bike in the past and loved them all for various reasons. This is something else though, it's the usual Honda good at everything but even more so and brilliant in value, cost to run, ride quality and comfort crowned by that engine and box which complement each other perfectly to make an unbeatable commuter that you can have fun on and is uber practical to boot. One demo ride convinced me very quickly that this is a sensible choice.

    14 November 2012

  • bordersmike

    bordersmike

    Average rating rating is 4.5

    Show Details

    Overall
    Ride and Handling
    Equipment
    Quality and Reliabilty
    Value
    Engine

    I've owned every type of bike over the years but I find the NC700X to be the ideal all-rounder and incredible value for money.

    01 November 2012

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700cc

700ccsays

Weight?

I've been charmed by the various comments about the NC 700X. But I wonder one thing: I've ridden a Transalp 650 (m 2000) for a long time and see the NC weight is 27 kg more than the XLV... Being myself not much weighty, I wonder if that +27kg increase will make a difference when riding/handling?

07 July 2013 14:06

Kingsil

User's Badge

Kingsilsays

4 Japanese ponies

The DCT has 51bhp against 47bhp for the manual, its in the specifications on Honda's website. I have the 700x DCT and rode a manual 700s while mine was in for a service. Because of the extra weight of the DCT there is nothing to choose performance wise and it is why Honda gave the DCT a few extra ponies. They are both great little bikes but I'm glad I went for the DCT, it isn't perfect but whether bombing along unknown b-roads in S-mode or effortlessly picking your way though the rush hour in D-mode it is damn near perfect as makes no difference. Some folks will love DCT and some will hate it on principle without even trying it. Bear in mind it took some of us thirty years to accept ABS and there are a still a few who even now won't entertain it.

27 April 2013 14:52

klrbikerman

klrbikermansays

"leebikes" is wrong and this is easily verfied through any Honda NC700X review on the web. The manual has the most power at 51, the DCT at 47. You loose the power through the automantic transmission and it also weighs considerably more.

07 March 2013 13:04

leebikes

leebikessays

only the dct is 51 bhp the geared one is 47, mcn has this wrong

13 August 2012 20:39

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