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Triumph STREET TRIPLE 675 Naked Motorbike Review

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MCN overall verdict rating is 5

Triumph’s new Street Triple looks just like a Speed Triple but with the engine out of the Daytona 675 – and it’s a revalation. The Street Triple is light, fast, fun, agile, sounds great, stylish, cool and cheap, too. Overnight the new Triumph has made its rivals seem like relics. The Street Triple isn’t just the best in its class it’s good enough and cheap enough to tempt all but the most performance-obsessed away from their sportsbikes. Not only that the little Triumph is comfortable enough to be an everyday town motorcycle, a first big bike or Sunday morning blaster. Like the new Triumphs of recent times, it seems like the firm from Hinckley once re-written the rule book.

 

Watch the video roadtest of the Triumph Street Triple

Watch the Triumph Street Triple take on the Suzuki SV650, BMW's F800 and Aprilia's 850 Shiver

See how the Triumph Street Triple compares to the Ducati Monster, Kawasaki's Z750, Honda's Hornet, Suzuki's GSR600 and Yamaha's FZ6


 

Engine

MCN rating rating is 5
Owners' rating rating is 4.5

It’s impossible to think of a better engine to power the Triumph Street Triple. The 675cc triple, lifted from the firm’s Daytona 675 offers absolutely everything you need whether you’re a new rider, do lots of town riding or you want to have fun out on the open road. The Street Triple motor is packed full of grunt, sounds great at full throttle and has enough power on tap to keep all but the most hardcore of riders entertained.

Ride and Handling

MCN rating rating is 5
Owners' rating rating is 4.5

Although the Triumph Street Triple doesn’t have fully adjustable suspension, out of the crate it’s set-up perfectly to suit UK roads and UK-riders, which is more than you can say for its soft n’soggy Japanese rivals when they leave their factories. The lightweight Triumph floats over bumps but doesn’t tie itself in knots when you turn the wick up. The Street Triple’s spacious, upright riding position affords the rider lots of control while being very comfy at the same time.

Equipment

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 4

You don’t get much in the way of bells and whistles on the Triumph Street Triple aside from Nissin calipers a multi-function LCD display and underseat pipes, but to be honest the Street Triple doesn’t need any superfluous add-ons to make it the great motorcycle it is. There are a number of bolt-ons available from Triumph like a fly screen, belly pan, rear seat hump and carbon fibre parts.

Triumph Street Triple (2007-current)

Detail Value
New price £6,999
Dealer used prices
£4,170 (2008) - £7,220 (2014)
Private used prices
£3,850 (2007) - £6,500 (2014)
  View full used price info
Engine size 675 cc
Power 97.6 bhp
Top speed 141 mph
Insurance group 14 of 17
  MCN ratings Owners' ratings
Overall rating is 5 rating is 4.5
Engine rating is 5 rating is 4.5
Ride & Handling rating is 5 rating is 4.5
Equipment rating is 4 rating is 4
Quality & Reliability rating is 4 rating is 4.5
Value rating is 5 rating is 4.5

Quality and Reliability

MCN rating rating is 4
Owners' rating rating is 4.5

Some recent Triumphs, including the Daytona 675 have had question marks over their reliability and durability, which is why we haven’t given it a 5/5 rating, but overall none of this should put you off if you’re considering a Street Triple. For the price this motorcycle is very well made and has decent attention to detail.

Value

MCN rating rating is 5
Owners' rating rating is 4.5

Costing just £5399 the Triumph Street Triple is fantastic value for money. It’s only £200 more than the GSR600, £100 more than the new Hornet and cheaper than the Ducati S2R and Kawasaki Z750. It beats of these bikes hands down when it comes to performance, usability, style, sound and handling – the Street Triple really is that good. Find a Triumph Street Triple for sale

Insurance

Insurance group: 14 of 17

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Model History

2007: Triumph Street Triple launched.

Other Versions

None.

Specifications

Top speed 141 mph
1/4-mile acceleration 11.93 secs
Max power 97.6 bhp
Max torque 47 ft-lb
Weight 167 kg
Seat height 800 mm
Fuel capacity 17.4 litres
Average fuel consumption 38 mpg
Tank range 145 miles
Annual road tax
Insurance group 14 of 17
Engine size 675 cc
Engine specification 12-valve, in-line triple, 6 gears
Frame Aluminium twin spar
Front suspension adjustment None
Rear suspension adjustment None
Front brakes 2 x 308mm discs
Rear brake 220mm disc
Front tyre size None
Rear tyre size 180/55 x 17

Owners' Overall Rating rating is 4.5(21 reviews)

  • Best Bike Ever?

    Anonymous

    Average rating rating is 5

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    Ride and Handling
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    Quality and Reliabilty
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    Engine

    When considering a new bike, I really thought the Ducati Panigale 899 was the answer to all of my questions- with it's light weight, drive modes, adjustable ABS & TC- what more could I want? At 50, I just could NOT get comfortable, and, the heat coming off it was unbearable at speeds under 50- the search was on! Although, Hooligan & nakeds were not on my list, I couldn't rule them out, either. After 8 bikes, including the new Yamaha FZ-09, nothing was even close to the '14 Street Triple 675 R ABS! At 400 Lbs, incredibly flickable, with a connection between rider and bike that's hard to describe with mere words. Awesome acceleration, with brakes that can warp time & space- just think it- and, it's done! Comfortable ergos with only a slight tilt forward, allows long days in the saddle without aching wrists or overly numb hands. Downsides: the wheelie monster is gone, and, there is no place to put a stick of gum on it! But, turn the key, and, any grumblings disappear with a flick of the wrist. The bike just begs you to go faster- I certainly found that my limits had expanded greatly! Quiet & tractable around town, but, a scary good twisty machine on the back roads- it exhibits surgical instrument precision when ridden hard. Personally, I couldn't subject anyone to the pillion, as it was more like punishment than a pleasure, so, I removed the rear foot pegs and installed a Lithium Iron battery to drop a few more Lbs- fitting on this bike! I did install many Triumph accessories (expensive, but, good quality) as well as a tank bag, so I could carry 'stuff' & 'things'. Now, it's perfect in every way, wracking up miles faster than any prior bike owned! The '13+ bikes are a touch more refined, about 13 Lbs lighter, have a tighter turning radius and get 50 miles/ gallon (vs. 38 mpg for '08-'12's). But, the long 1st gear makes wheelies a clutch & rev action, rather than the front just p- small price for so much. Also, all years have excellent reliability-get whatever you prefer, and, know that you may just have the best bike ever made! So good in every way that electronic controls are not needed or wanted. Pure perfection.

    09 September 2014

  • Impeccable

    wagend

    Average rating rating is 4.5

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    This is a dream machine. It's this generation's bandit, or the new VFR. It's a giant killer. It get's all the attention down the pub from bikers and the uninitiated alike. It's quick, it's smooth, it's light, it's comfortable (for me being 16 stone and 6'3'' and my mate who is 10 stone and 5'8''), it looks great, it costs peanuts, it sounds fabulous...the list goes on. I recently bought a brand new 2013MY STR and I had heard so many people bang on about it and even a few say "best bike ever". I was sceptical. I am no longer. It does everything and more that you could ask of it. I've outrun 1000cc bikes in a drag race on it (albeit courtesy of the dirt cheap £260 quick shifter), and it can make ground through the twisties because it's just so nimble, light and flickable and the chassis / brakes / suspension are faultless. It's not intimidating to ride, the bars are fantastic and give supreme control. It's a rare thing that will put a grin on an experienced face and thrill a new rider without making them shit their pants. It has plenty of rivals but none as cool, or half as capable.

    29 September 2013

  • A must buy if you're looking for 600cc Naked

    danbagg92

    Average rating rating is 4.5

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    I recently picked up my 2013 street triple. Have been beaming from ear to ear ever since I picked it up! Great, punchy engine that is always ready to go. Handles like a dream and is fairly comfortable on longer journeys too. It gets a 4 on equipment as triumph have seemed to make you pay a lot for any of the trick pieces i.e. fly screen at £110 Other than that, stop thinking about it and just buy it! forget your Honda Hornets, Yamaha xj6, Suzuki Bandits/Gladius and Kawasaki er6's. Just do what you know is right and get the triple, you won't regret it.

    07 August 2013

  • First bike bike 33bhp

    JSwaine13

    Average rating rating is 4.5

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    Engine

    I just had a honda varadero 125, being to young to do DAS i had to take my restricted license, i passed my test last week and got my new bike. Its restriced with triumphs own restrictor and still runinng it in, it is so so so much fun to ride can overtake on duel carridge way and as its a 675 i have so much torque i dont need to rev it pass 6000 to do 70mph, brakes are amazing compared to my bros hornet. Its stiffer to, there is a lil problem the throttle travel is comical and it turns lest than a quarter but it still will rev over 8000 i think havent done it, if u have a A2 license its a no brainer restrict a big bike its so much better than a 250. i didnt really have a choice as im 6'6 and 16 stone. unless your going to do track days the Triple R i think is a waste of money. GET ONE

    23 June 2012

  • 2012 model

    OllyTooting

    Average rating rating is 4.5

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    Engine

    Bought a new 2012 model about a month ago as my first 'big' bike. I never thought I could love a machine as much as this. I am slowly getting through the 'bedding in' phase and opening it up more and more. The power comes in through low revs (plenty between 3 and 5k) and keeps going. I was warned that the power can be a bit grabby but I've found it fine. The equipment that it came with is a mix. It doesn't come with ABS and only has preload adjustment on the rear suspension (thus the 4*s for equipment) but for the price thats not a surprise. It did come with a free accessory pack of flyscreen, small side fairings and a belly cowl (all colour matched). Even if they weren't free, I would recommend them as they look great. Without the fly screen, the instrument panel looks odd so it really should come as standard. This bike makes me smile every time I take its cover off, start the engine and open the throttle. I read a review of a Hornet where someone said they never look back when they are walking away from it. You won't have that problem with the Triple. The bigger problem is actually walking away from it.

    28 May 2012

  • Not for newbies?

    Anonymous

    Average rating rating is 4

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    I hooned around on a Yamaha 250 in my late teens. But that was 30 years ago and so really the timer is reset and I'm more a newbie than a born-againer. Those in the know advised me against a Street Triple on the the grounds that it was too powerful for someone with a new license. 'Go for a ER-6N' was the advice, on the grounds that it was a little more docile. I've had my STR for a year now and can say to any newbie that it's a good choice for anyone looking for a first 'post-test' machine. It's gentle and forgiving below 6000 rpm and handles and brakes like a dream. The problem with buying a less gutsy bike is that before long there will come a time when you'll want something more - a bit more oomph! Well the STR has it in bucket loads but it lets you choose when to bring it on. Now, for my next bike I fancy a Super Duke: a totally different proposition - and would fully expect it to take your head off without the right level of experience!

    08 October 2011

  • Top Bike!!

    l70jul

    Average rating rating is 4.5

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    Bought mine nearly new, had it a year, but returned to a Tiger because it was too impractical and I was riding it flat out as much as possible!! Awesome motor, recommended to all!!

    22 June 2011

  • Near perfect

    owensj

    UK

    Average rating rating is 4.5

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    Almost a perfect bike. Had mine for a year and done over 7k miles. Good points - looks fantastic with old style twin round lights. I have belly pan, fly screen and seat cowl at a reasonable price from Triumph. Engine is lovely. Really growls when you give it welly. Fuel economy better than expected at 53mpg giving a 180 tank range to empty. Thats on steady motorway miles. It's ergonomically good for me and comfy enough. It's light and easily flickable. I've never leaned as much (not that much though!) Quality parts have been used throughout Easy access to the battery Triumph name gives good street cred all round Bad points - it can be snatchy on the throttle. Generally OK but going over bumps it is noticeable. This was really bad in the first two weeks of breaking it in and I hated the bike! It has calmed down but still I get a little judder if I roll off quickly. Suspension is hard No ABS option Equipment skewed towards track days not road riding. Trip computer with mpg and lap times. But no fuel gauge so you have to keep track. Would I have another - yes ;-)

    22 June 2011

  • King of the street

    Gog31

    Average rating rating is 4

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    Great bike. Bit hard on the bum.... doesn't ride the bumps so well. But great pick-up. Not the bike for 2-up. Loved having it.

    09 May 2011

  • Almost Perfect

    gravelrashjr

    Average rating rating is 4.5

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    I loved the Street Triple. I only got 2 hours on it but it sure is fantastic to be on. Going around corners was so easy all i had to do was look at it and i was on the otherside! its quite hard to find anything wrong with this bike. Sure it may not be as well equipped as the japanese nakeds but it just adds to the whole look and feel of the bike. 5 stars all around

    09 May 2011

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simber9

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simber9says

Marty1035

You said the street is a Triumph so it will either fall apart or break down or both. I have mine since 17 June last year and not a problem. It starts up at the first press of the button, not a leak of any kind or any kind of problem. A mate of mine has a rocket three and he had had his bike over two years and not a single problem. Other Triumph owners have told me the same thing and some of them have really hammered their bikes. Sorry mate, but you are talking out of someplace the sun does not shine out of.

18 February 2009 15:19

Mike Mallett

Mike Mallettsays

Street Triple experience

While wandering in Birmingham last November I was approached by a very nice young lady who asked if I would like a test ride. The occasion was the NEC motorcycle show and I happened to be loitering next to the new Triumph Street Triple. The young lady, who was a Triumph employee made quite an impression on me – with her extensive knowledge about motorbikes, and Triumphs in particular – I hasten to add. She signed me up for a test of the aforesaid Street Triple. So one very fine day in early April, and accompanied by Russ on his Buell, we set off to Bulldog Triumph to take them up on their offer. I expect you are all aware that the Street Triple is a scaled-down version of the 1050cc Speed Triple which has been around for a few years. Its 675cc 3-cylinder engine produces 98bhp and 47ftlb of torque. The bike weighs just 167kg which is 20 kg lighter than the Honda CB500. We won’t bother talking about top speed because that’s only of interest to people who are still in short trousers. But it’s the way it gets there that’s impressive. When I ride an unfamiliar bike it always takes me a few miles to get used to it and become familiar with the position and response of the controls and any idiosyncrasies etc. None of that this time – within about 100 yards of the shop I felt almost as one with the bike and in total control – or so I thought. Actually controlling myself on this bike was the biggest problem. At last I was on a bike that had absolutely no problem keeping up with – and even overtaking – Russ on his Buell. Triumph seem to have paid particular attention to weight distribution on this bike. There was no feeling of the bike being dominated by a large centre of mass, which tends to happen with other light but larger-engined bikes. The result is the bike feels immensely controllable during braking (which I found almost too powerful), cornering and direction changes. It just gives a feeling of much greater control and confidence. The most impressive and surprising feature of the bike is the way the engine generates its torque. At 2000 rpm, or even slightly less, in top gear I pulled open the throttle when Russ accelerated on a clear road and the difference between the two bikes was unexpectedly small. And this from only 675cc! The torque-monster Buell produced a lovely rumbling thunder and the Street Triple a three-cylinder wail reminiscent of the works Triumph and BSA triples of the early 70s. The Triumph was equipped with an Akropovic exhaust manufactured for Triumph, and which I was assured was street-legal. However, I would prefer something slightly less stirring for everyday use. I am not really qualified to compare this bike with the modern Japanese sports bikes. The only experience I have had recently was riding a Honda CBR600R. The difference was remarkable. With the Honda the engine was flat until the tacho hit 7000+rpm, the motor seemed to be screaming with not much happening in the forward motion department until heady rpm’s were reached. I can understand why people who like sports bikes are now looking at Triumphs with greater interest. They are, comparatively, much easier to ride. So you are now wondering if I have put my deposit down and if not why not. Back in the 70s when I could not get enough of the adrenalin rush from riding an Allspeed equipped, Zip-Kart tuned RD400 with clip-ons and rear-sets I would not have hesitated. The Street Triple brought those feelings back and I very much enjoyed it – pure motorcycling pleasure. But in smaller doses now since I have now become a bit of an old fogey. There was very little to criticise about the bike itself – if I was really pedantic I could say that the throttle response could be slightly smoother – and the brakes felt too powerful if anything. Also the suspension is not quite so refined as the Buell’s. However – when I got back on the old Trophy it felt like a behemoth. But a well-built, reliable, comfortable and friendly be

28 May 2008 16:47

marty1035

User's Badge

marty1035says

Hahaha

The rave reviews are all well and good but it's a triumph which means it'll either break down or fall apart (or both). And why make a bike to look like another in the range that is already out of date?

29 January 2008 02:59

redbites

redbitessays

street triple

I own a Speed Triple and I feel a little conned by the Street Triple. The whole point about buying the ST (my 4th in 10 years) was it's uniqueness. I think Triumph should have designed the Street to look different. Designer's just played safe playing on the brilliant Speed Triple's design and character. Now I feel like people think I'm on a 675!

01 November 2007 13:13

Poke

User's Badge

Pokesays

My test ride

As a Speed Four owner, I wondered how the Street Triple would compare. I took if for a test ride and soon found out, it's a barking bike with a barking engine and exhaust too. It feels half the weight of my Speed Four, with lower seat height and much wider bars - but in truth, there's not much in it - only a few kg and about an inch in the seat and bar departments. Pootling around town, the Street3 was nimble, well mannered and easy to ride, yet itching to get going. Out of town, it made me feel bit of a minx. Open that throttle and you're off with that incredible triple roar and a massive grin on your face - it really deserves the hooligan tag of the Speed family! Handling is sweet. There's a bit of vibration through the seat and bars that kicks in around 4k rpm - which probably explains why they have a gel seat in the accessories catalogue. The Street Triple "only" has 2-pot brakes whereas my Speed4 has 4-pot which are like dropping an anchor, so I wondered how they'd compare. The answer is, they're good enough, although not up there with the S4. My only disappointment is not with the machine itself, but with its extras. At the very least it needs the pixie hat and alarm as STANDARD. Truth is that these and the seat cowl, screen, belly pan, and hugger are ALL EXTRAS, adding about £800-£1,000 to the price. Shame on you Triumph for advertising it everywhere with the pixie hat. So who's it for? Everyone, new and experienced, male and female, short and tall... But new riders be warned, it might be sweet to ride, boost your confidence and break you in gently... but give it respect it or it will bite you on the bum, just like any 600cc+ bike.

30 September 2007 18:00

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