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Anonymous

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MCN  says:

You ask/you answer: How should I deal with the police?

After two years riding, I got pulled over by a police car for the first time last Saturday. I was shocked and intimidated by the policeman's anger, and admitted straight away that I was speeding. I feel like I could have handled it better, but what should I have done? Your advice could help. Leave a comment below and we'll publish...

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  • Posted 3 years ago (30 May 2012 12:49)

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Piglet2010

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 2465

Piglet2010 says:

If visiting the US

If visiting (or living in) the US, shut off the bike when pulled over, take off your lid and gloves and remove earplugs, and have your license and insurance card ready while they run the plates through the computer. However, do not get off the bike, and once the cop gets out of the car, keep your hands in plain sight at all times. Could save your life, as getting off the bike (or getting out of a car) is seen as a threat and will usually result in having a loaded gun pointed at you.

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BMW_Mick1962

Joined:

Sep 08

Posts: 10

BMW_Mick1962 says:

Depends on the copper

I've had good and bad experiences with the police. The worst was in 1984, when having hit a car that was stolen with an unlicensed, uninsured driver who turned across me when I was on a 3 week old K100RS. Having smashed my left wrist, broken my right wrist and left shin and damn nearly died, I was visited my a truly charming officer. I forget his name but he was number 1944. His opening remark (having made sure he couldn't be overheard by anyone else) was "As far as I'm concerned you got what you deserved. If I had my way I'd ban all of you." things went downhill from then on. And yes, that's an accurate quote. I don't think I'll ever forget those words. Since then I've had good cops and bad cops, but if I'm honest, my experiences with the police - particularly non bike cops - have left me with a generally negative feeling towards them. I've come across far too many with a superiority complex who think they can say/do what they want. I've been verbally abused and on one occasion -when much younger- threatened with arrest for not being "respectful enough". I kid you not. The last time I was verbally abused was last year. The reason? Because I was riding a BMW. THAT particular "gentleman" found himself reported and forced to apologise. So how do I deal with the police? Politely but firmly, when on the bike. Once I'm off the bike the police seem to be totally different in their attitude.

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Piglet2010

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 2465

Piglet2010 says:

Better Keep In line

@ BMW_Mick1962 – Here in the US, the trend has been to hire and train police to enforce the authority of the state, and not to protect the people. They think that they *are* the law, rather than enforcers of the law. Better follow their orders (even if they have no legal right to give them), or they may decide to practice using their non-lethal weaponry on you prior to your arrest. And the state/federal DA’s (equivalent to the CPS) and courts generally back the police in these situations.

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troobs

Joined:

May 12

Posts: 2

troobs says:

Be polite

Don't act all cocky and be respectful to the police, they do take a lot of grief off some people, and if you are polite to them, they're only Human, and you have much more chance of them letting you off with just a warning!

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Coyote88

Joined:

Oct 09

Posts: 35

Coyote88 says:

I booked a couple!

Im plod, but not traffic. Many traffic officers come across as if they think they are a cut above the rest, but ask yourself why. They see grim accidents every day which must be hard to deal with and make them take speeding etc much more seriously. I avoid traffic police at all costs when out riding and dont give them the excuse to pull me.

I used to police Box Hill every weekend and gave about 2 tickets in 18 months and I pulled bikes every weekend. The reason i didnt give tickets was because the bikers were nice guys and polite and agreed they needed to calm down or accepted the plate was very illigal and would change it (bet they didnt). The couple of tickets were to attitude bikers who thought they could do what ever they wanted and disputed it ever happened, pr@ts. Be polite and accept you have got carried away (just a bit)  and you will be ok.

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rockabillyboy

Joined:

Sep 10

Posts: 184

My experiences with the police somewhat reflect what  B.M.W. Mick 1962 says . I to have been spoken to in a nasty manner without commiting any real offence , but  as you get older things do get better . I also suspect it depends on the bike plus your age / experience . A  lazy  weekend out with not much traffic about on your sports bike will probably mean a "pull" on spotting a police car , BUT  on my sidecar outfit I usually get a smile, knod or even a wave ? . You can see and feel the tension go when me ,my brother & [old] mates get stopped but on removal of helmets to reveal  grey or no hair and some banter on our part  makes for a good relationship with the police . Modern cops like a bit of respect  ,as it has mainly gone , so  try being respectfull  , while thinking about what you admit  .

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NeiljohnUK

Joined:

Oct 09

Posts: 36

NeiljohnUK says:

Always be polite, admit nothing until you know exactly why you've been stopped, even then say as little as possible. And remember although a lot of Police bike riders are bikers off duty, not all are, some do it for the job and nothing else, CID bike riders especially, yes I taught them in the past... And IF you can part on good terms a simple, non-masonic, handshake goes a long way for future biker/Police relations!

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bigbull

Joined:

Jun 09

Posts: 38

bigbull says:

Least said the better.

My opinion is "Least said the better". Traffic Officers perceive themselves usually as "The Gentlemen Police" Agreed they are the guys with the messy jobs after fatal or near fatal RTA's. But with their line of work they are not subjected to the street wise cheeky yobs as much as ur normal plod. They certainly consider themselves above that street corner type beat policing resulting in them being less tolerant. But never the less when engaged with them always be polite, admit nothing unless you get the feeling from them that there not going to try and put you off the road. You can inquire exactly why you've been stopped, but again politely, continue to say as little as possible. And remember the way you react can be the main factor of whether they use their discretion to warn you or not...

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