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Anonymous

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Steve Farrell  says:

‘Grave concerns’ about graphic safety ad

A leading riders’ group has said it has “grave concerns” about a graphic new safety ad.  The cinema ad by Transport for London shows a motorcyclist lying on his back in the road. While paramedics work to save him, he says to the camera: “I’m going into cardiac arrest now. Silly place to overtake, really. Still, you live and learn –...

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  • Posted 2 years ago (02 July 2013 09:49)

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geoffart

Joined:

Apr 08

Posts: 1036

geoffart says:

motorcycle accidents.

the road isnt the place to take risks and perform dodgy overtakes. no one, be they biker or cager, has the right to take those kinds of risks. if you get an overtake wrong, youc'll collide head on with a car... just imagine the devistation that would cause to the drivers life. 


maybe theyve recently seen a rise in motorcycle deaths, so thats the target.   its worth asking them why they are targetting motorcyclists, when normally its the cars fault in a motorcycle accident. 

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geoffart

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Apr 08

Posts: 1036

geoffart says:

drive v ride.

ive heard a lot of people say being a biker first helps car observation... and it seems to make sense, but my experience is different. i feel totally aware on a bike; in a car i feel really restricted and blind by comparision. im too close to the road, have too many osbticles blocking vision. i dont like driving.  i think riding first creates a good attitude, but a car is a very different beast to a bike. its time manufacturers had restriction placed on tjem regarding visibility standards.

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plumber01

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Feb 12

Posts: 149

plumber01 says:

realistic?

I ride in and out of london every day, I cant remember seeing a bike ride within the speed limit when possible not to. We do tend to ride faster than plod would be happy with, and its easy to blame car drivers for not estimating our speed etc, yes there are a load of dosy girls putting their make up on, drivers on the phone etc, but I also see bikers riding like organ doners sometimes , we arent always perfect, and its easy to blame someone else instead of taking responsiblity. Some old fart told me to take the attitude your always reponsible for your own safety, and almost every accident is aviodable.We need to learn to pedict others reactions and when someone else has to alter what they do to make us safer, we are doing it wrong, we arent invinsible, and sometimes need to be reminded so, and thats better than finding out the hard way.   Rant over

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IainT

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May 12

Posts: 3

IainT says:

There are some sensible comments here, my concern is all too often people live in clans and tribes, and so will defend their own. See the comments from car/lorry/bikers on youtube vids of cyclists getting left-hooked etc. In the last couple of weeks I've had encounters with bikes and cars that were pretty damned dangerous. Cars - it's usually tail-gating, dangerous overtakes and not indicating at all, ever. Bikes - I'm afraid to say it is nearly always speed. Last week I saw a biker who was easily doing 30mph in a busy car park, he can accuse the driver who backs out into him of being a SMIDSY all he wants, he will have contributed significantly. Was out near the Fosse Way last weekend, lots of excessive speed seen. Coming back home, a biker nipped between two slightly staggered cars in a place where people frequently realise they are in the wrong lane (yes their fault, anticipate this) pulled a wheelie and entered a roundabout without having any realistic chance to assess what was coming from the right. Some will claim that this sort of thing is their right and their risk. Someone else has to patch you up and foot the bill.

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rcraven

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Nov 08

Posts: 122

rcraven says:

Recent video

This video for once is aimed primarily  at the motorcyclist in a town scenario.  Just one of many short films being made to draw attention to the vulnerability of twv riders.  Many of the other films address other matters other than this one which puts the  blame actually onto the shoulders of the rider and he admits it.  In a town scenario the majority of accident , now called collisions, happen which include other vehicles and indeed 90% of such collisions  happen within 5 miles of home.

 

Unfortunately it does occur and whilst the campaign is called THINK BIKE it should also remind bikers of their own vulnerability and maybe should also include the words BIKERS THINK.  We are as bikers all aware of our vulnerability and of the stats but there are some  out there who behave like ostriches and don't believe that it will happen to them.

Just like pushing the envelope on our country roads where more of the more serious accidents happen some riders will push their luck or just ride inappropriately sometimes and that sometimes could be their last.

 

Good video, when seen with all the others that are out or coming out it gives balance and addresses the issue of the not to careful rider.

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