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MancAnd

Joined:

Oct 13

Posts: 14

MancAnd says:

Yellow Tint Visors

Been browsing the internet for helmets and so far as I know tinted visors are basically a no no in the UK (<10% okay I think). Got me thinking that I haven't seen much in the way for yellow visors and I would have thought that they would have been safer for riding as yellow tint makes things look sharper. You see it in sports - everything from skiing to shooting for those reasons.


I've seen 2 sides to the argument, some say its good and some say its bad - mostly referring to nighttime / foggy conditions. Does anyone have any experience of yellow tint visors on a motorcycle? Did it seem to help? Do you think this is something that maybe should be encouraged if it is in fact safer?:hmmm:

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  • Posted 305 days ago (20 October 2013 05:20)

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preunit

Joined:

Dec 10

Posts: 11932

preunit says:

High intensity yellow visors

never used a yellow visor before but i've used interchangeable yellow lens a lot when snowboarding, there're great for flat light conditions and when it's puking with snow, but when the light levels rise or when depth perception increases then I swop them out for a dark tint.

The difference with biking as apposed to a lot of other sports or past times is that you ave headlights/street lights to see by and deal with oncoming headlights, other sports rely on natural light or lack of it so wearing light enhancing lens makes sense, I think other vehicles oncoming lights would tend to distract you to the point of being dangerous tbh........just my 2 pence worth.

What's wrong with clear visors for dark/overcast conditions and darker tints for sunnier days?.

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

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Piglet2010

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 2364

Piglet2010 says:

My favorite is

the Bell Transitions photo-chromatic visor, even though it is bloody pricey.

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MancAnd

Joined:

Oct 13

Posts: 14

MancAnd says:

Food for thought

Good points, I like the look of the Bell transition - not such a fan of the price tag though...:blink:

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ANichol

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 989

ANichol says:

Photochromic visor

a very good idea. Still not UK road legal though.

Stupidities of UK visor law:

Sunny day, dark visor = illegal ("unsafe")

Sunny day, clear visor, squinting to try to make out the road = legal ("safe")

Sunny day, clear visor down, sunglasses digging into temples causing headaches = safe

Sunny day, clear visor up for venting, sunglasses digging into temples causing headaches = unsafe

Middle of the night and dark visor = unsafe (duh)

Middle of the night and clear visor down with sunglasses on = safe (ffs)

Middle of the night and clear visor up with sunglasses on = unsafe

Photochromic visor at any time = unsafe

Riding around in the middle of the night wearing nothing but a thong, lid and sunglasses with a clear visor down = "Safe"; lift the visdor up and now you're breaking the law.

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Mjollnir

Joined:

Aug 08

Posts: 721

Mjollnir says:

The whole visor law is stupid.

and most traffic cops (if there are any left) won't stop you for a dark visor if the conditions are appropriate, and if they do, they usually let you off if you have a clear visor to hand to swap out if you get caught out, i.e. later than expected or in a heavy rain etc.


The thing that strikes me as most insane is that you can only wear a tinted visor up to 50% tint. However, you could have a clear visor on and wear sunglasses that only let 8-18% of light through and still be legal. Now ask yourselves which is easier to remove from in front of your eyes if you enter a dark tunnel etc..

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James600zx

Joined:

Sep 07

Posts: 2789

James600zx says:

Bell photochromatic visor.

The only common-sense objection to a dark visor used in bright conditions is the possibility of losing good vision when you ride into a shaded area like under thick trees or entering a tunnel. Early photochromatic lenses darkened rapidly but took too long to go clear again, ie: same problem. Is the Bell any better in that respect?

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Piglet2010

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 2364

Piglet2010 says:

I have never noticed

the change in the Bell Transitions being too slow - including track days at Blackhawk Farms.

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Piglet2010

Joined:

Oct 11

Posts: 2364

Piglet2010 says:

In the UK

are you allowed to wear a lid with a clear shield and a tinted flip-down "sun shade"?  I often ride in hot weather in daytime with the outer clear visor open and the shade down, since it still keeps the wind from drying my eyes out and protects from minor insect or stone chip impacts.

No legal issues for me - this is how most people on motorcycles look around here.

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ANichol

Joined:

Aug 02

Posts: 989

ANichol says:

Legal grey areas [groan]

UK law says the protective screen (visor) between eyes and world must be of approved safety standard, though a screen itself isn't actually required (being smacked in the eyeball by a bee at 100mph is "fine").

Visors with less than 50% light transmission are banned.

Flip down sunscreen and sunglasses are ok so long as the clear (or above 50% transmission) visor is down. If you lift it up, the glasses or flip down becomes the 'screen' and won't have offical safety recognition. This is very much the minutiae of the law though.

Fog city used to sell an anti-fog insert that turned blue in sunlight, and had a very mild green tint in darkness. This passed the 50% requirement, but is technically a 'modification' of the approved safety screen, which isn't permitted. The same is technically true for clear anti-fog inserts, but you're unlikely to be picked up on it unless you've been pulled for some more serious reason.

The same is true for stick-on inserts that were popular(ish) about a decade ago. They were essentially semi-tranparent PVC that fit to the inside of a visor to turn it into a dark visor. They were prone to going opaque if folded too hard though.

Helmets are the only compulsorary bit of kit in the UK. If you have an open face, you can have goggles, but these need to meet the safety standards too. Gotta say, I'm not a fan of those mushroom-style lids popular in some helmet required US States

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MancAnd

Joined:

Oct 13

Posts: 14

MancAnd says:

Flip down inserts

I've been looking at what on offer and I'm likely to get purchasing one of these. Don't quite fancy having any glasses digging into my temples and tbh, how much protection is there with them?


Not a fan of the open face helmets, mainly due to a story from a lad I work with who said that he usually wore them but on a day when he had a drop he was thrown over the handlebars face first and he couldn't lift his head off the tarmac for whatever reason - thankfully it was a wet day and he decided to ride with his full face helmet. He then got rid of his open face after that.

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